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EDO? 12111*33 fl 

California State Library 




m "'"rid7" "''"- "I"'/""' «*> «>lime was tita I, 

mthOeppce pari y) any, may be found oppo 
Hie abort number ,n the Register of Books, 
winch is always open to inspection. 

Extract from the Political coda. 

Section 2296. Books may be taken fro,,, UleLibrarv 
by the nunms of thk Lkoisutore, ,„■„»; ,„» 8 2 
thkbbof and by other State officers at any kirn" 

Sue. 2298. The Controller, if notified by the Librarian 

ha any officer has failed .to return hooks taken by him 

within the .me prescribed by the Rules, and after dema d 

made, must not draw his warrant for he salary of u"h 

„f the '^'"L 1 the re ." ,rn ia made < or U >"* "mee he y« 

iubSa." of any ,nj,,ries theret °' hM ■»•» ■-" s 

anv'Lfw'L Ev . el 7.P 8 , ,,8< > n >r ho in J" res "'■ ^ls to return 

S^of'. S , ' abletoth - L ''>™.'ia„ in th,o, time, 

■Jr? SET! Sl ' a11 I 1 ' 1 " ° r deU '" tr0m ti,e G "" eral Lil ™y 
mote than two volumes at any one time, or for a longer 

theKuies] **" AT AKY ™«- [attract from 

«*-The Foregoing Regulations will be strictly enforced.-** 



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Vol. 35. 



SAN FRANOISOO. SATURDAY, JAN. 3, 1885. 



Bo. 26. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



A Lor© Quarrel <|»oetrv) 16 

a Million fltlr (poetey] i« 

An ImjH. riant Change.... 20 

An Important Dtooonry. ."• 

An Intelligent Dog. is 

A Sacred Wreath (poetry) 4 

Australian and New Zealand Notee....l(J 

"Biz" 13 

Business Changes 1* 

Cleveland's Letter 10 

Comments on Foreign Affairs. 20 

Concerning Uonnonism 10 

Cradle, Altar, and Tomb 15 

Depression in Manufacturing Indus- 
trie* 15 

Female Head-Gear— A Suggestion 3 

Fidelity (poetry) 2 

Good Resolutions 2 

Mag's Letter 14 

Notabilia 17 



Passing Remarks Q 

Pleasure's Wand 6 

Plymouth Church Religion 10 

PrioOl "i Leading Stocks, etc 1 

Real Estate Transactions 17 

Scientific and Useful 18 

slogging 14 

Society 3 

Sporting 7 

Stocks l 

Sunbeams 10 

That Infamous Character Again 2t) 

The Gav Kare-Taker ( poetry) .12 

The Maiden Aunt to Her Niece (poetry) 5 

The Memories of '84 (poetry) 10 

Town Crier 11 

Wedding Mistakes 20 

Why the Match was Broken Off 3 

Women I Meet— La Femme Incomprise 2 
World, Flesh and Devil 8 



G 



OLD BARS— 920 6ne par.— Refined Silver— 16i@18 ]? cent, dis- 
count. Mexican Dollars, S5@Sr»}c. nominal. 

"Exchange on New York, 15c.@20c. ; on London Bankers, 49?d.@ 
49gd. Paris, sight, 5-12£@5-10 francs per dollar. Telegrams on New 
York, 20c.@25c. " 

"Price of Money here, G@10 per cent, per year — bank rate. In the 
open market, f@l£ per month. Demand fair. On Bond Security, 
5@6 per cent, per year, on Call . Demand good . 

" Latest price of Sterling in New York, 481@485. 



PRICES OF LEADING STOCKS AND GOV. BONDS. 

8an Frandaco, Jan. 2, 1885. 



Stocks and Bonds. 


Bid. 


Asked 


Stocks and Bonds. 


Bid. 


Asked 


BONDS. 








— 


— 


Cal. State Bonds, 6's,'57 .... 


— 


— 


BANKS. 






S. F. City & Co. B'ds, 6s, '58 


— 


— 




155 


158 


S. F. City & Co. B'ds, 7s . . . 


= 


= 




130 
117J 


140 




119 


RAILROADS. 




Sacramento City Bonds. . . . 


— 


— 




33 


35 




— 


— 


C. P. R. R. .Bonds (ex cou.) 


108 


110 










60 













ttOJ 
941 


_ 


— 


N. B. and Mission R. R 


93 


Los Angeles County Bonds. 
Los Angeles City Bonds. . . . 
Virg-a & Truckee R. R. Bds. 


— 


— 




102 
96} 
25 


105 




98 


_ 


_ 


Central R. R. Co 


30 


Nevada Co. N. G. R. R. Bds 


— 


— 




Nom. 


Nom. 




— 


— 




— 


— 




107 


108 








S. P.R. R. Bonds (ex cou). . 


911 


94 


Oakland Gaslight Co 


28} 


291 


U. S. 4s (ex cou) 


1214 


122} 




50 


56 


N.Pf lific R.R. Bonds (ex c) 


101'. 


102 


Calilor'a Powder Co 


125 


150 




ico 

140 


105 
150 




57J 
50 
58J 


621 




Gold and Stock Teletr'h Co. 






65 




119 


124 


S.V.W.W.Co's Stock 


87+ 
115 


87} 




00 


100 


S.V.W.W.Co's Bonds (ex c). 


116} 


MISCELLANEOUS. 






Pacific Coast S.S.Co's Stock 






Pacific Rolling Mills 


80 


110 




80 


82J 




37i 
46 


42J 

48" 




10 








69 




30 
Hi 

f 


35 
Ul 

5 


1NSURANCB COMPANIES. 


128 
107J 
















108} 







Quite an average business has been transacted during the week. The 
sales in the street are much more than appear in the published reports of 
the exchanges. San Francisco Gas stock suffered from the Mayor's veto, 
and on Wednesday sold at 57J against 63 the week previous. 

A. Bajrd, 411 Montgomery street. 



The European correspondent to whom the News Letter is in- 
debted for the information regarding the Eastern Siberia Trading Com- 
pany, which we published last week, is prepared to receive an offer for 
the whole or any part of thirty thousand marks' worth of the Askold 
Gold Mining Company's bonds. 

Guaymas. — The steamer Newbejm, from Mexican ports, brought up 
478 bales Orchilla, 775 cs. Oranges, 2,263 HideB, 721 bdles. Sugar Cane, 
etc.; also, in Treasure, §108,393. 

Latest from the Merchant's Exchange.— N ew York, Jan. 2, 1885. 
TJ. S. Bonds— 3s, 10U, b.; 4s, 1211, ex int.; ty** 113J, b. Sterling 
Exchange, 481@485. Western Union, 54. Market—Dearer. 



India.— The City of New York, hence, carries 2,066 bbls. Flour. 



London, January 2. — Consols, 99d. 



STOCKS. 

The new year opens with a more hopeful feeling in local mining cir- 
cles. The days of blind and reckless speculation will soon pass into his- 
tory, under the dawning light of a new era of legitimate business in our 
home mines. The past year has been one of repeated disappointment and 
loss to the holders of Comstock mining shares. Yet the mines have pro- 
duced more bullion than they did during the preceding year. This State, 
however, did not derive any benefit from this source ; on the contrary, 
thousands of dollars passed from it, to be literally thrown down the played- 
out Comstock mines, or to assist in the extraction of ore which swelled the 
coffers of the thieving milling rings in Nevada. The same amount ex- 
pended nearer home would have been productive of much good, and there 
would have been fewer complaints of hard times. California needs every 
dollar that can be raised right within her own boundaries, and there is a 
strong probability that it will remain there, to a considerable extent, dur- 
ing the coming year. There will be a boom in California mining proper- 
ties before long, and mines which to-day are going a begging, will be held 
at a premium. One dollar spent in development of a single gold claim in 
one of the adjacent counties, is worth more to the investor than a thou- 
sand paid up to delve at a depth of 3,000 feet in the Nevada mountains 
for something that never will be fcund. Shasta, Trinity, Sierra, Cala- 
veras, Plumas, El Dorado, and in fact nearly every county throughout 
the length and breadth of this State, offer at present inducements to cap- 
italists and the investing public generally, which should not be overlooked. 
Moreover, the development of our home mining industry is of the most 
vital importance. California must eventually fall back upon it as her 
sole dependence in building up the Bources of a home consumption for a 
home supply. 

Business on Pine street has been unusually dull, considering the flatter- 
ing reports from certain quarters. Following will be found some of the 
latest information from the mines: 

Hale & Norcross is again the center of attraction, and speculators 
eagerly await the result of the present important operations. The work 
seems to be carried on systematically and with a view of opening up the 
different levels about the same time. A vein of ore has been encountered 
in the crosscut on the 2,800-foofc level, which is said to be three feet wide, 
and assays from §40 to §600 per ton. A drift is being run west to con- 
nect with the bottom of the winze on the 3,000-foot level, and a west 
crosscut will also be started on the 2,900-foot level. Private dispatches 
corroborate the reports of high assays. This is now the only quarter in 
which a hope is left for a paying ore body. We trust this hope will be 
realized in the development of something worth showing up. A failure 
just now would prove disastrous. 

The tunnel in Savage is in about 600 feet. Nothing, however, has been 
encountered which is encouraging, although the formation through which 
the work progresses is of the moBt favorable description. The old drifts 
on the 2,300 and 2,700-foot levels of Union are being cleaned out prepara- 
tory to future explorations. In Sierra Nevada the work of cleaning up 
and repairing timbers is also going on in the old drifts on the 
upper levels. Some very favorable indications have lately been en- 
countered on the 2,500-foot level of this mine. The drift in Alpha is look- 
ing well. A body of quartz has been opened here, from 80 to 100 feet 
wide, with an occasional bunch of ore giving low assays. 

Considerable pay ore is being extracted in Con. Virginia and California 
from the old workings on the 1,750-foot level. Judging from the list of 
stock advertised for sale for non-payment of the late assessment, the 
company will make a pretty clean sweep this time. A winze is being 
sunk at the end of the 1,500-foot level cioss-cut in Ophir to connect with 
the 1,750 levels of these mines. The work of exploration is being diligently 
prosecuted on the 825 foot level of Best and Belcher, and rumor has it, 
as usual, that the reports are most encouraging, and that quartz is being 
found which gives low assays. It is nearly time something turned up in 
this quarter. As a mine it has always commanded a high price, and has 
always been on the eve of surprising the world, but we have yet to hear 
of its producing anything in the way of precious metals to warrant its 
right to be termed a mine. 

The prospects in Gould & Curry are certainly more favorable than any 
other mine on the lode. They are now working altogether in virgin 
ground, which is quite extensive. The usual quantity of low grade ore 
is being sent to the mills from Yellow Jacket, Belcher and Crown Point. 

Outside stocks have experienced their share of the prevailing depres- 
sion in business, and transactions in the favorite shares have been light, 
at greatly reduced rates. 

On the first or September last, Messrs. Thomas Price, George W. 
Beaver, Arthur F. Price, Louis A. Garnett and Ben. T. Lacy were 
granted a franchise to erect a Bait water bathing establishment on Mar- 
ket street, between Fourth and Fifth streets. On the 31st ultimo these 
gentlemen incorporated, under the laws of the State, as the San Fran- 
cisco Salt Water Bathing Association. Pure, clean salt water will be 
carried in capacious pipes from North Beach, and the water in the tank, 
which ia to be 50x100 feet, will be kept continuously changing. The es- 
tablishment will be a great convenience to the public, and promises to be 
in all respects a pronounced success. Work will be commenced at an 
early day, and the place will be fitted up with every convenience and 
luxury. 

Registered at the Postoffice at San Francisco, California, as Second-Class Matter. 



Printed and Published by the Proprietor} Frederick Marriott, 607 to 615 Merchant street, San Francisco, California. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Jan. 3. 1885. 



WOMEN I MEET.— LA FEMME INCOMPRISE. 

[By Silver Pen.] 

Last week I said there was such a female in every circle as La Femme 
above mentioned — a woman whom no one can understand according to 
the English vernacular — and now to paint her as I have met her. 

She is a woman for whom I have the profoundest pity, not unmixed 
with contempt. This poor woman is, indeed, not an object to be envied, 
albeit she is generally happy in her misery, which is self-compounded and 
upon which she diets herself until she becomes as thin as a rail. La 
Femme Incomprise is for the most part always dissolved in tears ; or, 
when the fountains behind her eyeB are dry from long weeping, she in- 
dulges in sighs, of such depth and intensity, that the sympathetic hearer 
naturally concludes she is either suffering from a heavy attack of bron- 
chitis, or that asthma will shortly become chronic. As a girl, this pen- 
sive, tearful, sighing mood is not altogether unbecoming, especially if she 
is a pretty girl and she manages her scenes well; but, as she advances in 
years and keeps up the same role, even unto the period when wrinkles 
and gray hair warn you that the time forsuch foolery is over, it becomes 
Blightly monotonous. In fact, I know of no more terrible dose than life 
spent with one of this order. 

She is never understood. She suffers cruelly from the wrong construc- 
tion put upon her words and actions. And upon such occasions as a dif- 
ference of opinion from any one she has the misfortune to lose, she im- 
mediately has recourse to the fountain at the back of her eyes. Oh, how 
this woman weeps quiet, silent tears of misery. She is not a noisy woman, 
by any means. When " misunderstood " she feels the uselessness of argu- 
ment, and retires to her bed-room to ful611 her mission of weeping. Nat- 
urally, the family feel dreadfully for the morbid sorrow of this member. 
Upon leaving the circle, all know that this miserable being will lock her- 
self in the room and stay there for the day. Food is offered her through 
the bolted door. I mean they implore her to open the door to receive the 
little tray of dainties, prepared to bring back quiet to her distraught 
mind ; but she resolutely sets her face against this measure. Food is not 
for her, however hungry she may be, and she is hungry, but scorns to 
give in. The hight of her ambition is to be a martyr, and she is willing 
even to make herself seriously ill in order to give color to her hard fate. 
However, La Femme does not actually starve — not at all. She has com- 
mon sense enough to know that such a proceeding would deteriorate from 
her good looks ; so, while she weeps, sighB, and makes the whole house- 
hold wretched about her poor appetite, she takes the opportunity of sup- 
plying the inner man by stealthy visits to the pantry when no one is near. 
Thus she is well able to keep up the reputation of being a second Tanner 
— a female one. 

La femme is jealous of the attentions of every member of the family — 
that is, mildly so. If her husband pets one of the children without no- 
ticing her, she instantly turns on the faucet, and down comes the rain 
from the windows of her soul— but always in a suppressed way. " You 
don't love me any more," is a favorite way of putting it. If remon- 
strated upon by aforesaid husband, sobs long and low peal from her chest. 
" You don't understand me — cannot realize my sensitive nature." She is 
also frantically jealous of other women, but keeps the fire down by 
means of the faucet. She upbraids her poor husband if he looks at an- 
other — not loudly, but in a manner calculated to send him crazy. " You 
spoke to that dreadful woman and looked at her as you never look at 
me," she sobs, and either pretends to faint or has a violent fit of hyster- 
ics. La Femme seldom smiles. She goes through life with a woe-strickan 
visage, which would seem to betoken that she had committed some fright- 
ful and unconfessed crime. She is mostly ill in one way or other; the 
children are not permitted to wear anything heavier than carpet slippers, 
lest the creaking of their shoes should give mamma a worse headache 
than she usually has, or set her nerves so terribly on the rack that hyste- 
ria is produced at once. I have lived among women of this sort often- 
times, and assure you the picture is by no means overdrawn. I have 
often been the depositary of such a woman's secrets, which, however, 
never amounted to a row of beans. It was all twaddle, perfect twaddle. 

The chief delight of La Femme is novel reading. Not the healthy 
novel that is enlightening to the mind, but harrowing love stories, which 
set the eye fountains in full play. She puts herself into the shoes of the 
ill-used heroioe, and weeps for herself in bitterest sorrow. Once one of 
the order lived next door to me, and we became friendly. She had been a 
pretty girl, evidently, but now, to say that she looked like the twin sister 
of the pump handle, would but dimly describe the attenuation of her 
form. 

She had a splendid husband, and oh ! what a life she led that man. If 
he looked at a woman she invariably fainted away, Btill having perfect 
consciousness, and for a solid hour that simpleton would keep herself as 
rigid as a corpse. From this state she would rise to pour forth rivers of 
tears, all the while bemoaning that nobody understood her. At first I 
listened to her woes with sympathy. Go in at any time in the day and 
Madam would be sitting with drooped head and hands depending by her 
Bide, the picture of that despairing young woman who" never told her 
love." Her children were dirty and wretched; though, understand, these 
were people in very comfortable circumstances. No servant would stay 
with this morbid creature. She gave every one the blues— only myself. 
I fortunately have an abundant flow of spirits (not alcoholic) and used 
to wake up my friend until she laughed, showed her beautiful teeth, 
which tears had not Bpoiled, and go in for a good time. Like a flash she 
would Bubside, and, without any visible cause, drop into her usual state 
of sorrow, grieving that her chronic Btate of pain had been removed. " I 
should not laugh. What right have I to be gay ? " she would say. 

" What's the matter with you ?" I would ask. 

"Ah, my dear, you would not understand me if I explained. My life 
is a blank." 

I remember one day she sent to beg I would help her to fix something, 
her servant having decamped. I went aud cleaned up the parlor, etc., 
setting flowers everywhere. She fell on my neck and kissed me, saying I 
was the "bright spot in ber life." I was intensely amused, and when 
her spouse came home from his office, I, being in another room, heard 
him say: 

" What fairy ha* made the place so beautiful ? " 

A shrill little cry escaped La Femme, and the next move was a crash. 
I rushed in, and lo! the vase of flowers, a handsome glasB epergne, had 



vanished through the window. Then I knew what was the matter. She 
went straight into a jealous frenzy, tore her hair, rushed into her bed- 
room and gave the fountain full swing. 

"My God, will it always be like this? " ejaculated the poor husband, 
while I, disgusted, removed myself, and never again entered the door of 
La Femme Incomprise. 

When you see a woman of this class at a dinner party, woebegone and 
appetiteless, you may know that she is one of the order. At the same 
time, be sure she has had a good feed in the pantry before arriving. I 
will say, that in America the genus does not seem to exist. Here the 
women are smart enough to know that life is too Bhort to waste in such 
utter folly ; but all over Europe and the British Isles La Femme In- 
comprise lives and thrives in every circle of society, especially among 
the middle classes. 

FIDELITY. 

So long ago ! It seems but yesterday 

We stood beneath the quivering stars to part ; 
He hopeful as a man, my woman heart 
Faint with foreboding. "Love," I hear him say — 
" Let yon bright stars be witness while away 

That I am true, for doubting doth impart 
A pain more grievous than the passing smart 

Of separation." I am old and gray. 
But still I wait and watch the stars at night. 

I scarce c«n hope, I have no voice for prayer. 
I cease to dream his form doth glad my sight, 

I only love and trust. The stars are there 
And he is true. And Love will reunite 

Our sunder'd souls, or here or otherwhere. 

— E. V. Ckeverton, in The Current. 

GOOD RESOLUTIONS. 

Now, when eighty-five has just stepped into the shoes vacated by 
the defunct eighty-four, is the season for the forming of good resolutions, 
which, as some cynic has observed, form the main pavement of the road 
to hell. Many a bibulous youth has, this week, " sworn off," and many a 
giddy maiden baB inwardly vowed that she will eschew bangs, candy, dime 
novels and sundry female gew-gaws, save up her pocket money aud have a 
little bank account of her own. The News Letter would suggest a few 
resolutions to both sexes, which, if adopted and Btuck to, would greatly 
conduce to public morality and general comfort. For our young men — 
never to stand around street corners and annoy passing ladies by im- 
pertinent staring and rude remarks ; in tact, not to attempt to mash any 
more. To try and show a little more respect to men who are older than 
themselves. To eliminate oathB from thtir conversation when riding in 
cars, or when in public places. To. refrain from carrying pistols, except 
when there is cause. To talk " shop " as little as possible when in com- 
pany, and strive to impress themselves with the idea that not one person 
in a hundred cares a Bnap about their private affairs, and that, when 
talking persistently of self, they constitute themselves bores of the worst 
type. Old men should resolve to stay at home when they have bad 
coughs, and not to annoy others by their wheezing, grunting, ex- 
pectorating and coughing. To cease talking of their ailments, 
except to their doctors. To remember, occasionally, when re- 
proving youth, that they were once young themselves, and 
are still mortal. Not to stay too late at the club, or when there to 
tell the same story more than twice in one evening. To acknowledge age, 
and not make themselves ridiculous by aping youth. Our young girls 
should resolve to be natural without being coarse, and polite without 
being affected. To give up the use of powder and paint, false hair and 
false vanity, and to learn, not that "nature unadorned is adorned the 
most " exactly, but to draw the line somewhere on dress. Not to keep 
too many strings to their bows, or beaux on a string, as the one may snap 
the other. To learn how to manage a house and how to cook. To stay 
at borne at least three nights in the week, and try to think that " there's 
no place like home." Our old ladies Bhould reBolve to eschew scandal, 
and learn to speak well of their neighbors. To recognize that old ewes do 
not look well dressed lamb fashion. To try and keep their tempers at all 
times and under all circumstances, and to growl as little as possible when 
their daughters' beaux stay a little late. Any amount of other resolu- 
tions could be suggested, but space forbids. 



A new game has lately been introduced into English country houses. 
It is called " Rabbits." A piece of twine, some yard or so in length, is 
procured, in the center of which a knot is tied. A lady takes one end 
in her mouth and a gentleman the other, the one that arrives at the knot 
first wins. This game cannot fail to become popular in California this 
cold weather. It brings the lips of the parties so close together that the 
result must prove extremely satisfactory. 

Save money and get the best I Burnetts Standard Flavoring Ex- 
tracts are of triple strength, and pure fruit extracts. For flavoring, use 
one-quarter the quantity of the ordinary extracts offered for sale. 

See advertisement on cover to know where to get the genuine 
Krug Champagne from Reims, France. Beware of California and other 
counterfeits. 

A Washington eccentric female genius has invented a machine to lay 
a ghost. A much mure useful contrivance in these days of business stag- 
nation and indolent hens would be a machine to lay an egg. 

__^ — Norr. Herald. 

The very choicest products of Japanese art are to be found at 
Marsh & Co.'s, No. 6U5 Market street, at reasonable prices. Examine 



The Collateral Bank of Uncle Harris advances money on Pianos 
and all kinds of Securities at lowest rates. 15 Dupont street. 

A Mazarin Bible sold for $19,500 at the Syston Park Library sale in 
I London. 



.I..1L 8 



CALI KOKN I A A I >V KHT1SER. 



SOCIETY. 



December 3lat, 1884. -We ware rather ntamaAun in congratulating 

•! ill.' Winter, for, during the put weak there 

'!'!• th. in .1 few sh up nips Felt, and we have Da< d able t" ap 

in .i -!L !it degree what oar friends .ti tin- Baal have been endur* 

ink' f"i montha. I do not know but what it. is preferable to 

tha warm, moist weather of the preceding weak. The remark has been 

I universal that Ohriatmaa □ bo little tike Christ maa as it did 

er. But 1 think that if the chill remains iii the air, or a few 

il ike.- of snow should be added toMuorrow. New Year's will Been like 

New Year's as it is remembered the Other side of the Knekies, 

01 coaree Christmas waa the event of the week just past, and equally 
..( coarse the dinners given were almost as numerous as there are house- 
hold* in the eitv. Innumerable also were the gathering's in the even- 
ing, probably the pie ins that which took place at the Bella 
Viata, where music, recitations and dancing were the order of the night. 
Mrs. Bpaolding promisee the guests a hop to-morrow night, which will, of 
, be a delightful affair. Christmas Tree parties and Christmas 
Church festivals have also been in order, Mrs. Fair giving n very large 
one of the Former to her daughter's young friends on Christmas Eve, and 
the various Sunday schools have indulged in the latter ou different even- 
ings of the week, much t-> the gratification of all concerned. 

< In Saturday night the San Francisco Verein Club reception was very 
Largely attended. The rooms were beautifully adorned and decorated 
with Rowers and greens, and the thoughts of more than a few of the 
guests were tilled with recollections of similar scenes in the Fadcrland in 
days long gone by, Christmas being with moat German families the hap- 
stivul of the year. New Year's, ou the cuntrary, is celebrated by 
the French, aud the Concordia Club will hold their reception on New 
War's Eve (to-night), at their rooms on O'Farrell street. 

Hut, although December may have been dull, January promises to 
make amends, aud a number of good thiols in the gay line are already 
announced, and more are promised, and still more anticipated. For in- 
stance, there are the two " Cerman" Clubs; the Crickets, at B'nai B'rith 
Hall od the 9th; and the Enthusee at Mrs. Fair's on the 14th. The long 
promised ball at the Crockers will undoubtedly take place ; Mrs. Hop- 
kins is considered good for some kind of an entertainment, perhaps two ; 
and a house-warming at the Schniiedells is confidently counted upon, 
which, rumor has it, will serve the double purpose of opening their hos- 
pitable doors and also announcing the engagement of Miss Nettie to Sam 
Balaton. The rumor seems to be well founded, but of course I do not 
vouch for its truth. 

Angel Island is also once more coming to the front, and the announce- 
ment of a series of afternoon receptions, to be given by the officers and 
their wives now stationed there, has been received with much pleasure by 
all those whose memories retain recollections of the charming parties 
given there in the past. The first of the series took place last Saturday 
afternoon, which, under the circumstances, may be considered quite a 
success. The earlier hours of the day were bright and pleasant, though 
cool, but the afternoon clouded over, and ere the McPherson had returned 
to the city with her precious load the rain was once more upon us. The 
headquarters at the Island were tastefully dressed with greens and bunt- 
ing, and dancing was indulged in for an hour or more. Two more 
receptions are announced for next month, and, the weather proving pro- 
pitiouB, it goes without aayiug that they will be very enjoyable little 
parties. 

The vexed question of receiving on New Year's Day has been settled 
in favor of keeping open doors, although, I believe, it has been decided, 
by a number of ladies, that the extensive and expensive preparations of 
former years be this year done away with, and the receptions, there- 
fore, be of a more informal character, and there is little doubt that they 
will also be far more enjoyable for that reason. Quite a number intend 
spending the day at Monterey, aud some have already departed in that 
directioo. Among them are Mr., Mrs. and Miss Tubbs, the Maynards 
and Miss Houston, Miss Pacheco, Miss Ivers, Miss Grace Jones, etc., 
who all form one large party. But the custom of receiving, when not 
abused, is a pleasant one, aud though its abolition is often threatened, I 
do not think it will be lightly given up, let dissatisfied people say what 
they may to the contrary. 

Monday wa3 a gala night at the Baldwin, and nearly all of those best 
known in society's upper circles turned out to welcome Miss Abbott's 
return to 'Frisco. Socially, she is well known, and is quite a favorite, 
and will, no doubt, be a good deal entertained by the ladies of her ac- 
quaintance during her stay among us. Opera parties are already being 
arranged, but I scarcely think they will be so popular or numerous as 
when there were fewer events in the gay world than there are likely to 
be in the near future. Apropos of musical sounds, the final Philhar- 
monic Concert of the season takes place next week, when it is hoped that 
not only the weather, but the attendance, will make amends for their bad 
behavior on former occasions, and that, for once, the hearts of the mu- 
sicians will be gladdened with fair skies and full benches. 

Mrs. Walter Dean's many friends will be glad to hear that she is rap- 
idly convalescing after her serious illness, and will soon be her charming 
self again. Mr. Peter Donahue has returned from his Eastern trip, and 
Mr. E. J. Coleman has just departed in that direction, and the probabil- 
ities are that the rest of the Gwin family will ere long join the Dr. in 
Washington. 

Quite a number of our residents are making preparations for a visit to 
the World's Fair, now being held at|New Orleans, many of them timing 
their visit so as to include the Mardi Gras festival, which promises to be 
an unusually grand affair this year. Mr. and Mrs. Clark Crocker and 
Miss Fanny are among those who intend leaving for there next month, 
and during their absence their daughter, Mrs. Green, will occupy the 
parental mansion on Sutter street. Felix. 



Hon. H. T. Hazard and wife are stopping at the Palace. Mr. Haz- 
ard is a candidate for the Speakership of the Assembly, and, from what 
we know of him, will do justice to the position in the event of his being 
elected. All the southern papers, both Republican and Democratic, 
indorse him. 



FEMALE HEAD-GEAR A SUGGESTION. 
Again the atatcly bonnot pmudly lifu Ita lofty and rpi 
far above the topknot of the lady wh<> waan It, < Crowded with 

plumes and ribbons in all colors imaginable, it |« gorgeou* to look : upon. 
Possibly it may be a little tnoonveoienl I ■ aaty of 

Its expanded and elevated glory ta mora than a compensation foi 
On oar atreeta ita many-colored decorations wave In thebi 

i branches of the traditional tree in which the cradle uf Infantile 
sun.- waa rooked to destruction. In church, concert hall, theati 
general assembly the bonnet asserts its right to stand erect En front of all 

wlm may Be so unlucky as to sit behind it. It intercepts their views, 
and proclaims itself of more importance than preacher, singer or actor. 
Perched high upon the head of its wearer, it witnesses to everybody in 
Bight the talent and taste of its builder and the probable extent of the 
milliner's bill. Persons behind it wish it were as transparent as the char- 
ity of its wearer. They might be willing to compromise on the opening 
of a few peep-holes through the foliage. Hardly any flower-garden, 
grove or thicket, or flock of birds of plumage, is so closely set with over- 
growth or feathers that there is not a possibility of seeing the outer world 
through some opening; but the new fashionable hat or bonnet, from its 
nethermost framework to its topmost decoration, is hopelessly opaque. 
There is no chance for a view through it, and the only hope of seeing 
past it, or around it, is that its owner or supporter may bow her head or 
dodge out of the way, and for an instant leave the path of vision unob- 
structed. Were the lady to elevate over her head a parasol, or to attach to 
her shoulders a section of board fence, the view of people in the rear of her 
could not be more thoroughly cut off. There is no immediate hope that 
the hat or bonnet will abate one jot or tittle of its present vast elevation. 
We can only make suggestions about the habits of bonnets. In the cities 
of the old world, when ladies enter the theatre, they remove their bonnets 
or hats and leave them in the cloak-room, receiving a check therefor. To 
do this in this city would be a great innovation, but it would receive the 
best sentiment of " now I lay me down to sleep " from the men folks. 
There are other ways of reform open to feminine head-gear. The floral 
decorations which magicians suddenly bring out of hats, present a practi- 
cal solution. These collapse with a touch, and pack into a compass .of 
microscopic compactness. Touch them again, and they unfold to the 
fullest extent desired. Let the ladies insist upon hat decorations of this 
sort. Then, at a signal, the whole floral forest in a theatre or church 
would collapse and be out of the way. When the play is over or the ser- 
mon ended, pronounce the presto, and all will be decorated again in a 
jiffy. We charge nothing extra for this wisdom. 

WHY THE MATCH WAS BROKEN OFF. 

Society has been all agog, for a week or two past, at the sudden 
breaking off of the engagement between the son of one of our million- 
aires and a prominent society young lady, whose voice has often been 
heard in our midst. Quite by accident I happened to stumble across a 
clue to the breach which, on being followed up, developed into quite an 
interesting story. 

It appears that the young lady has been visiting at the couutry-house 
of one of our prominent California statesmen, situated in one of the 
lower counties. The visit was brought to a sudden termination under 
the following circumstances : About 12 o'clock, one nigh*-, the said st vtea- 
man was reading in his library, when the door opened and the form of 
his accomplished visitor, clad in a simple robe de unit, approached him. 
The Senator was aghast, but, summoning all his courage, he ordered the 
young lady, in a most peremptory manner, to retire to her apartment. 
Upon this, the fair-one's eyes opened, and a murmured " where am I " 
escaped her lips. The Senator, however, thought it was too thin, and 
insisted upon an immediate retirement. Perhaps this prompt and de- 
cisive action upon bis part was necessary, as his wife was seated in the 
next room, separated by simple curtains, and was a witness of the whole 
proceeding. The result was a hasty retirement upon the part of society's 
brightest ornament, a packing of trunks in the morning and a return to 
the city. 

Both parties give a different version of the affair. The lady says that 
the gentleman made improper advances to her, and he, on the other 
hand, states that the above is correct, and, bad it not been for the accusa- 
tion of improper conduct upon his part, nothing would have been suid. 
The two ladies met on the street the other day, and the following was the 
conversation : 

Miss : " Indeed, Mrs. , it is not as you think." 

Mrs. : " Madam, can I not believe the evidence of my own senses ?" 

Anyhow, the engagement between the young lady and the son of a mil- 
lionaire is off. a. B. 0. 







^ tf»**' d*°» frff 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Jan. 3, 1885. 



A SACRED WREATH. 
By Jos. W. Wlnans. 

To tell what charms thy spotleas bouI gave birth; 

To Bound thy virtues and proclaim thy worth; 

To trace the living beauties of thy mind, 

Illumed by genius and by taste refined — 

Be this our theme— sung by the odorous breath 

Of flowerets woven in a sacred wreath. 

Well might thy beauty's praise the verse adorn, 

Thou lovelier than the rosy-fingered morn! 

But nobler ornament our strains invite — 

The transient spurning for the Infinite. 

Then gathered be those emblem flowers that tell 

Of soul charms lasting as themselves are frail. 

Yon Violet, 1 blooming in sequestered fields, 

Where Mignonette 2 its fragrant incense yields, 

And bold Valeriana cradled in the Btorm, 

A glowing nucleus for our circlet form. 

Thou, Passion Flower, 4 whose fragrant petals show 

The mortal anguish of a Saviour's woe; 

Thou, Mallow,5 purple tenant of the moor, 

To wealth a joy, a blessing to the poor; 

And thou, pure Snowdrop, 6 whose tenacious breath 

Still lives, like Hope, when all around is death — 

In linked fondness your fair forms enchain ; 

Ye, the twin graces of the floral train! 

Where placid ocean woo3 the mossy shore, 

Its azure bosom vext by storms no more, 

The blushing Sea Pink7 opes her roseate dyes, 

Like gold clouds floating on the evening skies; 

High bends above the mountain's beetling arch, 

Crowned with the nodding, melancholy Laroh:8 

Thou Sea Pink's flower, thou Larch's sable spray, 

Torn struggling from your parent stems away, 

Come unreluctant, join the flowery throng, 

And though ye die in nature, live in song! 

Come Night Shade, name incongruous, Bitter Sweet;* 

Come brilliant Star of BethlehemIO replete 

With golden beams of incense, not of fire ; 

Come Coriander.ii redolent of ire ! 

Far from man's haunts, with mantling Ivyl2 Bpread, 

A crumbling ruin rears its hoary head ; 

Here tangled shrubs along th' uncultured soil, 

(That rank clod channeled by no ploughshare's toil) 

Neath densest Bhade where sunlight never smiled 

Grow unrestrained, the firstlings of the wild ! 

Hither at dead of night the sorceress steals, 

While the pale moon mysterious light reveals, 

For Vervatn13— dug 'mid such unhallowed rite — 

The very night bird screameth with affright ; 

Vervain we cull, and Ivy, from those glades, 

Our simple search no incantation needs. 

Through the green bosom of a lovely vale 

A winding Btreamlet draws its silver trail : 

At dewy eve in its pellucid wave 

Her stainless form the LotusI* loves to lave: 

O'er the shorn bank, with cunning science form'd. 

By nature gifted and by art adorned, 

A beauteous garden spreads, with sweets profuse 

Alive, and glowing with a thousand hues : 

AcaciaIB blooms, and tremulous perfume 

Steals in delicious languor from the Broom ;16 

Near where maintains her undisputed reign 

Yon lordly Rose, 17 the sovereign of the plain : 

There glow her charms with conscious pride elate, 

Soon to be smitten by the stroke of fate ! 

There proudly o'er the soil with verdure drest 

The flaunting Lily13 rears her stately crest, 

Now bends to catch the pensive zephyr's sigh, 

Now scents the sportive breeze that idles by, 

And lifts her snowy chalice to the view, 

A glowing goblet for the glittering dew : 

There Jasmines19 undiminished fragrance shed, 

There the sweet DaisySO hides her modest head, 

While o'er the latticed arbors thickly twine 

Bright Honeysuckles, 21 breathing scents divine; 

These from their loved homes reft, in sunny dale, 

No more shall wanton with the amorous gale; 



Twined in its foliage dense our votive wreath 

Demands their charms, demands their balmy breath. 

Now in the forest's deep, sequestered, shade, 

Where Nature, in her majesty displayed, 

Upholds primeval grandeur, the sublime 

Stamped on the hoary monuments of time ; 

Mark yonder giant Oak,22 around whose head 

High as the heaven the lightning's flame has played ; 

O'er whose time-honored, and majestic, brow 

Th« thunders have in ages past — as now — 

Muttered in vain their terrible alarms, 

Nor rived one splinter from its mighty arms ; 

Which, spreading far and wide its massy form 

O'er a vast circuit, has defied the storm, 

And faced destruction with undaunted front, 

And borne for centuries the fearful brunt 

Of raging elements, nor ever quailed 

'Neath the collected terrors that assailed ! 

But stretching forth its huge gigantic limbs, 

With each revolving year it higher climbs 

Towards that heaven which it dares to scale — 

Mocking the wrath of tempest and of gale ! 

Aye, mark it spread aloft, colossal, great, 

Its aged arms, in venerable state, 

As though it were a living, breathing priest 

Of Nature's temple, sounding its behests— 

In words of awe, in tones of solemn dread- - 

To things around inanimate and dead. 

From that grand Oak our chaplet needs a spray; 

Hence let us bear it, let us hence away. 

In that once gifted, once enlightened land, 

Where the Omnipotent with bounteous hand 

Diffused His copious blessinge far and wide 

In gushing streams that knew no ebbing tide; 

Until, entangled in the snares of Hell, 

It braved high Heaven and impiously fell ; 

Cursed with the horror of a brooding night 

So dark that darkness 'self to it were light ; 

A long, long Dight of outward, inward gloom, 

Where mind still slumbers in its ebon tomb ; 

How graceful there -the chaste Aoanthos23 waves, 

Profusely curling round the bridal graves : 

Acanthds, with romantic legends blent, 

That unto Art a new-born feature lent. 

For thee beloved, this chaste exotic comes, 

And in thy coronal superbly blooms ;— 

Blooms side by side, in dignity sublime, 

With the meek native of a sunnier clime, — 

Sweet Eglantine24— within whose rosy cells, 

'Tib fabled that a gentle spirit dwells ; 

By whose soft hues the eye is strangely rapt; 

By whose delicious breath the sense is steeped; 

'Neath whose straDge spell the "real" fades away 

Lost in imagination's subtle sway : 

Well may the poet love thee, floweret fair. 

There is none lovelier, none with charms more rare ! 

Now round the Reed25 let Veron'ica26 twine ;— 

Emblems significant of gifts divine. 

Let the bright garland one more grace display 

From yonder Wallflower27 that skirts the way. 

'Tis done; — the grateful, gladsome task is o'er ; — 

Together now the volumed odors pour ; 

Together now the pliant stalks entwine; 

Together now the crowding leaflets join; 

Together now the blushing hues combine ; 

And in one circling chaplet softly shine : 

A "Sacred Wreath," its gathered beauties glow, 

Superb tiara on thy snowy brow ! 

Still let it bloom, embalmed by canning art, 

While the warm blood yet throbs within thy heart ; 

And round the column of thy marble tomb, 

Twine its fair form and fling its rich perfume. 



1. Modesty. 8. 

2. Qualities of mind that 9. 

surpass bodily per- 10. 

fections. II. 

3. Accommodating dispo- 12. 

sition. 13. 

4. Faith. 14. 
6. Beneficence. 15. 

6. Hope. 16. 

7. Sympathy. 17. 



Courage. 

Truth. 

Purity. 

Concealed merit. 

Friendship. 

Enchanting graces. 

Eloquence. 

Affection. 

Humility. 

Love. 



Majesty. 

Amiability. 

Innocence. 

Kindness. 

Hospitality. 

Fine Arts. 

Poetry. 

Music. 

Faithfulness 

Fidelity in misfortune.. 



Jut 3, 1885. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



THE MAIDEN AUNT TO HER NIECE. 

All. Vfs | 1 at ii old Mid lonely, 

An-l tin- tin.- hu K-u mine eye ; 
I live in the doftd put "iily. 

In tin tight <>f i! D6 by. 

uhes tin- ibadom grow long: 

Life'* tlay is drawing to BVflDJODg. 

Yet, whttO I* boshed worhi is sleeping. 
In bright dnuu I am young Again, 

And ■irifuj my feet are flying 

T>> the Boaoda of ■ joyous strain; 

U'iih wilil Boating trasses I qaeen it there, 

As in the dead days, when my face was fair. 

When these thin pray locks were glancing 
In the sun. Living waves of gold, 

Ami these tired, dim eyes were dancing 
With mischief and mirth untold. 

And there was oue lover — but let that go — 

The night draweth near ; it is better so. 

Well. I have no wish to linger. 

For I have grown weary, love, 
And a shadowy, solemn finger 

Seems ever to point above. 
There true balm awaitetb the wounded breast ; 
After the fret and the fever — rest. 



-Truth. 



AN IMPORTANT DISCOVERY. 

The long-sought process by which aluminium metal may be cheaply 
prod need for use iu the mechanic arts has at last said to have been found. 
William Frishmuth, a chemist of Philadelphia, and a pupil of Wohler, 
who discovered the metal, is the discoverer. He has been working for 28 
years to Bolve the problem, and has now secured basic patents throughout 
moat "f the civilized world for his process, which, when worked in a large 
plant, will turn out practically unlimited quantities of the metal, at a 
cost "f about $1.26 a pound, or one-twelfth the present price. Aluminium 
is made only from its oxide, alumina. This is found everywhere, there 
being more in the ground than there is of iron. The process heretofore 
employed to obtain the aluminium from the oxide has been by treating 
its chloride with metallic sodium as a reducing agent. The great diffi- 
culties experienced, however, in handling this dangerous material, and its 
very great post— about S3 per pound — have made the process too difficult 
And expensive. In the process employed by Frishmuth, instead of using 
metallic sodium he uses a vapor produced or generated in suitable retorts 
from a mixture of carbonate of sodium or other suitable compounds of 
sodium and carbon, or some other reducing agent. This sodium vapor is 
made to react upon the aluminous materials, the product being the metal 
aluminium. 

In the old process, known as the De Ville, to produce 20 pounds of 
aluminium, 50 pounds of metallic sodium, costing not less than 3150, are 
required. By that of Frishmuth, 115 pounds of carbonate of sodium, 
coating 1 cent per pound, are used. The uses of the metal are almost il- 
limitable. Being only about one quarter the weight of other metals, it 
will be substituted for these in countless ways. For lightning-rods, tele- 
graph and electric wires, it will come into use, as, with the exception of 
silver, it is the best conductor of electricity known. It is non-corrosive 
and will not tarnish, and is expected to eventually supplant the other 
metals for domestic uses, and it is also anticipated that, owing to these 
qualities, it will supersede the use of brass. It will also be used for sub- 
sidiary coins. Specimens of these have been made, and, after handling 
for months, show no signs of wear and are as bright as the day they were 
struck. As an alloy, however, it will prove of the greatest value, 
especially when combined with silver and copper, giving to these metals 
its non-corrosive and non-tarnishing qualities, and greatly increasing their 
tensile strength. As showing what has been done at the Philadelphia 
works, a handsome collection of the metal in bulk, and articles manufac- 
tured from it and its alloys, has been prepared and sent to New Orleans 
for exhibition at the coming Exposition. 

The Treasury cellars at Washington, we are told, contain at the 
present time a great many valuable diamonds and other precious stones, 
valued at several hundred thousand dollars. There is, among other 
things, a small bottle, six inches high, tilled with diamonds, rubies, pearls, 
sapphires, and other stones, some mounted in gold and others not mount- 
ed at all. The origin of this treasure dates from 1839, when a present of 
precious stones was sent to President Van Buren by the Imam of Mus- 
cat, in recognition of some service rendered him by an American vessel. 
As the Constitution of the United States makeB it illegal for a President 
to receive any present or decoration from any foreign Power, and as on 
the other hand it might have seemed discourteous to return the present, 
the President ordered that the jewels should be lodged in the Treasury. 
They hive remained there ever since, and similar presents sent to subse- 
quent Presidents have been relegated to the same place. As the value of 
these treasures are now very considerable, the question of selling them by 
public auction as unclaimed property has frequently been mooted, but the 
fear of giving offense to the donors has hitherto prevented Congress from 
coming to any decision upon the point. 



At the rink a young maiden named Kate 
Was quite rapidly learning to skate ; 

When, becoming too rash, 

She went down with a crash, 
And the "dull thud " was heard in the next State. 

— Norristown Herald. 

A Complete Table. — No table is complete without sauces, but they 
should be the best, such as the King-Morse Canning Co. are putting up. 

Grand concerts in the Park on Saturday and Sunday, under the aus- 
pices of the Market-street Cable Railway Company. 



BANKS. 

LONDON, PARIS AND AMERICAN BANK (LIMITED), 

205 Sunsomo Street* 

Authorized Capital 85,000,000 

Nabtfcrlbetl Capital 2,500 ooo 

**»•*> l f P 2,000,000 

DATED OAHN Manager | EUGENE MEYER Sub-Manager 

Head Ofllce.-9aiid 10TOKENHUUSE YARD, LOTH BURY, L0N1" >\ 
AfrentH.— NEW YORK: Agency of the Loudon, Paris ami American Bank 
(Limited), -16 Exchange Flaw, PARIS: Messrs. Lazard KriTesACte, lOKueStc. Cvcile 
Draw Direct uii the Principal Cities of the United States, Great Britain, Ireland 
France, Germany, Russia, Austria, Italy, Belgium, Holland, Spain, Switzerland 
China, Japan, Australia, Uentr.il and South America. COMMERCIAL and TRAV- 
ELERS' CREDITS issued, available throughout the world. COLLECTIONS MADE 
at current rates of exchange. Issue CERTIFICATES OF DEPOSIT and receive Do- 
posits on open accounts. BULLION and FOREIGN COINS bought and sold. 

BANK OF BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

Incorporated by Royal Charter.- Capital paid up, 81,730,- 
000, with power to increase to $10,000,000. Reserve Fund, $250,000. Southeast 
corner California and Sansome streets. Head Office— 28 Cornbili, London 
Branches— Portland, Oregon; Victoria and New Westminster, British Columbia. 

This Bank transacts a Goneral Banking Business. Accounts opened Buhject to Check 
and Special Deposits received. Commercial Credits granted available in all parts of 
the world. Approved Bills discounted and advances made on good collateral security 
Draws direct at current rates upon its Head Office and Branches, and upon its Agents 
as follows : 

New York, Chicago and Canada— Bank of Montreal; Liverpool— North and South 
Wales Bank ; Scotland —British Linen Company ; Ireland— Bank of Iroland ■ Mex- 
ico and South America— London Bank of Mexico and South America ; China and 
Japan— Chartered Bank of India, Australia and China ; Australia and New Zealand 
—Bank of Australasia, Commercial Banking Company of Sydney, English Scottish 
and Australian Chartered Bank. 

" ~ , THE BANK OF CALIFORNIA, SAN FRANCISCO. 

Capital $3,000,000. 

WM.ALVORD President 

THOMAS BROWN, Cashier | B. MURRAY, Jr., Ass't Cashier 

Aqbnts : 

New York, Agency of the Bank of Calfornia; Boston, Tremont National Bank, 
Cbicago, Union National Bank ; St. Louis, Boatman's Saving Bank ; New Zealand 
the Bank of New Zealand. Correspondent iu London, Messrs. N. M. Rothschild & 
Sons. Correspondents in India, China, Japan and Australia, . 

The Bank has Agencies at Virginia City, and Correspondents in all the princi- 
pal Mining Districts and Interior Towns of the Pacifi Coast. 

Letters of Credit issued, available in all parts of the world. Draw direct on New 
York, Boston, Chicago, St. Louis, New Orleans, Denver, Salt Lake, Cincinnati, 
Portland, O., Los Angeles, London, Dublin, Paris, Berlin, Bremen, Hamburg' 
Frankfort-on-the-Main, Antwerp, Amsterdam, Copenhagen, Stockholm, Christiana! 
Locarno, Melbourne, Sydney, Auckland, Hongkong, Shanghai, Yokohama, Genoa, 
and all cities in Italy and Switzerland. 

THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Paid up Capital 81,500,000, Gold. President, Daulel Cal- 
lagnan. Vice-President, GEORGE A. LOW; Cashier, E. D. MORGAN- 
Assistant Cashier, GEO. W. KLINE. 

Directors.— D. Callaghan, C. G. Hooker, Peter Donahue, James Phelan, James 
Moffitt, N. Van Bergen, James H. Jennings, George A. Low. 

CORRESPONDENTS.— Loudon : Bank of Montreal, No. 9 Birchin Lane, Lom- 
bard street. Dublin : Provincial Bank of Ireland. Hamburg : HeBse, Neumau 
& Co. Paris: Hottinguer & Co. New York: National Bank of Commerce. Bos- 
ton : BlackBtone National Bank. Chicago : PirBt National Bank. This Bank is pre- 
pared to transact a general Banking business. Deposits in Gold, Silver and Currency 
received subject to check or on special deposit. Exchange for sale on the principal 
cities of the United States, Great Britain, Ireland and the Continent. Commercia 
Credits issued available in Europe, Chii.a and Japan. Collections attended to and 
prompt returns made at the lowest market rates of Exchange. June 28. 

THE CALIFORNIA SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY, 

N. W. Corner Eddy and Powell streets, San Francisco. 

Loans made on city and country real estate at current rates. Term and ordinary 
deposits received. Dividends paid in January and July, 
Last dividend, paid in January, 4.50 per cent. 

DIRECTORS— David Farquharson (President) , Robert K. Bunker Vice-President), 
John Bain (Treasurer), John Eaaton (Surveyor), J. F. Cowdery (Attorney), A. C. 
Corbett, Edward Farrell, Joseph R. Wilcox, Thomas Downing, Charles D. Furquhar- 
son, Chas Lux. [July 12. J Vernon Campbell, Secretary. 

LONDON AND SAN FRANCISCO BANK, LIMITED. 

Capital, $2,100,000. 

San Francisco Office, 424 California street; London Office, 
22 Old Broad street. Portland Branch, 48 First Street. 
Manager ARTHUR SCRIVENER. 

Assistant Manager, WILLIAM STEEL. London Bankers— Bank of England and 
London Joint Stock Bank; New York, Drexel, Morgan & Co.; Boston, Third Na- 
tional Bank. This Bank is prepared to transact all kinds of General Banking 
and Exchange Business in London and San Francisco, and between said cities 
and all parts of the world. June 9. 

THE ANGLO-CALIFORNIAN BANK, LIMITED. 

N.E. Cor. Sansome and Pine Streets. 

London Office, 3 Angel Conrt ; New York Agreuts, J. w. Sol- 
igman & Co., 21 Broad street. Authorized Capital Stock, SG.OOO.OGO. Will re- 
ceive Deposits, open Accounts, make Collections, buy and sell Exchange and Bullion, 
loan Money, and issue Letters of Credit available throughout the world. 

FRED. F. LOW, ( „„„„ „„ 

IGN. STEINHART, j- uana g erfl - 

P. N. Ltlibntbal. Cashier. Sept. 13. 

THE NEVADA BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO. 

Capital Paid TJp $3,000,000. 

Agency at New York, 62 Wall street. 

Agency at Virginia, Nev. 

Buys and sells Exchange and Telegraphic Transfers. Issues Commercial and Trav- 
elers' Credits. Nov. 8 



SAN FRANC] SCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Jan. 3, 1885. 



PLEASURE'S WAND. 

* We Obey no Wand but Pleasure's.'*— Tom Moore. 

Of all sunny Italy's composers, not one can claim so prominent a 
place amongst the great tone poets as Rossini. There are few musicians, 
either of Italy or of any other country, who have ever enjoyed such a 
degree of popularity as the Swan of Pesaro. At one time his music 
solely occupied nearly all the operatic stages of Europe, and none other 
would be listened to. Less learned and elaborately constructed, with 
fewer pretensions to all that is grand, majestic or severe, with nothing 
that is dry or difficult to understand, nothing suggestive of vast study, 
his music differs widely from that of the classical composers, and this was 
probably the secret of Rossini's popularity. His music appealed to the 
multitude, not alone to the educated class, and his great purpose seemed 
to be to please, and not to try his listeners with learned modulations, or 
masterly illustrations of his learning. The very carelessness and hurry 
of composition that marked his scores gave to them an air of freedom, of 
independence from classical conservatism that drew the popular approval. 
His opera of Semiramide, brought out at the Fenice, in Veoice, Febru- 
ary 3d, 1823, was not as much liked as its predecessors. It was written 
with more care and deliberation, and with less careless spontaniety. But 
with the lapse of time it has come to be considered one of the finest of 
his works. The subject is a sombre one. The score is full of rich num- 
bers- -the quartet {which must have been Verdi's inspiration when he 
composed the Miserere), the appearance of Ninus, the final trio, a scene 
so short and so dramatic, and the brilliant cavatina with chorus. In 
instrumentation it is brilliant and sonorous. Since the first production 
of Semiramide, sixty years ago, all the moat distinguished soprani of the 
day have loved to appear in that work. Semiramide, the role, which has 
been so attractive to these singers, requires both dramatic and florid sing- 
ing. But the possession of vocal force and dignity is an absolute neces- 
sity in the singer attempting the part. 

* * * * » 
Emma Abbott is totally devoid of those qualities, and her attempt — 

for such it is— to sing the role «»f Babylon's queen is an unfortunate one. 
With a light voice, a method that iB lacking in imaginative effect, and a 
personality that is modern and practical, she destroys the illusion, with- 
out which such a character as Semiramide can not impress us. Her sing- 
in" is delicate and sweet in cantabile passages, and in the fioriture of 
" Bel Raggio" she vocalizes with considerable ease and fair accuracy, but 
her physical inability to musically characterize the part prevents her ef- 
fort from possessing artistic merit. For the lighter form of operatic mu- 
sic, and principally for ballad operas, she is sufficiently well qualified to 
gain popular approval, and the desire to substitute for that, the heavy 
dramatic school, can but detract from her reputation, and antagonize a 
public taste wedded to the more simple idea of opera. 

» * - * * 

The great contralti have all found in Arsace a congenial role. It is in 
this that Scalchi recently established her great reputation. Miss Annan- 
dale has a voice of sufficient force and volume to sing the music, but I do 
not find in her an intelligent and consistent application of her vocal gifts 
to the part. She sings it as she would the contralto role of a ballad opera, 
with its detached numbers. Arrayed in a costume, which in its 
suggestion of the modern burlesque is not compatible with such a char- 
acter as Arsace, she sings her numbers to the audience, and in the inter- 
vals lapses into complete indifference. 

* * * * * 

The celebrated duet between Semiramide and Arsace is sung with me- 
lodic sweetness and a harmonic merging of the two voices. 

* * * * » 

The role of Idreno is an unimportant one, but it affords Fabrini an 
opportunity of developing the fact that his voice has gained both volume 
and sweetness since last he sang to us. 

***** 

As in most of the performances of this troupe last season, the artistic 
Baccess <>f this performance is Campobello. His operatic training 
has been in the Italian school, and there is a phase of idealism 
to his manner, that is in strong contrast to the materialism of Abbott 
and the others. The music of Assur is difficult to sing. Rossini de- 
lighted in giving his male singers florid music. There are few baritones 
who possess enough flexibility of voice and ease of execution to sing the 
running passages of Assur. Campobello's voice fc as lost in firmness of 
and smoothness, since last year, and he sings this music hardly as 
well as he once undoubtedly has been able to do, but it is sufficiently 
well done to deserve praise. 

* * * * 

The chorus sing with the vim and dash that made it so agreeable a 
feature of the former performances. The orchestra played well under 
the evidently intelligent direction of Signor Tomasi. The smoothness 
and precision, which is a strong recommendation of this company, is as 
noticeable as ever. The version of the opera used is a sadly mangled 
one. As arranged in the libretto sold, it is badly cut; as played on/Monday 
evening, it suffered still more, being shorn of several important scores. 
The scenery used is most ridiculous in its incongruity. Without being 
a stickler for chronological accuracy, a difference of several thousand 
years iu matters of architecture may furnish one with excuse for fault 
finding. In one scene, Semiramide alludes to a "paper" in Arsace's 
bands. I may be wrong, but I do not think that the article was known 
for some little time subsequent to the date of the action. 

***** 

In Martha the troupe is heard to better advantage. Flotow's music is 
light and frivolous, aud voices of average quality can sing with good effect 
the familiar airs. Abbott is a very taking Martha. She is full of life 
and spirit. She sings well throughout the opera, excepting in her man- 
ner of rendering the "Last Rose of Summer." The exaggeration of 
pathos and the intensity of sentiment with which she endows this ballad, 
makes of it a broad burlesque. Fabrini has improved greatly in a year. 
The quality of his voice is purer and clearer. His " M'Appari " is a very 
sweet bit of singing. Miss Annandale is a buxom Nancy. Campobello's 
Plunkett has but few equals. The spirit and dash with which he sings 
and acts the part make of it the striking feature of the performance. 



In a measure, Campobello bears the same relation to this troupe that 
Giannini did to the Cambiaggi, etc., organization. In Semiramide, Mar- 
tha and Miynon — the three operas performed in time for this week's re- 
view—he has been in each the artistic gem around which the others have 
clustered. His Lotario is admirably sung. The opening aria is delivered 
with faultless phrasing, and with a remarkable purity of tone. If voice 
is a divine gift it should have been inseparable from life. It fills us with 
pity to listen to what was once a noble voice— Buch as Castle's. If the 
man was an indifferent singer be would not be tolerated, but with a per- 
fect method he is respected for the past of his bright career. The music 
of Frederick is very well sung by Miss Annandale. The vivacity of her 
acting would be more effective but for the lady's physical disqualifica- 
tions for male attire. 

***** 

As Mignon Emma Abbott touches the maximum of her operatic abil- 
ity. With the exception of the few bars of declamatory music at the 
commencement of the third act, in which she calls for the chateau's de- 
struction, she sings the part well. The defects of her voice and method 
are all laid bare, and yet she satisfies you. The thinness of her notes are 
noticed in the beautiful prayer of the last act, and yet she sings it well. 
The crudity of her execution is apparent in the aria before the glass, and 
still Bhe pleases you. In this role she attains a point where her qualities 
and defects are in perfect balance. In the second act her sprightliness in 
male costume is obscured by the same misfortune of figure that is attach- 
ed to Miss Annandale. 

***** 

Laura Bellini has a voice which, in quality, is similar to Rosewald's. 
It is rich and round, but vailed in tone. Her method is amateurish, and 
her execution heavy and labored. She sings the Polacca with a certain 
dash, attained by a slurring of its florid features. The trills are imitated 
by a vigorous tremolo, and the runs are totally lacking in legato. In the 
quieter passages her voice develops its good qualities with most pleasing 
effect. In appearance Miss Bellini is prepossessing. 

The fourth concert of the Philharmonic Society is announced for next 
Wednesday afternoon. The four orchestral selections to be played are all 
new to the public of this city. The fifth number of the programme is 
Spohr's violin concerto, No. 9, which will be played by Henry Heyman. 
Besides his claims upon lovers of music as an artist, Mr. Heyman de 
serves well for his prominent part in the development of orchestral music 
in San Francisco. 

***** 

Ben Clark has never sung so sweetly as he is now doing with Emerson's 
company at the California. With Silvo, the juggler, Dnncan, tbe ven- 
triloquist, the Martens and Wood, the entertainment of the troupe is 
a most enjoyable one. 

* * * * * 

The different rigs in which Charley Reed attires himself, form a series 
of grotesque ideas that cannot be well matched. Franz Wetter is singing, 
in good voice and good form, some favorite selections. 

***** 

The Leavitt Company close their three weeks' season to-morrow even- 
ing, at the Bush-street Theatre. On Monday Ben Cotton, an old-timer 
among old-timers, appears at this theatre. He has abandoned, I believe, 
the burnt cork stage, aud appears with a daughter of his in melodrama. 
There are several very successful novelties at hand at other places of 
amusement. 

No other theatre having seen fit to offera Christmas spectacle, the Tivoli 
is reaping the benefit of its monopoly in the matter. Prince North Pole 
is well mounted. Costumes and scenery are bright and attractive. Helen 
Dingeon sings a few things charmingly. 

Mr. A. Waldteufel has just published the " Memories Waltzes," by 
J. V. Geary. 

BALDWIN THEATRE. 

Secure Seats Early. Last Time of these Operas. Overwhelming Success! 

EMMA ABBOTT OBAND ENGLISH OPEBA COMPANY! 

Abbott, Bellini, Armamlale, Hindle, Castle, Fabrini, Tayliapietra, 

Campobello, Broderick, Allen, Ward, Tomasi. 

LAST WEEK OF THE FOLLOWING OPERAS: 
Monday— (Three Prime Dunne), MIGNON. Tuesday— MARITANA. Wednesday 
Matinee— Popular Prices, 50c. and 15c, BOHEMIAN GIRL. Wednesday Night — 
BARBER OF SEVILLE. Thursday-FAUST. Friday (Only Time) -KING FOR 
ADvY. Saturday Matinee -EMMA ABBOTT in TRAViATA. Saturday Night— 
IL TROVATORE. Jan. 3. 

CALIFORNIA THEATRE. 

WM. EMERSON Lessee and Manager 

18S5-HAPPY NEW YEAR!— 1S35. The First Performance of the New Year of 

EMERSON'S" "WORLD'S FAIR COMPANY! 

GRAND MATINEE TO-DAY AT 2 P. M. : : PROGRAMME ALL NEW! 
Free Outdoor Exhibition at 1:30 p. m., and at 7:30 p. m. 

POPULAR PRICES: 
75, 50, 25c; Matinee, 50 and 25c, Nothing extra. Jan. 3. 



BUSH-STREET THEATRE. 

Ma. M. B. LEAVITT. Lessee and Manager I Mr. JAY RIAL Acting Manager 

HAPPY NEW YEAR! Gala Matinee at 2 p. m. To-Day. 
LEAVITT' S NEW GIGANTIC SPECIALTY COMPANY I 
An Unprecedented Triumph! A Glo ious Programme for the Last Week! New 
Acts! New Songs! New Music! TheTtVO BARNEYS in their Screaming Farce, 
M ALONE YS VISIT! 
Monday, January 5th— Reappearance, after an absence of 12 Tears, of the Favor- 
ite Comedian, MR. BEN COTTON, in his Latest Great Success, TRUE DEVOTION. 



Jan. 3, 1885. 



ALI FORM A A I > V K RT 1 8 E K. 



SPORTING. 



Ttao Ksplnosa Clab. We have alw.iy-* advocated tbo osteblfebmont 
of clulw Uir presttrvini* game. The State has done very [Ittlt t<> eoforoo 
the if. t me lawn, and practically nothing towards introducing game birds. 
Tho California Fish (.\uuuiissinn, with the liiniced fuada at tta disposal, 
ha* shown a k'"oti deal of energy in tbe past, but there is more than 
enough work fur it ahead. The E-fpiiciBa Club ha« been reoently formed, 
nud Include! fifty member*, many of whom are known to be thorough 
mnftanen. They have secured a lease of Dspiooev Lake, near Castro- 
ville, in Monterey county. The lake is one and three quarters miles 
loojti with an avrrayo breadth of half a mite, and is from 10 to 41) feet 
deep. It is fed by spring*, and the water if always fresh and good; the 
rise and fall is aboal two feet. In 1*77, 2,500 land locked Salmon were 
pUced in it, and 2,000 Sacramento Perch. In -luce, last year, 34,000 
1 river Trout were put in, and it is proposed to hatch 100,000 more 
daring March next. These fish will be hatched at the Del Monte hatch- 
ery, only a few miles distant. The Club has also secured a lease of Lake 
Merritt, which is within half a mile of Ebpinosa, also some 2,000 acres 
of tuleland, with numerous ponds. Lake Merritt is an excellent feeding 
ground, and furnishes good shooting for swan, ducks, geese and snipe. 
Mallard and teal, both greenwing, and cinnamon breed in the ponds, and 
each season brings flights of migratory canvasback, mallard, gadwell ami 
widgeon in abundance. Five blinds have been built on Lake Merritt, 
three scows with blinds are anchored in Espinosa, and five blinds have 
been put up along the shore. The members have a ranch house, and 
there is a caretaker in charge, and a boat, and boat landing is always 
ready for use. Wild rice from Wisconsin has been imported and planted 
in the lakes, to feed the game. The arrangement of the blinds is so good 
that twenty persons can shoot from them, without being in the way of 
each other. The facilities for reaching the Club's preserves are complete, 
two trains leaving daily by the Southern Pacific Railroad. We wish the 
('lul> every success; such organizations will prevent the country from be- 
ing depleted of game birds, and secure for the future genuine sport. 

Yaohtlng.— Last Sunday the Chispa had a delightful trip from Sauce- 
lito, through Raccoon Straits, and to the Brothers aud back. The party 
on board claim that the breeze was more even and satisfactory than found 
at any time during the regular yachting season. Captain Coalidge, who 
was at the Chispa's helm, states that be found a stronger ebb tide than he 
has stemmed for years. Tbe Whitewing went up the river last Sunday. 
Mr. Lee intends spending his annual holiday amongst the tules, and in 
making pleasant acquaintances with various flights of canvasback. Mr. 
P. James Donahue, the joint owner of the Nellie, has just returned to 
this city, after an extended tour through Europe. During his stay in 
England, Mr. Donahue saw the large fleet of yachts that annually ren- 
dezvous at Cowes, and it is needless to add that he was delighted with 
the number and styles of the yachts. He also did some pleasant sailing 
in the North Sea. Mr. Donahue has been warmly welcomed home. Last 
Saturday the Nellie made a run up to Point San Quentin, and her owners 
did some duck-shooting over the Corte Madera marsh, and returned to 
this city on Sunday night. The sail down by moonlight was most en- 
joyable, and the breeze fresh enough to make every stitch of canvas draw. 
The Nellie will be kept in commission during the Winter months. 

Bicycling. - -The annual meeting of tbe San Francisco Club will be 
held on the 8th inst., when the officers for the coming year will be 
elected. The Club has selected a new, handsome and appropriate uni- 
form. The annual dinner of tbe Club will take place immediately after 
the annual meeting. This gathering is always a jovial one, and 
we anticipate that it will prove exceptionally so this year. The Bay 
City Wheelmen are working like beavers to make a success of the tourna- 
ment which takes place, on the 10th inst., in the Mechanics' Pavilion. 
In addition to the bicycle events, the programme will include a mile 
handicap walking-match. Writing of the programme suggests that the 
managers can make it useful as well as ornamental by printing the colors 
of the competitors. This plan will enable all the audience to tell at a 
glance "who's who." Numbers do not answer well, but distinct colors 
worn by each competitor will enable every one to know at once bow the 
race is going. Doubtless every care will be taken to secure proper cos- 
tumes. At some athletic meetings the competitors display a lack of good 
taste in this regard. We infer that a leading feature of the Tournament 
will be the drill, in which the members are becoming daily more pro- 
ficient. 

Cricket.— The Eoglisb Eleven, now in Australia, are nobly upholding 
the honor of the old country. In November, at Melbourne, they easily 
defeated eleven of Victoria. At the close of the same month, in Sydney, 
they won a match against eleven of New South Wales by four wickets. 
This match was largely attended, 16,000 persons paying for admission on 
one of tbe days. In the provinces, where the eleven have met odds of 
18 and 22, they have been uniformly successful. But the real test of the 
team's strength will come when they meet the Australian Eleven, with 
whom they play three matche?, one each in Sydney, Melbourne and 
Adelaide. 

Rlfle-Shootlng. — The breeze which blew across the range at Shell 
Mound last Sunday was not in favor of accurate shooting. The princi- 
pal event was a 100-shot match at 200 yards between Messrs. Cummings 
and Perkins v. Klein and Carson. Tbe scores were: Cummings 441, Per- 
kins 428-869; Klein 437, Carson 426-863. Close work: 6 points in 400 
shots. This is the second time the winners have defeated the same com- 
petitors, and for the time being decides their claim to first honors. A 
triangular match at 200 yards, 50 shots each, was then fired between 
Chas Carr, who scored 220, E. Hovey 216, and Smith Carr 209. 

Duck-shooting. — The heavy rains just before Christmas scattered the 
birds in all directions. Near Suisun the ponds have overflowed, and 
ducks have wandered off to find fresh pastures. Up the river the same 
story is told. Now we must wait for fine weather to lure them back 
again. In the lower bay marshes the sport has also been poor. Hunters 
who want big bags, and who have plenty of time for the sport, will do 
well to journey to Merced and Tulare counties. The flight is steadily 
moving south, and in the localities named the finest sport is now available. 



Bay Fishing. Daring tl i there aav< 

made at Long Wl a*i, I n have »| - 

peared slnoe tbe late rains, and fortunate anglers who have ! 
oonsider themselves wall paid for the trouble of wait fur the 

sport. Perch, toincods und purees are numerous at the same phi..-. 
wade, ttie man whn supp'fo* bait, rorie, lines, eta, has moved hi 
to a spot opposite tin- landing of the ' lakland boats:. Se alw iy- I 
Bupply of toe necessaries for fishing. 

During the past week three Bobooners belonging to Messrs, J. D. 
Spreckels Jfc Brus . made the fastest time on record from the Hawaiian 
Islands to this port. The three reached here just one day apart On 1 De- 
cember 27th the Consuelo, Capt. Cousins, name in from Honolulu in 10 
days ; on the 28th tbe Bmma Olandlna, Capt. Afadsen, reached here in '.» 

days 20 hours from Hilo ; on the 29th the Unsaiio, Capt. Swift, came int.* 
port in 10 days from K;ilmhii. Such speed is pressing the »teumers tip 
pretty close. 

The Ring.— The fi^'ht between Manning and C'leary, on Tuesday 
ni^ht, appears to have been a genuine contest. Ten rounds were fongnt, 
and until the finish it was not easy to pick out the heat man. Hot nei- 
ther nf them were really in fij-htint,' trim. For once in a long while tho 
public got the worth of its money, Cleary winning tbe fight in the tenth 
round, his opponent not being able to stand when time was nailed, 

Baseball-— A California League has been formed to play at the <~Vn 
tral Park Ground-'. Four clubs are represented — the Stars, Haverlys 
San Franciscos and Occidentals. If the mauagers keep the men in order 
and see that the games are properly conducted, we may fairly antio.ipat ■ 
a good season's play. None of the talent named is of a high order, but 
good enough to sustain the public interest if managed judiciously. 

Rowing.— The crews of the Golden Gate Club, who performed so many 
fouling feats recently, are not satisfied with the result of their barge race. 
It is to be rowed over again, this time not for a trophy, but for coin. The 
club certainly has a weakness fur the chink of J?20 pieces. Tbe date of 
the second trial of speed aud endurance has not yet reached us. 

Wrestling. — Whistler and Cannon are to wrestle catch-as-cafch can 
at the Central Park, on Monday night. Our readers know thoroughly 
well what we think of these matches. We need not add a word now to 
make our opinion more emphatic. 



We have to acknowledge the receipt of a beautiful calendar from 
the New England Life Insurance Company. Each year this company 
gets out something very artistic, and this year's surpasses all other efforts, 
both as regards design and execution. 



China. — The Pacific Mail steamship City of New York, hence Decem- 
ber 31st, carried 25,000 lbs. Ginseng, 4,000 bbls. Flour, 330,000 Cotton 
Sheetings, 100 flasks Quicksilver, etc. 

The great emporium for Japanese Goods is at Marsh & Co.'e, No. 
625 Market street. They have complete facilities for obtaining the best. 

Finest Frozen Oysters, fat, fresh and juicy, 50 cents and 75 cents per 
tin, at C. Toohey's, 604 Market street, opposite New Montgomery. 

Isn't It about time for some of the eloping coachmen to be figuring in 
divorce suits ? 

PHILHARMONIC SOCIETY. 

FOURTH CONCERT I -AT PLATT'S HALL, WEDNESDAY 
AFTERNOON, January 7th, 1885, at 3 o'clock. 

a. PINRIC11S Conductor 

HENRY Hl.YUAN, Soloist. 



Seats on Sale at SUE tMAN, CLAY & GO'S MUSIC HOUSE. 



Jan. 3. 



TIV0LI oPERA HOUSE. 

Eddy street, uear Market.— Kreliug' Bros., Sole Proprietois 
and Managers.— This Evening, and Every Evening until Further Notice, 

Prince North Pole! 

A Grand Operatic Spectacle, abounding with Magnificent Scenery, Sparkling Music, 
Handsome Costumes, Realistic Effects and a Beautiful Transformation Scene, Spe- 
cialties of a refined order will be introduced. 

The Cast will include: Misi Helene Dingeon, Mr. T. W. Eokert, Mr. E.N. Knight, 
Mr. R. D. Valerga, Miss Louise Leigh ton, Mr. M, Cornell, Mr. F. La Fontaine, 
Miss Kate Marchi. 

Admission, 25 cents. Reserved Seats, 50 cents, Jan. 3. 

THE GRAND PACIFIC RINK, 

Cor. Sutter aud Jones Sts. 

pi? Largest, Finest and Beat on this Coast. Mitred Floor ! New Skates ! 
Good Management! Jan. 3. 




Tbe 



lost 

PUKE NATUKAL 

Mineral 

Water! 

INDORSED BY THE MEDICAL PROFESSION. 
FOR SALE EVERYWHERE. DEPOT, 513 SAl'BAMENTO ST. 



SCHOOL OF DESIGN. 

Tbe Annual Exhibition of the Works of the Pupils ol the 
CALIFORNIA SCHOOL OF DESIGN will open FREE TO THE PUBLIC on 
Monday Evening:. December 29th. 
The Prizes will be awarded on Wednesday Evening, at 8 o'clock. 
The next Term of the school will open on MONDAY, January 5, 18S5. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Jar,. 3, 1885. 



PLEASURE'S WAND. 

' We Obey no Wand but Pleasure's. "--Tom Moore. 

Of all sunny Italy's composers, not one can claim bo prominent a 
place amongst the great tune poets an Rossini. There are few musicians, 
either of Italy or of any other country, who have ever enjoyed such a 
decree of popularity as the Swan of Pesaro. At one time his music 
solely occupied nearly all the operatic stages of Europe, and none other 
would be listened to. Less learned and elaborately constructed, with 
fewer pretensions to all that is grand, majestic or severe, with nothing 
that i3 dry or difficult to understand, nothing suggestive of vast study, 
his music differs widely from that of the classical composers, and this was 
probably the secret of Rossini's popularity. His music appealed to the 
multitude, not alone to the educated class, and his great purpose seemed 
to be to please, and not to try his listeners with learned modulations, or 
maBterly illustrations of his learning. The very carelessness and hurry 
of composition that marked bia scores gave to them an air of freedom, of 
independence from classical conservatism that drew the popular approval. 
His opera of Semiramide, brought out at the Venice, in Venice, Febru- 
ary 3d, 1823, was not as much liked as its predecessors. It was written 
with more care and deliberation, and with less careless spontaniety. But 
with the lapse of time it has come to be considered one of the finest of 
his works. The subject is a sombre one. The score is full of rich num- 
bers the quartet (which must have been Verdi's inspiration when he 
composed the Miserere), the appearance of Ninus, the final trio, a scene 
s.i short and so dramatic, and the brilliant cavatina with chorus. In 
instrumentation it is brilliant and sonorous. Since the first production 
of Semiramide, sixty years ago, all the most distinguished soprani of the 
day have loved to appear in that work. Semiramide, th*e role, which has 
been so attractive to these singers, requires both dramatic and florid sing- 
ing. But the possession of vocal force and dignity is an absolute neces- 
sity in the singer attempting the part. 

***** 

Emma Abbott is totally devoid of those qualities, and her attempt — 
for such it is — to sing the role of Babylon's queen is an unfortunate one. 
With a light voice, a method that is lacking in imaginative effect, and a 
personality that is modern and practical, she destroys the illusion, with- 
out which such a character as Semiramide can not impress us, Her sing- 
ing is delicate and sweet in cantabile passages, and in the fioriture of 
" Bel Raggio" she vocalizes with considerable ease and fair accuracy, but 
her physical inability to musically characterize the part prevents her ef- 
fort from possessing artistic merit. For the lighter form of operatic mu- 
sic, and principally for ballad operas, she is sufficiently well qualified to 
gain popular approval, and the desire to substitute for that, the heavy 
dramatic school, can but detract from her reputation, and antagonize a 
public taste wedded to the more simple idea of opera. 

The great contralti have all found in Arsace a congenial role. It is in 
this that Scalchi recently established her great reputation. Miss Annan- 
dale has a voice of sufficient force and volume to sin« the music, but I do 
not find in her an intelligent and consistent application of her vocal gifts 
to the part. She sings it as she would the contralto role of a ballad opera, 
with its detached numbers. Arrayed in a costume, which in its 
tion of the modern burlesque is not compatible with such a char- 
acter as Arsace, she sings her numbers to the audience, and in the inter- 
vals lapses into complete indifference. 

***** 

The celebrated duet between Semiramide and Arsace is sung with me- 
lodic sweetness and a harmonic merging of the two voices. 

* * * * » 

The role of Idreno is an unimportant one, but it affords Fabrini an 
oppurtnnitj of developing the fact that his voice has gained both volume 
and sweetness since last, he sang to us. 

***** 

As in most of the performances of this troupe last season, the artistic 
success of_ this performance is Campobello. His operatic training 
has been in the Italian school, and there is a phase of idealism 
to bis manner, that is in strong contrast to the materialism of Abbott 
and the others. The music of Assur is difficult to sing. Rossini de- 
lighted in giving his male singers florid music. There are few baritones 
who possess enough flexibility of voice and ease of execution to sing the 
running passages of Assur. Campobello's voice has lost in firmness of 
tone and smoothness, since last year, and he sings this music hardly as 
well as he once undoubtedly has been able to do, but it is sufficiently 
well done to deserve praise. 

* * * * 

The chorus sing with the vim and dash that made it so agreeable a 
feature of the former performances. The orchestra played well under 
the evidently intelligent direction of Signor Tomasi. The smoothness 
and precision, which is a strong recommendation of this company, is as 
noticeable as ever. The version of the opera used is a sadly mangled 
one. As arranged in the libretto sold, it is badly cut; as played on>Ionday 
evening, it suffered still more, being shorn of several important scores. 
The scenery used is most ridiculous in its incongruity. Without being 
a stickler for chronological accuracy, a difference of several thousand 
years in matters of architecture may furnish one with excuse for fault 
finding. In one scene, Semiramide alludes to a "paper" in Arsace's 
hands. I may be wrong, but I do not think that the article was known 
for some little time subsequent to the date of the action. 

***** 

In Martha the troupe is heard to better advantage. Flotow's music is 
light and frivolous, and voices of average quality can sing with good effect 
the familiar airs. Abbott is a very taking Martha. She is full of life 
and spirit. She sings well throughout the opera, excepting in her man- 
ner of rendering the "Last Rose of Summer." The exaggeration of 
pathos and the intensity of sentiment with which she endows this ballad, 
makes of it a broad burlesque. Fabrini has improved greatly in a year. 
The quality of bis voice is purer and clearer. His " M'Appari " is a very 
sweet bit of singing. Miss Annandale is a buxom Nancy. Campobello's 
Plunkett has bit few equals. The spirit and dash with which he sings 
and acts the part make of it the strikiug feature of the performance. 



In a measure, Campobello bears the same relation to this troupe that 
Giannini did to the Cambiaggi, etc., organization. In Semiramide, Mar- 
tha and Mignon — the three operas performed in time for this week's re- 
view—he has been in each the artistic gem around which the others have 
clustered. His Lotario is admirably sung. The opening aria is delivered 
with faultless phrasing, and with a remarkable purity of tone. If voice 
is a divine gift it should have been inseparable from life. It fills us with 
pity to listen to what was once a noble voice — such as Castle's. If the 
man was an indifferent singer he would not be tolerated, but with a per- 
fect method he is respected for the past of his bright career. The music 
of Frederick is very well sung by &Iis3 Aanandale. The vivacity of her 
actiug would be more effective but for the lady's physical disqualifica- 
tions for male attire. 

***** 

As Mignon Emma Abbott touches the maximum of her operatic abil- 
ity. With the exception of the few bars of declamatory music at the 
commencement of tbe third act, in which she calls for the chateau's de- 
struction, she sings the part well. The defects of her voice and method 
are all laid bare, and yet she satisfies you. The thinness of her notes are 
noticed in the beautiful prayer of the last act, and yet she sings it well. 
The crudity of her execution is apparent in the aria before the glass, and 
still she pleases you. In this role she attains a point where her qualities 
and defects are in perfect balance. In the second act her sprigbtliness in 
male costume is obscured by the same misfortune of figure that is attach- 
ed to Miss Annandale. 

***** 

Laura Bellini has a voice which, in quality, iB Bimilar to Rosewald's. 
It is rich and round, but vailed in tone. Her method is amateurish, and 
her execution heavy and labored. She sings the Polacca with a certain 
dash, attained by a slurring of its florid features. The trills are imitated 
by a vigorous tremolo, and tbe runs are totally lacking in legato. In the 
quieter passages her voice develops its good qualities with most pleasing 
effect. In appearance Miss Bellini is prepossessing. 

The fourth concert of the Philharmonic Society is announced for next 
Wednesday afternoon. The four orchestral selections to be played are all 
new to the public of this city. The fifth number of the programme is 
Spohr's violin concerto, No. 9, which will be played by Henry Heyman. 
Besides his claims upon lovers of music as an artist, Mr. Heyman de 
serves well for his prominent part in the development of orchestral music 
in San Francisco. 

***** 

Ben Clark has never sung so sweetly as he is now doing with Emerson's 
company at the California. With Silvo, the juggler, Duncan, tbe ven- 
triloquist, the Martens and Wood, the entertainment of the troupe is 
a most enjoyable one. 

***** 

The different rigs in which Charley Reed attires himself, form a series 
of grotesque ideas that cannot be well matched. Franz Wetter is singing, 
in good voice and good form, some favorite selections. 

***** 

The Leavitt Company close their three weeks' season to-morrow even- 
ing, at the Bush-street Theatre. On Monday Ben Cotton, an old-timer 
among old-timers, appears at this theatre. He has abandoned, I believe, 
the burnt cork stage, and appears with a daughter of his in melodrama. 
There are several very successful novelties at hand at other places of 
amusement. 

***** 

No other theatre having seen fit to offera Christmas spectacle, the Tivoli 
is reaping the benefit of its monopoly in the matter. Prince North Pole 
is well mounted. Costumes and scenery are bright and attractive. Helen 
Dingeon sings a few things charmingly. 

Mr. A. Waldtenfel has just published the " Memories Waltzes," by 
J. V. Geary. 

BALDWIN THEATRE. 

Secure Seats Early. Last Time of these Operas. Overwhelming Success! 

EMMA ABBOTT GRAND ENGLISH OPEBA COMPANY! 

Abbott, Bellini, Anuamlale, Hiudle, Castle, Fabrini, Tagliapietra, 

Campobello, Broderiek, Allen, Ward, Tomasi. 

LAST WEEK OF THE FOLLOWING OPERAS: 
Monday— (Three Prime Donne), MIGNON. Tuesday— MARITANA. Wednesday 
Matmee — Popular Prices, 50c. and 75c., BOHEMIAN GIRL. Wednesday Night — 
BAHBER OF SEVILLE. Thursday— FAUST. Friday (Only Time) -KING FOR 
A D»Y. Saturday Matinee -EMMA ABBOTT in TRAVlATA. Saturday Night— 
IL TROVATORE. Jan. 3. 



CALIFORNIA THEATRE. 

WM. EMERSON Lessee and Manager 

18S5-HAPPY NEW YEAR!— 1SS5. The First Performance of the New Year of 

EMERSON'S WORLD'S FAIR COMPANY! 

GRAND MATINEE TO-DAY AT 2 P. M. : : PROGRAMME ALL NEW! 
Free Outdoor Exhibition at 1:30 p. m., and at 7:30 p. m. 

POPULAR PRICES: 
75, 50, 25c.; Matinee, 50 and 25c. Nothing extra. Jan. 3. 

BUSH-STREET THEATRE. 

Mr. M. B. LEAVITT. Lessee and Manager | Mr, JAY RIAL Acting Manager 

HAPPY NEW YEAR! Gala Matinee at 2 p. m. To-Day. 
LEAVITT'S NEW GIGANTIC SPECIALTY COMPANY I 

An Unprecedented Triumph! A Glo ious Programme for the Last Week! New 

Acts! New Songs! New Music! The'IWO BARNEYS in their Screaming Farce, 

MALONEY'S VISIT! 

Monday, January 5th —Reappearance, after an absence of 12 years, of the Favor- 
ite Comedian, MR. BEN COTTON, in his Latest Great Success, TRUE DEVOTION. 



Jan. 3, 1885. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



SPORTING. 



Ttao Esplnosa Club.— We have always advocated the establishment 

of elulw for prt'norvinj; game. The State has dune very little tfl BD 
the k'.une laws, aud practically nuthiotr fcowardi introdQcintf gftine hints. 
The California Web Oommissjoni with the Hmiced fanda at its disposal, 
baa shown a good deal of energy in the past, but there is iimre than 
eoougfa work for it ahead. The Espiuosa Club has been reoeotly formed, 
and includes fifty members, many of whom are known bti be thorough 
iportamen. They have secured a lease of Espinosa Lake, near Castro- 
nils, in Mouterey county. The lake is one and three quarters miles 
tout;, with an average breadth of half a mile, and is from 10 to ID feet 
deep. It is fed bj springs, and the water is always fresh and goodj the 
1 fall is about two feet. In 1877. 2,500 land locked Salmon were 

S laced in it, and 2,000 Sacramento Perch. In .luce, last year, 34,000 
EcLeod river Trout were put in, and it is proposed to hatch 100,000 more 
during March next. These fish will be hatched at the Del Monte hatch- 
ery, only a few miles distant. The Club has also secured a lease of Lake 
Merritt, which is within half a mile of E^pinosa, also some 2,000 acres 
of tule land, with numerous ponds. Lake Merritt is an excellent feeding 
ground, and furnishes good shooting for swan, ducks, geese and snipe. 
Mallard and teal, both greenwing, and cinnamon breed in the ponds, and 
each season brings flights of migratory canvasback, mallard, gadwell and 
widgeon in abundance. Five blinds have been built on Lake Merritt, 
three scows with blinds are anchored in Espinosa, and five blinda have 
beeu put up along the shore. The members have a ranch house, and 
there is a caretaker in charge, and a boat, and boat landing is always 
ready for use. Wild rice from Wisconsin has been imported and planted 
in the lakes, to feed the game. The arrangement of the blinds is so good 
that twenty persons can shoot from them, without being in the way of 
each other. The facilities for reaching the Club's preserves are complete, 
two trains leaving dailv by the Southern Pacific Railroad. We wish the 
Club every success; such organizations will prevent the country from be- 
ing depleted of game birds, and secure for the future genuine sport. 

Yachting.— Last Sunday the Chispa had a delightful trip from Sauce- 
lito, through Raccoon Straits, and to the Brothers and back. The party 
on board claim that the breeze was more even and satisfactory than found 
at any time during the regular yachting season. Captain Coalidge, who 
was at the Chispa 's helm, states that he found a stronger ebb tide than be 
has stemmed for years. The Whitewing went up the river last Sunday. 
.Mr. Lee intends spending his annual holiday amongst the tules, and in 
making pleasant acquaintances with various flights of canvasback. Mr. 
P. James Donahue, the joint owner of the Nellie, has just returned to 
this city, after au extended tour through Europe. During his stay in 
England, Mr. Donahue saw the large fleet of yachts that annually ren- 
dezvous at Cowes, and it is needless to add that he was delighted with 
the number and styles of the yachts. He also did some pleasant sailing 
in the North Sea. Mr. Donahue has been warmly welcomed home. Last 
Saturday the Nellie made a run up to Point San Quentin, and her owners 
did some duck-shooting over the Corte Madera marsh, and returned to 
this city on Sunday night. The sail down by moonlight was most en- 
joyable, and the breeze fresh enough to make every stitch of canvas draw. 
The Nellie will be kept in commission during the Winter months. 

Bicycling.— The annual meeting of the San Francisco Club will be 
held on the 8th iust., when the officers for the coming year will be 
elected. The Club has selected a new, handsome and appropriate uni- 
form. The annual dinner of the Club will take place immediately after 
the annual meeting. This gathering is always a jovial one, and 
we anticipate that it will prove exceptionally so this year. The Bay 
City Wheelmen are working like beavers to make a Buccessof the tourna- 
ment which takes place, on the 10th inst., in the Mechanics 1 Pavilion. 
In addition to the bicycle events, the programme will include a mile 
handicap walking-match. Writing of the programme suggests that the 
managers can make it useful as well as ornamental by printing the colors 
of the competitors. This plan will enable all the audience to tell at a 
glance "who's who." Numbers do not answer well, but distinct colors 
worn by each competitor will enable every one to know at once how the 
race is going. Doubtless every care will be taken to secure proper cos- 
tumes. At some athletic meetings the competitors display a lack of good 
taste in this regard. We infer that a leading feature of the Tournament 
will be the drill, in which the members are becoming daily more pro- 
ficient. 

Cricket.— The English Eleven, now in Australia, are nobly upholding 
the honor of the old country. In November, at Melbourne, they easily 
defeated eleven of Victoria. At the close of the same month, in Sydney, 
they won a match against eleven of New South Wales by four wickets. 
This match was largely attended, 16,000 persons paying for admission on 
one of the days. In the provinces, where the eleven have met odds of 
18 and 22, they have been uniformly successful. But the real test of the 
team's strength will come when they meet the Australian Eleven, with 
whom they play three matchee, one each in Sydney, Melbourne and 
Adelaide. 

Rifle-Shooting. — The breeze which blew across the range at Shell 
Mound last Sunday was not in favor of accurate shooting. The princi- 
pal event was a 100-shot match at 200 yards between Messrs. Cummings 
and Perkins v. Klein and Carson. The scores were: Cummings 441, Per- 
kins 428-869; Klein 437, Carson 426-863. Close work: 6 points in 400 
shots. This is the second time the winners have defeated the same com- 
petitors, and for the time being decides their claim to first honors. A 
triangular match at 200 yards, 50 shots each, was then tired between 
Chas Carr, who scored 220, E. Hovey 216, and Smith Carr 209. 

Duck-snooting. — The heavy rains just before Christmas scattered the 
birds in all directions. Near Suisun the ponds have overflowed, and 
ducks have wandered off to find fresh pastures. Up the river the same 
story is told. Now we must wait for fine weather to lure them back 
again. In the lower bay marshes the sport has also been poor. Hunters 
who want big bags, and who have plenty of time for the Bport, will do 
well to journey to Merced and Tulare counties. The flight is steadily 
moving south, and in the localities named the finest sport is now available. 



Bay Fishing. During the pi 
made at Lou- Wla-f, o.ii: at many yoni 

peared alnoe the late nine, and fortunate anglers ivh d them, 

oonsider themselves well paid for the trouble of waiting »n long for the 
Bport. Perch, tomcods and norgiea are numerous at the 
Wade, the man whosupp iei bait, rode, lines, etc, hai me 
to a Bpot opposite the landing of the Oakland boats. He always ! 
supply of the necessariej for fishing. 

During the past week three schooners belonging to Meters, J. I>. 
Spreckels ft limn , made the fastest time on record from tin- Hawaiian 
Islands to this port. The three reached here just one day apart. On 1 >>■- 
(■ember 27th the Consuelo, Cant, Cousins, name in from Honolulu in 1" 
days; on the 2Sth the H ia Olandina, Capt. uTadaen, reached hern in 9 

■ lays 'JO hours from Hilo ; on the 21»th the Kosarin, Capt. Swift, came into 
port in 10 days from Kahului. Such speed is pressing the steamers up 
pretty close. 

The Ring.— The fight between Manning and Cleary, on Tuesday 
night, appears to have been a genuine contest. Ten rounds were fought, 
and until the finish it was not easy to pick out the best man. Hut nei- 
ther of them were really in fighting trim. For once in a long while the 
public got the worth of its money, Cleary winning the fight in the tenth 
round, his opponent not being able to stand when time was called. 

Baseball.— A California League has been formed to play at the Cen- 
tra] Park Ground-. Four clubs are represented — the Stars, Haverlys 
San Franciscos and Occidentals. If the managers keep the men in order 
and see that the games are properly conducted, we may fairly anticipate 
a good season's play. None of the talent named is of a high order, but 
good enough to sustain the public interest if managed judiciously. 

Rowing. — The crews of the Golden Gate Club, who performed so many 
fouling feats recently, are not satisfied with the result of their barge race. 
It is to be rowed over again, this time not for a trophy, but for coin. The 
club certainly has a weakness for the chink of $20 pieces. The date of 
the second trial of speed and endurance has not yet reached us. 

Wrestling. — Whistler and Cannon are to wrestle catch-as-catch-can 
at the Central Park, on Monday night. Our readers know thoroughly 
well what we think of these matches. We need not add a word now to 
make our opinion more emphatic. 



We have to acknowledge the receipt of a beautiful calendar from 
the New England Life Insurance Company. Each year this company 
gets out something very artistic, and this year's surpasses all other efforts, 
both as regards design and execution. 



China. — The Pacific Mail steamship UUy of New York, hence Decem- 
ber 31st, carried 25,000 lbs. Ginseng, 4,000 bbls. Flour, 330,000 Cotton 
Sheetings, 100 flasks Quicksilver, etc. 

The great emporium for Japanese Goods is at MarBh & Co. 'a, No. 
625 Market street. They have complete facilities for obtaining the best. 



Finest Frozen Oysters, fat, fresh and juicy, 50 cents and 75 cents per 
tin, at C. Toohey's, 604 Market street, opposite New Montgomery. 

Isn't it about time for some of the eloping coachmen to be figuring in 
divorce suits ? 

PHILHARMONIC SOCIETY. 

FOURTH CONCERT I -AT PL ATT' S HALL, WEDNESDAY 
AFTERNOON, January 7th, 1885, at 3 o'clock. 

O. PIXRICUS -Conductor 

HENRY HI. YUAN, Soloist. 



Seats on Sale at SMEtMAN, CLAY & CO'S MUSIC HOUSE. 



Jan. 3. 



TIVOLI OPERA HOUSE. 

Eddy street, uear Market.— Kreling Bros., Sole Proprletois 
and Managers.— This Evening, and Every Evening until Further Notice, 

Prince North Pole! 

A Graud Operatic Spectacle, abounding with Magnificent Scenery, Sparkling Music, 
Handsome Costumes, Realistic Effects and a Beautiful Transformation Scene. Spe- 
cialties of a refined order will be introduced. 

Tne Cast will include: Misj Helene Dingeon, Mr. T. W. Eekert, Mr. E. X. Knight, 
Mr. R. D. Valerga, Miss Louise Leightou, Mr. M. Cornell, Mr. P. La Fontaine, 
Miss Kate Marchi. 

Admission, 25 cents. Reserved Seats, 50 cents. Jan. 3. 

THE GRAND PACIFIC RINK, 

Cor. «uttcr and Jones Sts. 

£3T Mrge 3 t, Finest and Best on this 
Good Management! 



Coast. Mitred Floor ! New Skates ! 
Jan. 3. 




T to. g> IB est t 



PUKE NATURAL 

Mineral 

Water! 

INDORSED BY THE MEDICAL PROFESSION. 
FOR SALE EVERYWHERE. DEPOT, 51S SACRAMENTO ST. 

SCHOOL OF DESIGN. 

The An ii ii nl Exhibition of the Works or the Pupils or the 
CALIFORNIA SCHOOL OF DESIGN will open FREE TO THE PUBLIC on 
Monday Evening, December 29th. 
The Prizes will he awarded on Wednesday Evening, at S o'clock. 
The next Term of the school will open on MONDAY, January 5, 18S5. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 3, 1885. 



WORLD, FLESH AND DEVIL. 



[ By a Truthful Penman ] 



As Eugenie, the ex-Empress of the French, iu 1867 knelt by the pal- 
let of a cholera-stricken man in the hospital at Amiens, and pressed his 
dying hand, he murmured, half unconsciously, " Thank you, my Sister," 
mistaking her for one of the nurses. "It is not a Sister," whispered the 
nun in his ear ; "it is our Empress come to visit us." " Do not correct 
him," said Eugenie promptly, " he cannot give me a nobler name." That 
same day she moved towards a closed door. The head surgeon in at- 
tendance begged her not to cross it, as it led to the small-pox ward and to 
some dangerous caBes. " Let me see them," she said, " they suffer too," 
and entered. She had as little care for her beauty as for her life, and the 
crowd outside recognized the abnegation of the woman as well as the 
bravery of the sovereign, and she was well-nigh carried in triumph to 
her carriage ; and her attendants, when they disrobed her, found that 
the hem of her garments had been cut and carried off as relics. With 
the faults and failings of her nature and education— faults that hasteued 
perhaps the fall of her short-lived popularity— she had the reckless in- 
trepidity of her Celtic origin and the indomitable will of her Spanish 
forefathers. The beauty of Madrid, the Sovereign of the Tuileries, the 
widow of Faro borough was never laekiog in spirit and courage. 

Sir John Lubbock continues bis experiments with his dog, and he 
hopes in time to make the creature as accomplished as the average biped. 
It is about eighteen months since he began the education of his poodle, 
"Van." His idea was that the dog, if he wanted anything, should ask 
for it, and, as his bark might not be intelligible, a series of cards were 
arranged by means of which he could make known his desires. Thus, a 
card labeled " Food " is laid within his reach, and when he is hungry he 
takes it up in his mouth and brings it to his master. In the same way, if 
he wants to go out, he picks up a card with the word "Out" upon it, and 
brings that up. A favorite card with him is labeled "Bone," for its 
presentation is followed by the bestowal of a toothsome morsel. Having 
succeeded in teaching the animal so far, Sir John has lately been trying 
some experiments in order, if possible, to teach it to distinguish color. 
But this has hitherto, he says, proved a failure. — Court Journal. 

According to a New York paper, a young woman was suing her 
ex-sweetheart for a breach of promise, and the lawyers were, as usual, 
making all sorts of inquisitive interrogatories. "You say," remarked 
one, " that the defendant frequently sat very close to you?" "Yes, sir," 
was the reply, with a hectic flush. " How close ? " " Close enough, so's 
one cheer was all the sittin' room we needed." " And you say he put his 
arm around you?" "No, I didn't." " What did you say, then?" "I 
said he put both arms around me." "Then what?" "He hugged me." 
" Very hard?" " Yes, he did. So hard that I came purty near hollerin' 

right out." "Why didn't you holler?" "'Cause " "That's no 

reason. Be explicit, please. Because what?" " 'Cause I was afeard he'd 
stop." The Court fell off the bench, and had to be carried and put under 
the hydrant for the purpose of resuscitation. 

Ladles have not very often distinguished themselves in the field of in- 
vention, so when one of them comes forward in that line it is a pleasure 
to record her work. An Englishwoman has invented an ingenious instru- 
ment for dividing a straight line accurately into a defined number of equal 
parts. Another, Mme. Dulong Tuyssusian, has, after a course of exper- 
iments, extending over eighteen years, constructed a machine which cuts 
plates of metal of considerable thickness, according to any elaborate de- 
sign or pattern. Her invention is well known to French architects, but 
it has only very lately been introduced into England. 

The Porte has sent a formal protest, to be delivered by its Ambassador 
in Paris, against the French occupation of Tadjnrah, in the Gulf of Aden, 
opposite Perim. The Porte declares that the Arab sheiks have no right 
to sell or cede the territory in question, and that the cession is altogether 
different from that of Assab to the Italians, and of other places occupied 
by England. The Ambassador is asked to request France to withdraw 
her troops. 

Much sensation has been created by an outrage committed on the 
railway between Leignitz and Golberg, in Silesia, by a young lady, the 
daughter of a landed proprietor, who threw a flask of vitriol in the face 
of a gentleman in the same carriage, who had deserted her in favor of 
another lady. After throwing the vitriol she dr^ew a revolver and fired 
on the man, slightly wounding him, before she could be arrested. 

This has been a very bad year for cabbage -growers in New England. 
In one field in Western Massachusetts, ten thousand heads were not 
harvested, because nobody would offer a cent a piece for them. Great 
quantities have been stored, awaiting a demand. How to hold cabbages 
safely, is a question which Eastern farmers would greatly like to hear 
answered. 

There Is a woman living at the village of Auberives-en-Pvoyans, 
Department of Isere, France, who is supposed to be 125 years old. The 
priest of the local church testifies from the records of the vestry that she 
was married in 1783, or 101 years ago. Her name is Marie Durand veuve 
Girard. She does not remember at what age she was married. 

At Mote, near Maidstone, Eng., the ceremony of opening a silo was re- 
cently performed in the presence of a large number of agriculturists. The 
grass, to the extent of eighty tons, was placed in the silo in June last, and 
was found to be in splendid condition. It was eaten by the cattle with 
great avidity, and the smell was all that could be desired. 

An important find of old documents has been made in Home. A pile 
of what appeared to be waste paper turns out to be a collection of very 
valuable documents, including the secret correspondence of the Constable 
de Bourbon. 

In France if a man divorces his wife they cannot marry each other 
again if either has, since the first marriage, contracted a fresh marriage, 
followed by a second divorce ; otherwise they can re-marry. A respondent 
is never allowed to marry a corespondent, nor an accomplice in adultery. 
Adultery alone, by either party, is sufficient ground for a divorce. 



INSURANCE. 



HUTCHINSON & MANN 
JF"ire and Marine Insurance Agency, 

Nos. 322 and 324 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Capital Represented ...$27,000,000. 

All Losses Equitably Adjusted and Promptly Paid. 

PACIFIC DEPARTMENT 
THE FIRE INSURANCE ASSOCIATION OF LONDON. 

HUTCHINSON 4 MANN Managers | W. h. CHALMERS.. Special and Adjuster 

HOME MUTUAL INSURANCE COMPANY, OF CALIFORNIA. 

Organized 1S64. 
Principal Office 216 Sansome street. 

FIRE INSUBAKCE. 

Capital Paid TJp in TT. S. Gold Coin) $300,000 00 

Reinsurance Reserve $200,059 75 

Assets January 1, 1834 $759,475. i3 I Premiums, since organizat'n. $4, 511,827. 57 

Surplus for policyholders S752.096.73 Losses, since organization.. §1,972,098 40 

Net Surplus (over everything) 5^53,030.98 | 

OFFICERS: 

J. F. HOUGHTON President I CHAS. R. STORY Secretary 

J. L. N. SHEPARD Vice-President | R. H. MAGILL General Agent 

Directors of tub Home Muti-al Ixsorancb Co.— L. L. baker, H. L. Dodge, J. 
L. N. Shepard, John Currey, J. F. Houghton, John Sinclair, C. Waterhouse, Chauncey 
Taylor, 8. Huff, J. S. Carter, H. P. Coo n. April 12. 

SOUTH BRITISH AND NATIONAL FIRE AND MARINE INS. CO. 

Capital, 320,000,000- 
Unlimited Liability of Shareholders. 

THE CITY OF LONDON FIRE INSURANCE CO. 

' Capital, $10,000,000- 

THE STANDARD MARINE INSURANCE CO., LIMITED, 

Of Liverpool- Capital, $5,000,000- 

W J. CALLISGUAJI A CO., General Agents, 

213-215 Sansome Street 
B. II. Sll.vrilV. Manager City Department. 

UNION INSURANCE COMPANY OF SAN FRANCISCO. 

PBINCIPAL OFFICE 416 CALIFORNIA STREET. 

(CALIFORNIA LLOYDS.) 

Capital 8730.000 | Assets Over 81,000,000 

The Leading Fire and Marine Insurance Co. of California. 

JAS. D. BAILEY Secretary I GUSTAVB TOUCHARD President 

C. P. FARNFIELD General Agent | N. G. KITTLE Vice-President 

GEO. T. BOHEN, Surveyor. 

A JOINT POLICY ISSUED BY THE FOUR COMPANIES. 

Imperial Fire Insurance Co , of London Instituted 1803. 

London Assurance Corporation, of London 

Established by Royal Charter 1720. 

Northern Assurance Corporation, of London.. ..Established 1836. 
Queen Insurance Company, of Liverpool Established 1857. 

ROBERT &ICKSON, Manager. 
S.E. Cor. California and Montgomery Sts. . Safe Deposit Building. 



PHCENIX ASSURANCE COMPANY 

Of London, England, Estab'd 1782.-Cash Assets, $5,266,372.35 

BRITISH AMERICA ASSURANCE COMPANY 

Of Toronto, Canada. Estab'd 1833. —Cash Assets, $1,343,908.04 

WESTERN ASSURANCE COMPANY 

Of Toronto, Canada, Estab'd 1851.— Cash Assets, $1,357,326.39 

BUTLER A H ALDAN, 

General Agents for Pacific Coast, 

413 California Street San Francisco. 

THE SWISS MARINE INS. COMPANIES COMBINED. 

Switzerland, of Zurlcli. Capital 5,000,000 francs; Helvetia, 
of St. Gall, Capital 10,000,000 francs ; Baloise, of Basle, Capital 5,000,000 francs. 
These three Companies are liable jointly and severally for all losses that may be sus- 
ained. Losses made payable in all the principal seaports of the world. In the set- 
tlement of all claims under an English policy, these Companies will strictly adhere to 
the conditions and customs adopted at Lloyds, and submit to Enjjlish jurisdiction. 
June 9. HARRY W. SYZ, Agent, 420 and 422 California st., S. F. 

THAMES AND MERSEY MARINE INSURANCE COMPANY 

(Limited), of Liverpool, London and Manchester. 

CAPITAL SUBSCRIBED $10,000,000 

Capital paid up 1,000,000 

Reserve JFund (in addition to capital) 1 ,875 ,000 

Total Assets June 30, 1883 6,232,712 

W.1I. GREEK HARRISON, Manager, 

[July 19.] 308 Pine street, San Francisco. 

NATIONAL ASSURANCE COMPANY OF IRELAND. 

[ESTABLISHED A. D. 1822.] 
Authorized Capital.$10,000,000 I Subscribed Capital.. .$5,000,000 

H. M. NEWHA1L & CO., 

General Agents for the Pacific Coast. 

Office— 309 Sausoiue street, Sail Francisco. 



Jan. 3, 1885. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



PASSING REMARKS. 



Among the many pretty faces peeking out <>f Kossamar homis that 
Bttfead along the streeU during the rainstorm of last week, was one that 
Matted the admiration of all who caught Bight of it. The curly hair 
creep*?*, out of the hood here and there with most picturesque neglige": 
thf oomplaxion was pure and good, Boreas gave color to the cheeks, and 
Plavitu covered them with dew; the eyes were honest and smiling, and 
all in all it was the freshest, prettiest face that man could wish to see. 
The sun was shining yesterday, and all the women were out for dress- 
parade in all their finery. I saw the same face in the throng, but how 
different! The hair, in stiff fish-hooks, festooned about a marbleized 
brow; the lashes artistically (!) blackened; the cheeks rouged, and at the 
base <f the nose and the corners of the mouth the liquid white stuff 
which covered the face had formed little bluish settlements. What a 

change! 

• * • • * 

I once asked an intelligent lady friend, who believes in leaving Na- 
ture's handiwork alone, why it was that women could not be made to Bee 
the folly of "making up?" She told me she didn't know. She never 
understood it herself, especially since she had once undergone the process 
herself. I will relate what she told me, using her own words : " I was 
foolish enough once to get myself made up. I was going to a swell en- 
tertainment, and my cousin, who never would be seen in public without 
much preparation, persuaded me to allow myself to be " beautified ! " 
More out of curiosity than anything else, I consented. S , the hair- 
dresser, was engaged for the task. I sat down before the glass. He first 
proceeded to fix up my hair. I will not attempt to describe the structure 
he erected upon my head— besides, you know, hair-dressing is not the 
same thing as making up. To commence with, my face was daubed with 
some preparation of vile-smelling benzoin— I don't mean benzine. Then 
it was sponged with Cream of Lilies and Milk of Ivory, each coat being 
allowed to dry. Then I was dabbed with Bloom of Blush Roses. Then 
my eyelashes were stuck straight out with a stiffening of black stuff. 
S then made brief visits into my ears and nostrils with a pinkish solu- 
tion that tickled. With a stick of red, he laid out the carmine scollops 
on my upper lip, and laid a coat on my lower, and with a pencil of blue 
he traced hieroglyphics on my temples. He then puffed me with 
Veloutine, and then swept me off with an infant's brush to soften the 
general effect. The job was done. To be appreciated I should have been 
seen. I was, in my opinion, the toughest-looking customer that ever 
fronted a looking-glass. I felt like a new-laid egg in a shell. I tried to 
smile, but found life was for me at last a serious thing. When I winked 
my lashes clashed like scrubbing-brushes. Partial" paralysis had me by 
the nose, and catalepsy by both ears. To repeat, to be appreciated I 
ought to have been seen. But I wasn't. I refused to go out of the 
house. I rushed for soap and water, and a fine time I had getting back 
to original sin. Some of the cosmetics would not wash off, but slipped 
around in greasy blue patches, and no amount of rubbing would eradi- 
cate the black from around the eyes. I stayed home and missed the 
party. My cousin laughed at me and went. She was accustomed to the 
sensation. It was weeks, with daily scrubbings, before I felt like myself 
again. I really don't understand how any woman can stand it." 

* * # » * 

An ugly face may be made pretty, or an old face young,_ by the appli- 
cation of washes and dyes and paints — perhaps. But it is a dead cer- 
tainty that the use of such stuffs destroys the good looks that Nature has 
given and Time spared. 

" What is grand opera? " asked a young man of his cynical parent. 

" I don't know." 

" Why are some operas called grand, while others are not so desig- 
nated? It seems to me that if a composer could write grand operas, he 
would never write any other kind." 

" Well, you see, it's only by experiment that a composer can deter- 
mine whether an opera is grand. If, upon first production, the music is 
beyond the ability of the singers and bores the audience, it is grand. 
The weary yawn of a man doe3 more, my Bon, to determine the value of 
an opera than the highest recommendation from a professional musical 
critic. If the singer can climb to the summit of emergency, and if the 
audience is pleased, the opera is not grand, and the composer goes away 
dissatisfied, disappointed and disconsolate. Sometimes the composer can 
correct the mistake brought to light on the proof-sheet of first production. 
On one occasion a great composer produced an opera which he hoped 
would be grand ; but there was so much music in it, the singers did so 
well, and the audience went into such fits of rapture and spasms of en- 
joyment that the composer saw his work doomed to a wayward life of 
inferior appreciation. After the performance, he took the score and sat 
up all night crossing out the music and marking in rasp flats and guinea- 
hen sharps. He awaited the second performance with impatience. The 
audience was reBtless. Men began to talk business and politics. Women 
munched candy and gossiped. Old people fell asleep. Young couples 
spooned. The voices on the stage broke and fell in shattered fragments. 
The composer went away happy. His opera was grasd.'^ 

" Did the people continue their patronage after the music was marked 
out and the opera pronounced grand?" 

"Bless your ignorance, yes! Why. the increase in attendance was 
wonderful. At first only the people who really love the ' concord of 
sweet sounds * went to Bee it, but afterward — when it was declared grand — 
it was enjoyed by all. The man with the dullest ear appreciated it quite 
as much, or pretended to, anyway, which is all the same, as the person 
whose spirit is stirred by the gentle touch of soul-born harmony. (That'B 
a fine sentence, that last one, my son)." 

" But, father, if you think there is really nothing sweet in the grand 
operas, why do you take mother to see them ? " 

" Because I am a fool, son." 

"Yes, but why does mother — " 

" Because she is a fool, my boy." 

"Are all people thus actuated?" 

"Yes; that is, all who are honest enough to confess it." 

"Dont you believe there are people who enjoy grand operas?" 

"Oh, yes." 



"They are highly cultivated, are they not?" 

" No, not iifct'jwirily." 

"What kind of people are they?" 

" Deaf people, young man." 

* * • • • 

I submit the above conversation as an example of the versatility of my 
facile pen. It is in entire inconsistency with my own opinions. Scin- 
tillations of that kind will he furnished, on application, at five cents a 
word ; on Sundays and holidays, at ten cents. Clairreai/. 



The mechanical appearance of the News LBTTEBB Christmas num- 
ber attracted universal attention, and called forth unstinted praise. For 
this great result we are largely indebted to the splendid inks supplied us 
by Messrs. E. J. Shattuck & Co. Had it not been for the perfect quality 
of the inks used, the clear appearance of the letter press and pictures 
would have been impossible of attainment, and we could not have pro- 
duced an engraving of Marmion, which all competent critics admit is a 
first-class work of art. Messrs. Shattuck & Co. deal in and manufacture 
all grades of printing and lithographic inks, composition rollers, trans- 
parent varnish, German bronze powders, stones and other lithographic 
materials, and printers' small supplies of every description. After trading 
with it for a long time, we are in a position to pronounce the firm the 
most reliable on the Pacific Coast. Its goods will always be found equal 
to representation. 

Persons who are in search of Boots and Shoes will do well to bear in 
mind that Messrs. Nolan Bros., of Nos. 812 and 814 Market street (in 
the Phelan Building) have on hand a magnificent assortment of imported 
and domestic goods, including a full line of the famous Pinet's Parisian 
Ladies' Walking Boots. A perfect fit, the greatest ease and almost un- 
limited durability are guaranteed. 

Those rich, luscious Mobile Oysters, sold by Moraghan, at stalls 
No. 68 and 69 California Market, are a table delicacy which would tempt 
a prince. Try them and be convinced. 

Barometers for hotels, insurance offices, banks, halls, etc., at Midler's 
Optical Depot, 135 Montgomery street. 

B ANKS AND INSURANCE. 

(Organized 1863.) 

FIREMAN'S FUND INSURANCE COMPANY. 

Fire and Marine Insurance. 
Assets 81,500,000 | Losses paid over. .85,000,000 

6^- The Largest Assets and Largest Income of all the Companies hailing from 
west of New York State, and writes more Premiums on the Pacific Coast than any 
other Company Local, Eastern or Foreign. 

L> J. STAPLES ...President I WM. J. DUTTON Secretary 

ALPHEUS BOLL Vice-President | E. W. CARPENTER Asst. Secretory 

SOME OFFICE, 
SOUTHWEST COB. CALIFORNIA AND SANSOME STS., 

SAN FRANCISCO. 
Agents in all prominent localities. Sept. 13. 

PACIFIC DEPARTMENT 

LONDON AND LANCASHIRE FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY 

OF LIVERPOOL. 

Capital $9,260,000 

Cash Assets 2,764,875 

Cash Assets in United States 1,398,646 

BALFOUR, GUTHRIE A CO., General Agents, 
March 20. 316 California Street, San Francisco. 

BRITISH AND FOREIGN MARINE INS. CO. OF LIVERPOOL. 

/Capital 85,000,000..— Agents: Balfonr, Gnlhrle * Co., No. 

\/ 316 California street, San Francisco. Nov. 18. 

Charles Crocker, E. 0. Wool-worth, Wm. H, Crocker 

CROCKER, WOOLWORTH & CO., 

BANKERS, 

382 PINE STREET SAN FRANCISCO. 

scarry on a General Banking Business. Correspondents 

\y in the principal cities of the Eastern States and in Europe. June 16. 

SECURITY SAVINGS BANK. 

GUARANTEE CAPITAL 8300,000. 

Officers: Vice-President, Jerome Lincoln; Secretary, TV. 
S. Jones ; Attorney, Sidney V. Smith. Loans made on Real Estate and other 
Approved Securities. Office : No. 215 Sansome street, San Francisco. Oct. 1. 

THE GERMAN SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 

Deutsche Spar null Lelli bank, Nu.5'-!6 California street, San 
Francisco. Officers : President, L. GOTTIG. Board of Directors.— L. 
Gottig, Fred Roeding, Chas. Kohler, Edw. Kruse, George H. Eggers, N. Van Bergen, 
H L Simon Peter Spreckels, A. E. Hecht. Secretary, GEO. LETTE; Attorneys, 
JARBOE & HARRISON. May 18 - 

SELBY SMELTING AND LEAD COMPANY, 

416 Montgomery Street San Francisco 

Gold and Silver Refinery and Assay Office. 

HigheBfc Prices Paid for Gold, Silver and Lead Ores and Sulphurets. Manufac- 
turers of BLUESTONE. Also, Lead Pipe, Sheet Lead, Shot, etc. This Company 
has the best facilities on the Coast for working GOLD, SILVER and LEAD in their 

'"junelfi.™ 18, PBENTISS SELBY, Superintendent. 



10 



SA^ FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 3, 1885. 



THE MEMORIES OF '84. 

I heard the clucks toll forth the knell 

Of poor old eighty four, 
It sounded like a sad farewell — 

It made iny heart feel sore. 

For memories of dear friends gone 
Came crowding o'er my brain. 

Faces no more I'll gaze upon, 
Hands I'll ne'er clasp again. 

Each little act of kindness done 
By those who've passed away, 

Illumined by fond memories sun, 
Shone forth as bright as day. 

While every angry word of mine, 

Stood forth in somber hue, 
Like slimy things that twist and twine 

From out some inky slough. 

And while I mused I aeemed to Bee 
One face we all knew well, 

A kindly face as well could be — 
The name I need not tell. 

The grass, as yet, has hardly grown 

Over his new-made grave, 
Nor flowers loving hands have sown 

'Neath where the oak trees wave. 

I saw him as he used to look, 

With that quaint, pleasant smile, 

When he seemed to read me like a book, 
Still be joking all the while. 

And I thought, as I heard the joy-bells ring 
For the birth of eighty-five: 
"A year's death is not Bucb a joyous thing 
For those who are left alive." 
San Franci3CO, January 1st, 1885. 



CONCERNING MORMONISM. 
Apostle Cannon, of the Mormon Church, is creating a sensation in 
Switzerland. A cablegram details at some length his missionary work at 
Berne and, as usual, the unmarried maiden of venerable years is brought 
forward as occupying a front seat among the congregation. The evident 
intention is to burlesque the spiritual ministrations of the Apostle, and 
make it appear that he is but figuring in a farce. The public is regaled 
with this stuff, and costly stuff it is, if we sum up the amount per word 
for sending it by cablegram and telegram all over the United States. 
It has no' dawned upon some minds that the day for burlesquing Mor- 
monism has gone by, and that the venerable spinster is a rare and insig- 
nificant figure among the S tints. The stern reality, the vigor aud aggres- 
siveness of Mormonism is, as we understand it, most strikingly exhibited 
in the person of Apostle Cannon under the circumstances which he ap- 
pears in Switzerland. Here is a man unable to speak the language of 
the country, i «i the presence of a government hostile to him and his opin- 
ions, and injured besides in the public mind with the conviction that the 
government of which be is a citizen is hostile to him and his sect. Yet 
this man openly and boldly preaches the Mormon "gospel of salvation," 
through an interpreter, to a people reared and educated in the Calvanistic 
and Catholic creeds, the two cast iron creeds of Christianity. There is, 
there must be some intense motive power behind this man which dares 
him to brave persecution, ridicule and organized force, ever ready to as- 
sail or imprison him. What that motive is may well demand an inquiry. 
We think it is the intense conviction of the man that he is engaged in the 
work of the Master, and in so far as ttu injunction to preach "without 
purse or scrip " is concerned, no missionaries have ever so literally ful- 
filled it as the Mormon. This is one secret of their Buccess. Another in- 
junction of the Master is literally followed by the Elders of Mormon- 
ism— they preach not to the well, but to the sick; they preach to 
the poor and lowly, and offer them such inducements as no other 
missionaries can offer; they offer them houses and homes and lands 
and not only this, but they furnish the means, in cases of poverty, to se- 
cure the ends desired. In this connection the Mormon Church has the 
most splendid organization of any church in America, and its Emigration 
Fund is one of its greatest sources of strength. Who will deny that fol- 
lowing in the footsteps of the Master, as in the instances cited the Mor- 
mon missionaries do, they will not reap the harvest? Who will deny 
that such allurements offered to the poor and lowly have not a captiva- 
ting influence over them. Our readers will remember, time and again, of 
having read of so many hundred Mormon immigrants arriving by this or 
that steamer, and now we lay before them the simple modus operandi in 
which they were gathered into the fold of the Saints. It is a mistake to 
think that the alluring bait of polygamy is held out to the converts in 
foreign lands ; this is veiled and hidden until they reach the valleys of 
Zion, where it is glorified as celestial marriage, though condemned in the 
American mind as a bestiality. But we are not now discussing the feature 
of polygamy ; we are Beeking to inquire into the motives which induce 
Apostle Cannon to leave house, home and family and go into the world 
to preach his doctrines — doctrines which are held to be repulsive by the 
vast majority of Europeans and Americans. We think we have discov- 
ered the motive, and as long as it continues to inspire Cannon and men 
like him, so long will Mormonism continue to increase in strength and 
power. In writing upon this fanatical outburst called Mormonism, it is 
the fashion to hurl at it vigorous epithets, and every editor and preacher 
in the country has belabored it with fierce and fiery adjectives until 
Webster's Unabridged has been exhausted. A few calm words may not 
be out of place, and the more calmly and deeply do we look at the Mor- 
mon problem, as it is called, the more are we convinced that the politicians 
are not capable of solving it. The twin relic has got a foothold, and, un- 
like slavery, it cannot he hlutted out by fire and sword. How are we to 
heal this national wound? 



CLEVELAND'S LETTER. 

The letter which President-elect Cleveland has addressed to G-. W. 
Curtis, in regard to the position and action of the incoming Federal Ad- 
ministration toward Civil Service Reform, is a clear, direct and unequiv- 
ocal enunciation of principle, and should be hailed with delight by 
every friend of reform aud good government. It is not the utterance of 
a demagogue seeking to placate or deceive a strong public sentiment with 
specious platitudes. It is not the utterance of an amateur statesman or 
an ignorant politician. On the contrary, every line of it shows that the 
man who has been called to the position of Chief Magistrate of this great 
country is thoroughly informed in regard to public affairs, and is thor- 
oughly abreast of the reform spirit of the day. 

The first and most important question in the American politics of to- 
day is such a thorough reformation of the public service as will result in 
the abolition of the spoils system, and the consequential raising of the 
tone of the public life, so that men in whom the highest intellectual 
power is combined with the strictest personal integrity, will find it a con- 
genial field of exertion. There are other great questions awaiting discus- 
sion and adjustment, but Civil Service Reform is the first, because until 
it is fully attained, and its effect thoroughly felt, any attempt to deal, in 
a satisfactory way, with intricatejeconomic questions, will result in fail- 
ure. Pot-house politicians, ward-club manipulators and spoils dividers 
cannot be expected to possess any very thorough knowledge of the science 
of political economy. 

Mr. Hendricks, the Vice-President-elect, recently, in speaking of Civil 
Service Reform, intimated that he was not in favor of " reform after the 
schoolmaster's fashion," but that he was in favor of "turning the ras- 
cals out." In other words, that while, by garbling phrases, he pre- 
tended to be in favor of reform, be was really in favor of the old system. 
As these remarks were made just subsequent to a visit to Cleveland, 
many of those who, believing in the latter's earnestness in the cause of 
reform, gave him a heartv support, were naturally inclined to think that 
they had been duped. This timely letter sets all those doubts at rest. 
The President-elect has announced in words that convey no double mean- 
ing, that he will not only thoroughly enforce the imperfect Civil Service 
law now in operation, but that he will, also, use the entire Executive 
power in promoting the cause of reform in its broadest spirit. It is 
clear, therefore, that, in the person of Mr. Cleveland, the Democrats 
have elected a capable and progressive man suited to the times, and, if 
the Democratic leaders rally around their Chief with that enthusiasm 
which they should, the new Democratic party will undoubtedly be en- 
trusted with the guidance of public affairs for many years to come. If, 
on the other hand, these leaders rally around the ideas represented by 
Hendrick's, their party will, on the first occasion possible, be relegated 
to that region of defeat from which it has just been drawn by a curious 
combination of public sentiment. 

It is perhaps proper to remark, in conclusion, that Cleveland's letter 
must have been very cold comfort to the crowd of Democratic political 
bummers who are now quarreling over the prospective division of the 
" Federal patronage" in this State — a State in which their contemptible 
incapacity turned a favorable public sentiment of overwhelming dimen- 
sions, in two short years, into profound public distrust of equally over- 
whelming dimensions. 

PLYMOUTH CHURCH RELIGION. 
In a world that is full of curiosities, there is nothing more curious 
than religion, and the religion of Plymouth Church, Brooklyn. New 
York, is probably about one of the most remarkable brands of the artiole 
to be found in the wide world. The congregation of this esthetical 
Temple of sacred culture stuck to their pastor with a unanimity which 
was delightful to behold, for a very long period of time, and a period 
which covered several episodes, in which Mr. Beecher's reputation as a 
man of good morals, if not as a Christian teacher, was seriously chal- 
lenged. Throughout this long period he was, also, continuously making 
an exhibition of himself in the political as well as the theological arena; 
but no matter how bigoted or unscrupulous a partisan he showed him- 
self to be, and no matter how much he antagonized established theologi- 
cal dogmas and drifted toward atheism, the lambs of his flock never lost 
faith in their shepherd — never up to that eventful day last Summer when 
he declared against Bob Ingersol's Plumed Knight. What the real 
cause of Beecher's opposition to Blaine was, has never yet appeared. Of 
course it is all nonsense to suppose that it was on the ground of Blaine's 
bad record and personal unfitness. Beecher is too well known for any 
one to accuse him of being animated by sentimental motives of that kind. 
Still, whatever were the reasons which governed his actions, he never in 
the political field championed a worthier cause than when he stepped out 
in advocacy of reform and purer politics, and he never conducted him- 
self in a campaign in a more dignified manner. Yet this is the very 
time when the pious folks of Plymouth Church have gone back on him. 
And it is curious, also, to note that one of the principal objections raised 
against his course, is the fact that he boldly stated, at a public meeting, 
that if every man who had been guilty of a crime similar to the single 
one charged against Cleveland voted for the latter, he would be elected 
by an overwhelming majority. Yet this was the simple truth — and Ply- 
mouth Church has often tolerated Beecher's telling vulgar falsehoods. 
What manner of religion is this Plymouth Church article anyhow ? 
Surely it is worth analysis 1 



Captain James Coulter, of the Star of Erin, died on the passage from 
Acapulco to this port, of malarial fever. The deceased gentleman was a 
thorough type of the British sailor ; brave as a lion under the most trying 
circumstances, true as steel to his friends, and generous to a fault. He 
died at his post, worn out in attendance on the suffering sailors who were 
stricken down with the same terrible malady. They were his first care, 
self was forgotten, and in his successful endeavor to preserve their lives 
Coulter sacrificed his own and found a sailor's grave. A general favorite 
in the service, to which he was attached for over twenty years, beloved 
by bis men, and respected by his employers, his death is a severe and 
sudden shock ; and not to them alone, but to his man-, friends in this city 
and Portland, to whom he was linked with the adamautrue bond peculiar 
to a man of his disposition and character. To his bn»ther, William A. 
Coulter, the well-known artist, and to his family, the News Letteb ex- 
tends its most sincere sympathy in this dark hour of their affliction. 



Jm S, 188.\ 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



11 



TOWN CRIER. 



'llc«r the (Marl" " Wl irl thou! 

'One th»l will p'm tin- ,lt\J], hir, with (TOO." 
' He'd a oU&g in blfl Ull as long as u lltiil, 

Whlefa i bolder and bolder." 



Several nights ago some members elect of the California LegiBla- 
1 1 !*•■ rot exchanging yarns in an uptown barroom, and one of the 
Pindar* acquitted himself as follows: "That's an old story of yours, 
Jimmy, about the fellow who named hi* rooster Robinson, because he 
. but it reminds me of one I think you never heard. Before I ar- 
rival at tin- m when legislative and other honors burden a man, I was 
an innocent kid, aud bad no other trouble in the world save a disposition 
on the part of my shirt to come surging out like a white belt in front, 
and --ft n hanging behind like a flag of truce in a calm. This freak was 
the bono of my poor mother'.-* life. How well I recollect coming home 
v in my normal state of dirt and Hying colors (white), when she 
exclaimed to my father, in a tone from the depths of despair: 'John, I 
pinned that boy's shirt-tail to the inside of the surplus of his breeches, 
and DOW look at it !' ' Von ought to call it "murder," my dear,' mildly 
•1 the old man. ' Why, my love?' ' Because it " will out," my 
jewel. 1 " 

Peck's Snn has consulted the dictionary in reference to the word 
" t male," and says that "for once Webster failed to help us out of a 
difficulty. An appeal is hereby made to some nf the Argonauts of that 
(the Pacific's) glorious climate to shed light on it." Tomales are an edible 
compound, composed of corn-meal, chicken, Chili colorow and other 
reasoning, the whole deftly wrapped in corn-husks. Tbey are 
manufactured and sold principally by the Spanish population. A full- 
grown tomnle sells for ten cents. Since the manufacturers have begun 
in qm Ben-gull in place of chicken, however, the demand has greatly 
fallen off. If the editor of the Sun desires a cargo, the T. C. will attend 
to the shipment for a reasonable commission. 

The Mosaic account of the creation has had a new light thrown upon 
it by the researches of a youthful member of one of our Sabbath-schools, 
who, a Sunday or two back, delivered himself as follows on this important 
subject: " God made man in his own image out of the dust of the earth, 
and then he took the jawbone out of him and made a woman of it." If 
ntli had only been born in time to be of use in the revision of the 
Scriptures, just completed, much light might have been thrown on ob- 
scure passages, and many doctrinal points cleared up. As it is, the con- 
Diet betwixt science and theology is likely to go on. 

A hungry wolf, who had been pondering upon the question of where 
he was to get his breakfast, met a Spring Iamb. No sooner had he caught 
Bight of the sheep than he pounced upon him and began to chew his ear. 
" Why," bleated the lamb, " do you thus chew my ear? " "Well, don't 
you like it !™ asked the wolf in a surly tone, "then I'll chew your throat." 
And he did so, killing the lamb instantly. Moral. — When a book agent 
starts in to chew your ear, walk right along and pretend not to notice 
him. unless yon have a stuffed club, in which case you will be justified 
in using the club. 

Persons who get their eating done at boarding-houses and restaurants, 
where it is customary to serve up flies and things in the soup and the 
coffee, will learn with alarm that the dreaded trichinie have taken up 
their quarters in that numerous pest, the common house-fly. It is a well 
understood fact that meat infested with trichinosis is entirely harmless 
when properly cooked, and the suggestion is thrown out that all insects 
of the above-named species found in the daily hash be gathered together 
and sent back to the kitchen, to be thoroughly cooked before deglutition, 
instead of being partaken of on the half-shell, as at present. 

An ingenious and Ingenuous youth "back East," gets off the fol- 
lowing ludicrous jumble of well-known lines: 

" O woman, in our hours of ease, 
Uncertain, coy, and hard to please; 
Yet seen too oft, familiar with her face, 
We first endure, then pity, then embrace." 

An Ohio girl is suffering from nervous prostration, and this is the 
cause. She worked in a millinery store where numbers of stuffed small 
birds were used in trimming hats. She loved the feathered tribe to such 
an extent that grief over their untimely fate completely upset her. Ohio 
girls, as a rule, are not so extremely sensitive as all this, and it is cheer- 
ing to learn that there is now and then an isolated case when one of them 
can get up a serious illness over a stuffed bird, other than a turkey. 

About the coolest thing in the way of an advertisement, that has ap- 
peared for a long time, had a three days' run in a local daily during the 

late heavy rain-storm. It read : " Mrs. Annie B , please call and 

get your trunk soon, as it is exposed to the weather." The advertiser 
didn't appear to be in much of a hurry, but the advertisee probably would 
be when she caught on to the fact that the baggage had been out in the 
rain for about ten consecutive days. 

The Rev. J, A. Cruzan, pastor of the Fort-Street Church, Honolulu, 
is decidedly apropos in the selection of subjects for sermons. The rev- 
erend gentleman recently preached upon the startling theme of " Short 
Beds and Narrow Covers." But, inasmuch as the natives of the Sand- 
wich Islands have neither beds nor covers, we think Mr. Cruzan would 
have hit the bull's-eye if he had announced his title as " Short of Beds 
and Nary a Cover." 

One of the last official acts of the late weather Prophet Vennor, 
was to predict that the present would be a mild winter. If Vennor can 
come no nearer bitting heaven than he came to hitting the truth, it will 
be seen that his chances of residence in a warm climate are imminent. 

Dakota wishes to be admitted into the sisterhood of States. Now is a 
good time to apply. During the cold weather national legislators will 
not be apt to refuse de coat, ah ! 

When a man dies in Sweden his relatives have a grand feast. Not 
so in this country. Here the undertakers have the feast and the rela- 
tives the funeral. 



"I really must draw tho lino somewhere," tail old Gratflngton, 
when his daughter asked him for a hundred dollars to buy aseaukia 

cloak for this cold weather. " Well, papa dear." replied the ingenuous 
creature, handing him I check all filled Dp but the. signature, " ,lraw it 

right here." Tliis broke tbe old man all up, and, as he affixed his ligna- 
ture, he meekly murmured: "These California girls beat the universe 
for cold cheek." 

Tho London Lancet says : " Certainly animals below the order of 
man never commit suicide." Has our brother forgotten the Biblical herd 
which "ran violently down a Bteep place into the tea and were 
drowned ? " 

John Kelly has been engaged bv a New York magazine to write a 
aeries of articles for its columns. His first article will be entitled, " The 
Which ness of Too Previousness, or My Fatal Kick Against 6 rover 
Cleveland." 

Visitor, to Undertaker—" Why are you so sad to-day? " Undertaker 
—"I have just buried Dr. Blank." Visitor— "Ah, indeed? The Doc- 
tor was a philanthropic gentleman." Undertaker — " He was. He threw 
many a dollar into my hands." 

" You may give me mushrooms on toast," he said, 

As be smilingly gave the waiter a tip. 
'Tis night, and the bold fungi eater is dead — 

'Twixt the mushroom and toadstool there's many a slip. 

The striking miners of the Hocking Valley are employing dynam- 
ite as an argument against the interference of non-union workmen. It 
produces very striking effects on the recalcitrants; breaks 'em all up, in 
fact. 

"The next man," says the Evansville Arqus, "that comes into this 
sanctum and uses the expression, * painting the town red,' dies." Easy, 
brother. The man who paints the town red dyes in the act. 

The Chronicle exhorts the young men of the country to produce 
gold. Tbe monthly collector endeavors to persuade them to do the 
same, but somehow our young men don't produce. 

An Oregon farmer posted the following notice on one of his fences 
last Summer : " If any man's or woman's kows or oxes gets on these oats, 
his or her's tails will be cut off, as the case may be." 

The question, Where do the umbrellas go ? will probably never be an- 
swered ; but the question of where tbey come from is already settled. 
France manufactures 7,750,000 of them annually. 

Democratic bosses are in a pickle. During the campaign, believing 
success impossible, they promised their followers everything. They are 
now puzzled how to deliver the goods. 

To-morrow, according to the latest prediction of the Adventists, the 
world will come to an end. The News Letter, however, will be issued 
on time one week from to-day. 

A Connecticut woman has endowed a chair in Princeton College 
with a feather cushion. Verily, Providence tempers the seat to the bald 
professor. 

A medical journal announces that " beer drinking tends to an en- 
largement of the heart." We think the medical authority has got the 
heart and the paunch confused. 

Kansas has a lot of petrified snakes on exhibition at New Orleans. 
They are supposed to be tbe serpents St. John Baw before he joined tbe 
Prohibitionists. 

Houses rent for $4 a year in Arabia. But they have false prophets 
there, and hence the weather is in a state of uncertainty. Every ad- 
vantage has its drawbacks. 

A Texas man has become hopelessly insane from a persistent reading 
of Talmage's sermons. It only verifies the old adage : " When De Witt's 
in the wit's out." 

New Jersey's State Treasurer is sick, and, in consequence, the 
State cannot pay even the smallest bill presented against her — not even a 
mosquito's bill. 

There is an uneasy feeling in financial circles at Vienna. Ah! We 
had not heard that any of our American bank cashiers were stopping 
there. 

Vanderhilt has foreclosed upon the property of General Grant. The 
public can now pay off an old score by saying " Vanderbilt be damned!" 

The campaign and the holidays are over, and tbe public cur has 
returned to its vomit. Numerous slogging matches are announced. 

A philosopher says : " No thoroughly occupied man is ever miser- 
able." Probably this sage never was inhabited by voracious vermin. 

" Love is blind," but the mother-in-law has an " heye like a heagle," 
and can lead her love-blind son-in-law around by the nose. 

Leading musicians are advocating a lower musical pitch. We hope 
the desired lowness will strike the scale of admission also. 

Now that the Old Year is dead, let us give him his just deserts. No 
one ever saw a better year than eighteen hundred and eight afore, 

" I have found out Spring's secret," says a poet iu Harper's. Keep 
it, for God's sake. Don't give it away to the rest of the gang. 

Soap is recommended as a radical cure for the dyspepsia. It is sup- 
posed that the recent campaign had dyspepsia. 

As roller skating was not in vogue in the Garden of Eden, we are 
still puzzled to account for the fall of Adam. 

A New York fiend chopped Mb wife with a hatchet. " I cannot tell 
a lie," said he; " I want to be a widower." 

General Logan says he can outwork any mule in Illinois. Logan, it 
will be remembered, is a Black Jack. 

A New Haven lady* worth §50,000, advertises for a husband. Coach- 
men must be scarce in Connecticut. 

A great tobacco chewer is seldom a great whistler, but he can 
play the spittoon to perfection. 

Brignoli had no money when he died, not even a tenor.— Ex. Can't 
our journalists let Brignoli a loan? 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Jan. 3, 1885 



C P R R 

Time Schedule-Sunday," Nov. '23d, 1884. 

Trains leave* and are due to arrive at, 
S[an Francisco as follows: 



L (foJ7 } DESTINATION. \ 


ARRIVE 

(from) 


8:00 a.m. 




0:40 P.M. 






11:10 a.m. 


4:00 r.M. 


*< 


10:10 A.M. 


B:00 a.m. 


CaliBtoga and Napa 


* 10:10 a.m. 


*4:<j0 p.m. 


" " " 




8.00 A.M. 


Colfax 


5.40 P.M. 


3:00 p.m. 




11:10 A.M. 


8:00 a.m. 


.... Delta, Redding and Portland 


6:40 P.M. 


3:30 p.m. 


.. j Deming:, ElPaao \Exprti-s... 
..|and East 1 Emigrant 


10:40 A.M. 


7:00 P.M, 


ti:10 a.m. 


7:30 a.m. 


....Gait and lone via Livenuore 


5:40p.M. 


•3:30 p.m. 


....Gait via Martinez. 


'10:40 A.M. 


4:00 P.M. 


.... Knight's Landing 


10:10 A.M. 


3:30 P. M. 




lu:40 A M. 


7:3u am. 


.. .Livenuore and Pleasaoton. . 


5:40 p.m. 


*5:0»P.M. 




■* 40 A.M. 


[8:00 a.m. 




0:40 P.rf. 


•9:30 A.M. 




♦3:40 P.M. 






10.40 A.M. 


8:00 A.M. 


Marvsville and Chfco 


5:40 P.M. 


3:30 P.M. 


. . J Mojave and East t Express, 
.. | " " f Emigrant 


10:40a.M. 


7:00 p.m. 


6:10 a.m. 


7:3u a.m. 


....Nilesand Haywards 


5:40 P.M. 


10:00 a.m. 


" " •* 


3:40 P.M. 


3:00 P.M. 


■« .i i' 


9:40 A.M. 


•5:00 P.M. 




*S:40 a.m. 


3:00 P.M 


.. I Ogden aud East / Express... 
.. j " " f Emigrant.. 


li:10 a.m. 


7:00 p.m. 


9:40 A.M. 


8:00 a.m. 


.. J Red Bluff ^viaMarjsville. 
.. 1 and Tehama 1 via Woudland. 


5:40 P.M. 


8:00 A.M. 


0:40 p.m. 


7:30 a.m. 


Sacramento via Livermore.. 


5:40 p.m. 


8:00 a.m. 


.... " via Benieia 


6:40 P.M. 


3:00 p.m. 


" via Benieia 


11:10 a.m. 


4:0U p.m. 


" via Benieia... . 


10:10 am. 


•4:00 P.M. 


Sacrameuto River Steamers. 


*6:00 A.M. 








tl0:00A.M. 




13:40 P.M. 


3:00 P.M. 


*■ 


9:40 A.M. 


7:30 a.m. 


....Stoektonaud "Milton via Liv- 








5:40 p.m. 


*3:30 p.m. 


... .Stockton vie Martinez 


'10:40 AM. 


*0:30 a.m. 


.. J Tulare, Fresno, I 

. . ] Madera and Merced [ 


*3:40 PJi. 


3:30 P.M. 


10:40 A.M. 


8:00 a.m. 


....Vallejo 


G:40 P.M. 






S:4Q P.M. 


- 3:00 p.m. 








■4 




3:Ui)P.m. 




11:10 a.m. 


8:00 A.M. 


.... Woodland 


0:40 P.M. 


■i:i.iy p m. 




10:10 a.m. 



Train leaving San Francisco at 8:00 A. . 
Express from Ogdnn at Vallejo Junction, 
Express from El Paso and Mojave at Pinole. 
'Sundays excepted. ^Sundays only. 



els Pacific 
and Pacific 



LOCAL FERRY TRAINS. 
From "SAN FBAJfCI SCO," Pally. 

To EAST OAKLAND— •6:00. *6:30, 7:00, 7:30, 8:00, 
8:30, 9:00, 9:30, 10:00, 10:30, 11:00, 11:30, 12:00, 12:30, 
1:00, 1:30, 2:00, 2:30, 3:00, 3:30, 4:00, 4:30, 5:00, 5:30, 
6:00, 6:30, 7:00, 8:00, 9:00, 10:00, 11:00, '12:00. 

To KRUIT VALE— '0:00, "6:30, *7:00, "7:30. *S:00, '8:30, 
•3:30, <'4:00, »4:30, »5:00, *5:30, «0:00, 5t):30. 9:00. 

To FRUIT VALE (via Alameda)— '9:30, 6:30, tllM, 
•12:00. 

To ALAMEDA— »6:00, 'fcSO, 7:00, "7:30, S:00, "S:30, 9:00, 
9:30, 10:00, (10:30, 11:00, {11:30, 12:00, (12:30, 1:00, 
(1:30, 2:00, 3:00, 3:30, 4:00, 4:30, 5:00, 5:30, 6:00, 6:30, 
7:00, 8:00, 9:00, 10:00. 11:00, *12:00. 

To BERKELEY — "6:00, «6:30, 7:00, - 7:30, S:00, «8:30, 
9:00, (9:30, 10:00, (10:30, 11:00, (11:30, 12:00, 1:00, 
2:00, 3:00, 4:00, 4-30, 5:00, 5:30, 6:00, 6:30, 7:00, 8:00, 
9:00, 10:00, 11:00, »1!:00. 

To WEST BERKELEY— «6:00, «6:30, 7:00,^7:30, (8:00, 
■8:30, 9:00, 10:00, 11:00, (1:00, 2:00, 3:00, 4:00, 1:30, 
6:00, «5:30, 6:00. °6:30, 7:00. 

To "SAW FRANCISCO." Daily. 

From FRUIT VALE-->«:23, »6:53, «7:23, ^7:53, *8:23, 
•8:53,^0:23, •10:21, "4:23. "4:53, '5:23, '6:53, '6:2o, 
*6'53 7">5 9'50 

From FRUIT VALE (via Alameda)— '5:15, "5:45, (6:45, 
(9:15, -3:15. 

From EAST OAKLAND— -5:30, '6:00. 6:30, 7:09, 7:30, 
S:00, S:30, 9:00, 9:30, 10:00, 10:30. 11:00, 11:30, 12:00, 
12:30, 1:00, 1:30, 2:00, 2:30, 3:00, 3:30, 4:00, 4:30, 5:00, 
6:30, 6:00, 6:30, 7:00. 7:57, 8:57, 9:57, 10:57. 

From BROADWAY. Oakland -»5:37, "0:07, 6:37,7:07, 
7:37.8:07,8:37,9:07,9:37,10:07,10:37,11:07,11:37,12:07, 
12:37, 1:07, 1:37, 2:07, 2:37, 3:07, 3:37, 4:07, 4:37, 5:07, 
5:37, 6:07, 6:37, 7:07, 8:06, 9:06, 10:06, 11:06. 

From ALAMEDA— '5:22, "5:52, "6:22, 6:62, '7:22, 7:52, 
•8:22, 8:52, 9:22, 9:58, (10:22, 10:52, (11:22, 11:52, 
(12:22, 12:52, (1:22, 1.52, 2:52, 3:22, 3:52, 4:22, 4:52, 
6:22, 6:52, 6:22, 6:52, 7:52, 5:52, 9:52, 10:52. 

From BERKELEY— >5:15, <5:45, "6:15, 6:45, «7:15, 7:45, 
•8:15, 8:45, (9:15, 9:45, (10:15, 10:45, (11:15, 11:45, 
12:45, 1:45, 2:45, 3:46, 4:16, 4:45, 5:15, 5:45,6:15, 6:45, 
7 - 45 S'45 9*46 10*45 

From WEST BERKELEY — »6:45, «6:15, 6:45, «7:15, 
7:46, 8:45, (9:16, 9:45, 10:45, (12:45, 1:45, 2:45, 3:45, 
4:45, *6:15, 5:45, •6:15, 0:45, '7:15. 





Creelt 


Kente. 






From SAN 


FRANCISCO- 


-•7:15, 9:15 


11:15, 


1:15, 3:15, 


5:15. 










From OAKLAND— 'O^S, 8:15, 10:15. 12:15, 2 


15, 4:15. 



•Sundays excepted. _;Sundays only. 



Pacific Standard Time furnished by Randolph & Co., 
101 Montgomery street, San Francisco. 
A. N. TOWNE, T. H. GOODMAN, 

Gen. Manager. Gen. Pass, and Tkt . Agt. 




Broad Gauge. 



COMMMENCING SUNDAY, NOV. 16th, 18S4, and 
until farther nutice, Boats and Trains will leave frrim 
and arrive at San Francisco Passenger Depot, MAR- 
KET-STREET WHARF, as follows 



Leave S. F. 


Week 
Days. 


Sundays. 


7:45 a, m. 
3:30 p. m. 


8:00 A. M. 



Destination, 



Petaluma, 

Santa Rosa, 

Fulton, 

Windsor, 

Healdsburg, 

Cloverdale 

and 

Way Stations. 



Arrive in S. F. 



Sundays, 



Days 



7:45 a. m. [8:00 a. m.| Guerneville. 1 6:00 P. m.|6:00 p.m. 



Stages connect at Santa Rosa for Sebastopol. At 
Ciairville for Skaggs Springs, and at Cloverdale fur 
Highland Springs, Kelseyville, Soda Bay, Lakeport, 
Bartlett Springs, Ukiah, Eureka, Navarre Ridge, Men- 
docino City and the Geysers. 

EXCURSION TICKETS from Saturdays to Mondays, 
to Petaluma, $1 75 ; to Santa Rosa, $3 ; to Healdsburg, 
$4 ; to Cloverdale, $5. 

EX-.TRSION TICKETS, good for Sundays only-Tn 
Petaluma, #1 50 ; to Santa Rosa, $2 ; to Healdsburg, $3; 
to Cloverdale, $4 50 ; to Guerneville, S3. 

From San Francisco for Point Tiburon and San Ra- 
fael, Week Days— 7:45 A. M., 9:10 A. M,, 3:30 P. M., 5:00 
p. M., 6:10 p. M.; Sundays: 8:00 A. M.. 10:30 A. m., 2:30 
p. H., 5:00 p. m. 

To San Francisco from San Rafael, Week Days-6:30 
a. M., 8:00 a. M., 10:20 a. M., 3:40 p. m., 5:05 p. m.; Sun- 
days: 8:10 a. M , 11:45 A. M., 3:45 P. M., 5:06 P. M. 

To San Francisco from Point Tiburon, Week Days— 
7:00 A. M., 8:20 A M., 10:45 a. m. 4:05 p. M., 5:30 p.m.; 
Sundays: S:35 A. m., 12:10 p. m., 4:10 P. M., 5:30 p. m. 

PETER J. McGLYNN. ARTHUR HUGHES. 
Gen. Pass, and Tkt. Agt. General Manager. 



SONOMA VALLEY R. R. 

Steamer JAMES 51. DONAHUE Leaves San Francisco, 

and Connects with Trains at SONOMA 

LANDING, as follows : 

4. f\A p.m., Daily (Sundays excepted), from WASH- 
• v -' v -' INGTON-STKEKT WHARF, for the Town 
f Sonoma, Gleu Ellen and Way Points. 

Sunday Excursions. 

8.QAA. m. (Sundays .»nlv), from WASHINGTON- 
.*Z\J STREET WHARF, for the Town of So- 
noma, Glen Ellen and Way Points. Round-Trip Tickets: 
To Sonoma, $1; to Glen Ellen, gl 50. 
PETER J. McGLYNN, ARTHUR HUGHES, 

Gen. Pass, and Tkt. Agt. General Manager. 



THE GAY FARE-TAKER. 

'Tis the car conductor gay, 

And he stuffs the passengers in, 
While he laughs in his sinful way, 

And watches each one spin ; 
He sees them clutch at the straps, 

He sees them lurch to the door, 
And while they get hard rap3 

Yells: " Room for just one more ! " 
Sardines in their time lie close, 

And plums are squeezed in jars, 
But not so squeezed as those 

Who ride in railway cars: 
Who gasp, aud try to stand, 

As more and more crowd in. 
Shoved by the conductor's hand 

Like sausages into skin. 

—Philadelphia News. 

About two hundred of the most desperate 
Anarchists in Paris held a meeting a few days 
ago in a hall situated in the Boulevard Charon- 
ne. The only reason that makes this f,tct worth 
chronicling is that one of the speakers boasted 
of having been justly condemned to five years' 
imprisonment for robbery. If that fact render- 
ed him any less worthy of the confidence of his 
fellow Anarchists he would, he said, kill himself 
on the spot. It is needless to add that the two 
hundred rcughs present assured him of their en- 
tire confidence, and pronounced him to be a vic- 
tim of a wicked and unjust prejudice. 

— Court Circular, 



BROAD GAUGE. 

Winter Time Schedule. 

Commencing Sunday, Nov. 16, 1884, 
And until further notice, Passenger Trains will leave 
from and arrive at San Francisco Passenger Depot 
(Townsend St., between 3d and 4th streetsl.as follows: 



DESTINATION. 



H>:50 a, 
S:30a 

10:40 A. 

<--3:30 p 
4:30 p. 

•5:lo p. 
6:30 p. 



I 
S J.. 



S:30a.m 
10:40 a.m 
*3:30 p.m. 

4:30 p.M 



San Mateo, Redwood,, 
and Menlo Park 



"\ 6:35 A.M. 
•8:10 a.m. 
0:03 a h. 
■ *10:02am. 
3:36 P.M. 
t5:02 p.m. 
0:08 P.M. 



..Santa Clara, San Joaeand. 
. .Principal Way Stations. . 



9:03 A.M 
'10:02 a.m. 
I 3:36 p.m. 
I 6:08 P.M. 



10:40 A. 

*3:30r.M.J1 ...Salinas and Monterey 



Gilroy, Pajaro, Castroville I |-*W: 



:02 a w. 
p.v. 



10:40 a.s 
'3:30 p.a 



.Hollisterand Tres Pinos. 



>P10:0 
fl 6:( 



10:40 a.m. I I Watsonville, Aptos, SoquelM fi n « P M 
*3.30 p.m H (Camp Capitola)& Santa Cruz. | 
10:40 a. M.I-; .Soledad and Way Stations. )-\ 6:08 p.m. 
•Sundays excepted. tSundays only (Sportsmen's Train). 

£STStasdard of Time.— Trains are run on Pacific 
Standard Time (Randolph & Co.), which is Ten (10) 
minutes faster than San Francisco Local Time. 



STAGE CONNECTIONS are made with the 10:40 A. M. 
Train, except PESCADERO Stages via San Mateo and 
Redwood, which connect with 8:30 a. m. Train. 

SPECIAL ROUND-TRIP TICKETS.-At Reduced 
Rates— to Monterey. Aptos. Soquel and Santa Cru2; 
also to Paraiso and Paso Robles Springs. - 

EXCURSION TICKETS 

_ „ , . ( Sold Si'sdat Mossing ; good for 

For Sundays only, \ RQlQrn same da} . 

For Saturday, ( Sold Satcroat and SrNUAYonly; 
Sunday and -J good for Return until following Mon- 
Monday (day, inclusive, at the following rates: 



Round Trip 
from San 
Francisco to 



San Bruno., 
Millbrae .... 
Oak Grove., 
San Mateo. 
Belmont .... 
Redwood., . 
Fair Oaks.., 
Menlo Park 
Mayfield.... 



ISat to Round Trip 
i Mon. from San 
Tkt. Francisco to 



75 

1 00 
1 00 

i a=i 

1 25 
1 3G 



; 50 

65 
90 
1 10 
1 25 
1 40 
1 50 
1 60 
1 75 



Mounl'nView 
Lawrences... 
Santa Clara . 
San Jose.... 

Gilroy 

Aptos 

Soqucl 

Santa Cruz.. 
Monterey .. . 



Sun. 
Tkt. 



Sat to 
Mon. 
Tkt. 



1 50 
1 75 

1 75 

2 75 



'I 25 
2 50 
2 50 

4 00 

5 00 
5 00 

5 on 

5 00 



TICKET OFFICES. - Passenger Depot, Townsend 
street; Valencia-street Station, and No. 613 Market 
street, Grand Hotel. 
A. C. BASSETT, H. R. JUDAH, 

Superintendent Asst. Pass. & Tkt. Agt. 

^- SOUTHERN DIVISIONS. ^1 
For points on Southern Divisions and the East, see 
C. P. R. R. Time Schedclb. 



A MILLION HEIR. 

Yes, I know a maiden witty, 

One so affable and pretty, 
Express to her my love I hardly dare. 

White as ivory are her teeth. 

Dimpled chin rest3 underneath, 
And her papa is a well-known millionnaire. 

Her form is just perfection, 

Faintest pink her complexion, 
In her manner she is slightly debonair, 

She has eyes of liquid blue, 

Dainty foot, a number two, 
With a papa, quite an unknown millionnaire. 

She lives across the way, 

While I flirt with her each day, 
I vow that only she my lot shall share. 

Her father will I see., 

And 6nd out can I be 
His son-in-law and little million heir. 

— Detro it Journal. 

The marriage banns between Countess Hel- 
en Bismarck, youngest daughter of Count Bis- 
marck, cousin to Prince Bismarck, and Major 
Wilfrid Cripps, son of the late W. Cripps, M.P., 
have been published. The marriage is to take 
place at an early day. Count Bismarck has al- 
ready arrived at Wynnstay, Euabon, from Ger- 
many. 



Jan 3, 1885. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



13 



"BIZ." 



Business in tlu' wholesale line of traffic i*, as usual, dull at this the 

n of the year. Not lo with the retailers and those (foaling 

in holiday ttaoy goods. Notwithstanding the inclemency of tha weather, 

•hopping, it is laid by the deiilen*, has Wen unexpectedly Rood, and they 
have reaped a com! harvest, having sold the linn's share of their holiday 
Roods, anil are qnits content with the unexpected good results that flow 
th«Tffruin. The fact is, that since the heavy runs of December our citi- 
zens have loosened their pnne-atringi not a little, feeling confident that e 
good and prosperous year was assured to them— not a year of drought 
ami uncertainty, but a year of Rood crops and a good mining reason, ae 
is always the case when we in California have an ahundant supply of 
water. In this city we have had already about 11 inches against 6 at 
same date last year, while in the country rain has been general, running 
from 2*J inches, in some places, down to 5, with a plenty of snow upon 
the mountains. 

On Sunday, the 28th Inst., the Pacific Mail steamship City of Syd- 
ney arrived from the Colonies in 24 days, with Government Mails and 
en, some 400 bales Wool, etc. The steamer stopped at Hono- 
lulu for the Mails, bringing nothing else from the Islands. 

Hawaii.— The arrivals from the Islands during the week includes 
schr. Bosario, 10 days from Kahului, with 2,100 ba^s Su-ar and S3 bchs. 
Bananas. Schr. Eva, 15 dayB from Honolulu, with 5,600 pki^s. Snsar, 
340 bags Rice, 73 bales WooL BriL' CV>rmielo, 10 Java from same, with 
L,995bags Bios, 1,643 bags Sugar and 28U bbls. Molasses. The schr. 
Ciaadina, 10 days from Hilo, brought 2,240 bags Sugar, 252 
Hides, etc 

The Pacific Mall Steamship Granada, hence for Panama and way- 
ports, Garded en route for New York: 48,745 galls. Native Wine, 1,248 
galls. Crape Brandy and 300 flasks Quicksilver. For Central America— 
4.000 bbls. Flour, 18,000 feet Lumber, 12,622 lbs. Tallow, 800 ctls. 
Wheat, etc 

Latest Grain Charters.— Br. ship Forest King, 1,602 tons, Wheat to 
Cork, V. K., Havre or Antwerp, £1 12s. 6d. Ship Henrietta, 1,269 tons, 
Wheat to Cork, Havre or Antwerp, £1 I03. ; to a direct port, 2a. 6d. less. 
At the close £2 offered for Br. iron ships to U. K. 

Philadelphia.— The ship St. Stephen, 137 days, to Sutton & Beebe, 
brought a cargo of General Mdse. 

Liverpool.— Ship Ericcson, 152 days, had, for cargo, 1,931 tons 
Coal, etc. 

Star of Erin.— This British ship arrived 23 days from Acapulco, in 
ballast to Balfour, Guthrie & Co. 

Malpas.— The Br. ship Blengfell, hence on 26th, carried 17,664 bbls. 
Flour, valued at 870,656. 

Victoria.— Stmr. Mexico, for British Columbia, carried general cargo, 
valued at $27,000. 

Charter.— Br. iron ship Caitloch, 1,264 tons. Wheat to Cork, U. K., 
£2 2s. 6d.; chartered prior to arrival. 

The Wheat Market is quiet, with free receipts and liberal exports. 
We quote No. 1 White, SI 25@1 27k ; extra choice White Milling, $1 30 
CaSl 321 $ cental. On Call, saleB 1,100 tons No. 1 White, buyer season, 
SI 36£ ; 400 ditto ditto City, SI 373; 300 tons ditto, SI 36g ; 400 tons, 
SI 36; 300 tons, SI 362 $ cental. 

Barley.— Spot sales light. No. 1 Feed, 95c; No. 2, 85c; Brewing, SI 
@1 12i tfctl.; buyer season, SI 08; seller ditto, 93£c; buyer January, 
95c. ; ditto February, SI $ cental. 

Corn.— The market is dead and lifeless at $1@S1 20 per cental for all 
grades. 

Oats.— Arrivals from the North are free and liberal. No. 1— SI 25 @ 
SI 30 per ctl. No. 2— 95c @S1 15. Extra Choice— SI 40@$1 50. 

Rye.— Demand good at SI 15@S1 25 per ctl. 

Bran.— Spot Sales at S18@$19 50 per ton. 

Hops. — Dull of sale at llc.@15c. 

Tallow.— Supply is free and liberal at 7§c@8c, for best refined. 

Wool, — The demand is light, and prices both low and nominal. 

Poultry and Game.— The stormy weather has cut off supplies, and 
prices rule high. 

Fruit.— The market is well supplied with Apples, Oranges, Bananas, 
and other seasonable varieties. 

Butter, Cheese aud Eggs.— The rains have lessened Spot supplies 
and in consequence prices rule high. 

Coal.— Receipts liberal, of both Foreign and Domestic, but with heavy 
store supplies prices remain unchanged. 

Metals. — The market is flat and prices nominal for all descriptions. 

Coffee, Sugar, Rice and Teas,— Stocks are both free and liberal, and 
prices remain unchanged. 

Lumper,— The Br. iron bark Sidlaw, 499 tons, loads Lumber fur Co- 
quimbo. 

Quicksilver.— The market is flat ; recent small sales at S33@35 per 
flask. 

Hides.— We quote Dry at 16c@17c. 



King-Morse Canning Co. — This firm puts up the finest quality of 
Mushroom, Walnut and Tomato Ketchup ever before placed on the Cali- 
fornia market. 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Hale *fc Sonrim, Silver MlnJus; Company. I.orut.on of 
Principal Pltoo ol Business, Ban Francisco, California Location ■ ■, w^rkn, 
\ Irjflnla Mining i>i*tnri. Btorej oounty, Nevada, V-' 
mooting- of tho Board ol Directors, held on tha 8tb d&j ol December, 1884, an 

Mooument (No, S3} ol I'iiu Ceo1 peril wu levied upon the ■ 

the oorponuon, payable Immediately, In United States gold ouln, to the Be 
el the office of the company, Room 68, Nevada Block, ho. 800 Kontgomorj 
Sim FranolscOi California. 

Am stock upon which tiii^ assessment shall remain unpaid on the 
Thirteenth Day ol J unit iry, 1883, 
win be delinquent and advertised f"r sale at public auotlon; and unl< i 
mads before, will be sold on Tuesday, the 8d doyol February, 1886, to paj the 
delinquent assess nt, together with coal -if advertising and expenses "f sale, 

Bj order of the Board ol Directors. JOEL P. LIOHTNEB, Secretary. 

Office— Room 68, Nevada Block, Mo. 800 Montgomery street, Ban Francisco, Cal. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

The German Savings ami Loan Nortel y. For the half-venr 
ending Dec. 81st, 1884, the B.«ird <>f Directors of THE GERMAN s.u INGS 
AND LOAN SOCIETY has declared a Dividend on term deposits at the rate ol tour 

and thirty-two oue-liundredths (4 3'2-lQO) per cent, pur annum, and on ordinary 
deposits at the rate of three and six-tenths (3 0-10) per cent, per annum, and pay- 
able on and after the 2d day of January, 1SS5. By order. 
(Dee. 27.] GEO. LETTE, Secretary. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

San Francisco Savings Union. 533 California afreet, cor- 
ner Webb. For the half-year ending with 81st December, iss4, a dividend has 
been declared at the rate of four and thirty-two one-hundredths (4 32-100) per cent, 
per annum on term deposits, and three and six-tenths (3 0-10) per cent, per annum 
on ordinary deposits, free of taxes, payable on and after Friday, 2d January, iss. r >. 
[Dee. 20. J LoYELL WHITE, Cashier. 

AMERICAN EXCHANGE HOTEL, 

SANSOME STREET, COR HALLECK, SAN FRANCISCO. 

This hotel is in the very center of the busin^es portion of the eity, and has been 
renovated and newly furnished throughout. The traveling public will find this to 
be the most convenient aswtllas the most comfortable and respectable hotel, In the 
City. TABLE FIRST CLASS. Board and Room, SI, $1 25 and SI 50 per day. Nice 
Single Rooms, per night, 50 cents Breakfasts or Dinners, 50 cents. Lunch, 25 
Cents. Eighteen Tickets, good for any meals, $5. Hot and Cold Baths, free. Free 
Coach to and from the hotel. April 12. 

~S. P. TAYLOR & CO., 

Successors to A. BUSWELL & CO., 

GSJ5 CLAY ST., BOOK-BINUEBS, 

SAM FRANCISCO, California. 



MOUNT VERNON COMPANY, BALTIMORE. 

The undersigned having been appointed AGENTS FOR THE PACIF C COAST 
for the sale of the manufactures of above company, have now in store: 

Sail Duck— all Numbers; 
Hydraulic— all Numbers: 
Draper and Wagon Duck, 

From 30 to 120 Inches Wide, and a Complete Assortment of All Qualities 28£-Iue 
DUCK, from 7 ozs. to 15 ozs., inclusive. 

MURPHY, GRANT & CO. 



Steinway & Sons, 
Kranieh & Bach, 



\ pianos! r: 



ERNST OABLER, 



ROENI5CH. 



M. GRAY, 
206 Post street, San Francisco. 

ZEITSKA INSTITUTE, 

NO. 922 POST STREET. 

French, German and English Day and BoardiiiK-ScbooI for 
Young Ladies and Children, with KINDERGARTEN. 
Term commenced October 3d, 18S4. Address MME. E. ZEITSKA, 
[Sept. 27.] Principal. 

Miss Traver and Mrs. L. A. K. Clappe's 

SEIECT SCHOOt FOR YOUNG LADIES AND CHILDREN, 

AT HASTINGS-ON-HUDSON, WESTCHESTER COUNTY, N. Y. 
Number pupilB limited to fifteen. Send for Catalogue. May 3. 



JOSEPH GILLOTT'S STEEL PENS. 

Gold Medal, Paris, 1S7S. 

Cjiold by all Stationers. Sole Agent lor tbe United States: 

Q MR. HENRY HOE, 91 John street, N. Y. Jan. 5. 



ALASKA COMMERCIAL COMPANY 

No- 310 Sansome Street, 

San Francisco, 

WHOLESALE DEALERS IN EVES, 

R. J. MAG-TJIRE & CO., 

COAL!-WHOLESALE AND RETAIL. 

[Telephone No. 383.] 206 and 208 Foleom Street. 

AT) "D T 7 ~CT Send six cents for postage, and receive free, a costly box 
X L\. ± Zrf Ht • of goodo which will help nil, of either sex, to more money 
right away than anything else in this world. Fortunes await the workers absolute'y 
lore. At once address Teoe & Co., Augusta, Maine. 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Jan. 3, 1885 



MAG'S LETTER. 

Dear N, L.: "A Happy New Year to you 'n all your folks." {La me! 
I've heard that so ofteu o' late it seems like I was a sayin* it in my Bleep). 
Well, it was a comfort to see the sun a shinin', warn't it, after so much 
horrid rain. You just bet this child was glad to see it anyhow, 'n I think 
't the pokey old farmers 've had enough moisture for a while 't any rate. 
Some o' the geniuses 't prowls round 'n picks up items o' thought must a 
distributed my idea 'bout givin' needful presents, as I hear 't lots o' folks 
got just what they wanted most, 'n haven't the very fiist idea from whom 
it came. I've tried to make a list from mem'ry, as I heard, to show you 
how thoughtful the givers was. The old Judge (our Judge) got a pickled 
toDgue (his own is spicy enough}; Stuart Taylor, an olive branch tied to 
a rooster's leg, with the compliments o' the Democratic party. (As this 
comes from Stockton, the Colonel thinks it's a kind o' crazy proceedin', *n 
d«n't take no stock in it). Old man Judge Wallace, he got a packet o' 
"ready relief;" old Mr. Hoge a 'lluminated copy o' Ten Little Niggers sit- 
tin' in a line (Tom Bell sent that, I guess, 'cause Ned says *t his house is 
a hatchin' nest for nig's); Reub. Lloyd, a big case o' " sweeties "; Webb 
Howard, he got a bundle o' French kisses— in a horn o' plenty; N«d Hall 
a comfort (was that a spread, I wonder?) Bill Dewey, a pass for a voyage 
to the North Pole (he's gone a'ready in that direction); Scott Wilson, the 
same thing as Ned Hall (they both have the same need always, though in 
this case what's to Ned a comfort may prove to the other a counter-pain). 
Old Luning got a toy savings-bank, in the shape of a Venus; Judge Ha- 
ger a stick o' candy from that place under the Palace Hotel (he's been 
hankerin' after it through the window for a awful long time); General 
Williams a White Thorn burr (I reckon he'd better look out it don't stick 
him); Horace Davis a little faded flower (one 'd think he had a supply o' 
that article sufficient for his wants); Irving Scott, several illustrated 
copies o' " Marmion." But, la me, I ain't got no time to tell you all 't 
I've heard, 'n some I wouldn't like to mention for fear o' makin' trouble 
in fam'lies. 

For instance, I won't tell what F. sent the Bank President {'cause his 
wife might have ap'poplexy if she knew 'bout that *' joy " o' Mb). 

Altbea's gift to old man Tyler was o' such a character 't if I was to 
tell, they'd be bringin' a suit, not o' foreclosure, but disclosure. The 
Judge asked us last night if we'd heard the sensation caused the other 
day when the Plaintiff said, "Now we'll go for alimony." Every one 
thought the Archbishop was to be brought in to tie the knot accordin' to 
the Judge's faith, 'n was waitin' to see the performance. I reckon they'll 
have to wait a long time to see anything real in that case. 

What do you think I've been doin'? Makin' up riddles like the Judge 
does. I began on Bess. Says I : " Why can a certain person, 't shall 
be nameless, turn you from a brunette into a blonde ? " Says she: " Gild 
me with gold?" (Not so bad that). But that wan't the answer. 'Twas 
because " He'll make you fair." Hess looked real sweet to the openin' 
night o' the op'ra. Sakes alive ! what a house that was — 'most every 
high-toned fam'ly in town. The Crockers was in a proscenium box, 'n 
Mrs. Crocker threw Abbott the flowers from her dress. (Ned said 't 
there was a diamond pin along, but I don't believe it). Lucky Baldwin 
n his last wife was in the big box op'site, 'n, o' course, the Di-nphys was 
on hand in another. (It's got as though it wouldn't be like op'ra unless 
they had a stage box). Mrs. Fair 'n party was in another, 'n up in the 
top one the little lady 't acts so well in private theatricals, 't all the boys 
is so mashed on, 'cause she's so awful good to 'em, 'n gives 'em candy, 'n 
so forth. Ain't it real comical the way 't folks '11 crowd a theatre jmt 
for fashion's sake? Why, Ned 'n me was a lookin' round an' countia' 
noses, 'n I declare we saw the whole o' society 'most. The Schmidells 
was in one o' the boxes to the back (Nettie's lovely gray eyes lookin' like 
stars, *n little Mattie 's bright 's a new dollar). Cora was a sittiu' in one, 
too, 'n was real sweetly costoomed. Down in the parquette was Helen, 
lookin' as pretty as a pink in one of her Paris toilettes. (Ain't it nice to be 
able to bring a lot o' tine dresses from Paris) ? The Newlands outfit was on 
hand — the newly-married Doc 'n his bride, his cousins 'n his aunts. 
(Ned says 't that fam'ly always reminds him of Pinafore). Old man 
Prather was a sittiu' up 's large as life. Willie Garnett, o' course. (Did 
you ever go to the theatre without seein' him ) ? Another Bessie bride 't 
is to be was with some friends ; Lilo, in a bewitchin' op'ra cloak ; pretty 
Mrs. Maurice Schmidt, hospitable Mrs. Goad 'n fam'ly,. the Irving 
Scotts, the Clark Crockers, the Henry Scotts, Herzsteins, 'n oh ! lots o 
others 't I can't call to mem'ry just now. 

The Oakland widdah's suit 's lookin' up, 'n she's gettin' quite offish with 
old Tom. That reminds me o'one o' the Judge's last conundrums : " Why 
does the fascinating Oakland widow* betray a weakness for spiritual 
things?" " La me," Bays ma, " has she got religion?" " You bet," says 
I, " 't there's a private secretary racket somewhere ; a good-lookiu' fool of 
a curate, 'n so forth." " Nay, Mag, my amiable friend," says the Judge, 
" because she's addicted to Old Tom " (gin). 

Next week I'll tell you all 'bout New Year's calls, 'cause Ned 's goin' 
to keep a list o' the prettiest wimmen, 'n the prettiest dresses (not always 
the same, you know). I hear 't a four-in-hand team 's goin' rouud, with 
a lot o' bank insurance *n grain clerks, 'n they say 't all sorts o' outfits 'U 
be to be seen. The Spanish Students is goin' in detachments o' four each, 
cloaks 'n all {I gues3 some young men 't we girls could name '11 fill the 
bill o' the spoon racket). 

Ned says 't old man Luning was tryin', at the Club last night, to get 
some men to go shares with him in hirin' some o' the school 'busses to 
take 'em round, but the scheme wouldn't work. Two fellahs 't I know 
are a-goin* round in a two- wheeled cart belongin' to a young lady friend; 
but as one of 'em is awful hefty, I reckon it '11 tip before the end o' the day 
I asked the Judge a riddle by myBelf, 'n I'm just goin' to tell it to you: 
" Why will the men resemble unopened bottles o' champagne by night- 
time?" He guessed: " Because they '11 be shut up." (Now wan't that 
real stupid o' the Judge)? " No," says I, " 'cause they '11 all be full." 

I guess I'll atop now, and once more wish you " a happy New Year 
'n lots of joy. Mag. 

J. TOMKINSON'S LIVERY AND SALE STABLE, 

Nos. 57, 50 and 61..... Minim street, 

Bet. First and Second, San Francisco. One Block from Palace Hotel. 
Also Carriages and Cabs at Pacific Club, No. 130 Post street; also Northeast Corner 
Montgomery and Bush streets. Vehicles of Every Description at Reduced Rates. 
TELEPHONE No. 153. July 26. 



SLOGGING. 

Every male animal has a fighting instinct, and men devoid of it are 
poor material. The instinct is a natural one, and every man, therefore, 
ought to be able to defend himself against aggression, or inflict punish- 
ment upon an enemy when it becomes necessary to do so. Common sense 
should keep people from doing violence, but sometimes circumstances not 
only invite but demand aggression, and sometimes defense compels it. As 
a rule most healthy men, educated and law-abiding, polite and chivalric, 
think they can fight. This is a popular falacy, as can readily be deter- 
mined when one sees the professional sloggerat work. But few men, other 
than professional sloggers, have developed either muscle or wind sufficient 
to either hit an effective blow, or to fight to their full ability for three 
minutes. A very little man, who knows how to hit, can knock a very 
large man silly in a very small space of time. Courage is the great dis- 
tinguishing quality between men. Without it the most admirable con- 
stituent in them is put to shame and defeat at the hands of some brain- 
less, brutish mongrel, who has learned the tricks of hitting and getting 
away. The churchly view is against slogging. Refinement and senti- 
mentality are against it. High manhood, from a chivalric standpoint, 
looks upon it as low. But we think a better class of sound-thinking peo- 
ple believe every man ought to be able to defend himself, or punish 
offensive people without resorting to deadly weapons. 

The art of self-defense is truly a manly art, but it is not a profession 
or a business with manly men. It is very necessary, however, that there 
should be a class of men who do make it a business to box and slog, so 
that the better class of people may be able to learn from them the tech- 
nicalities of the fistic science. Attempts are made, by fits and starts, to 
interdict hard glove fiyhts. This is a questionable policy. A prize-fight 
is brutal and demoralizing, and with its twin barbaric sister, the duel, 
ought to be punished severely by la.v, and condemned by public opinion. 
A hard L^lnve contest to a finish, as the polite phrase now runs, is not 
brutal, because within a minute after the knocked-out party has lost his 
ten Beconds he is generally telling the audience he has just been sick with 
a fever, that his hand was disabled, that he was out of condition, etc., 
etc.; but in two weeks he is again willing to meet his man for another 
hard scrap. The recuperative puwer of a knocked-out fighter is Bome- 
thiug marvelous, and the celerity with which he gets up to dress and find 
the bar. in company with hia late successful opponent, will astonish the 
patient observer. 

Many thoughtful minds have, after grave deliberation, come to believe 
that gentlemen and gentlemen's sons should seek instruction from the 
better class of professional fighters, and learn not only how to spar, but 
to hit effectively, as a means of defense against brutal assault. Better 
far to overcome a man by natural means than to employ a weapon with 
fatal result. Gentlemen ought to be expert in the manly art, ought to en- 
courage its development, and ought to prevent the ranks of professional 
boxers being recruited fro m the criminal classes. 

BUSINESS CHANGES. 

At this season of the year there is usually quite a number of changes 
in the make-up of firms engaged in business. The principal ones we have 
noticed this year, so far. are ; 

The substitution of Messrs. Blake, Motfitt & Towne for the firm of 
Blake, Robbins & Co. This simply means that that portion of the es- 
tate of the late Mr. Robbins, which was invested in this firm, has been 
withdrawn, and the business will be carried on as heretofore. 

The firm of C. Adoluhe Low & Co. has also undergone a change. In 
future it will exist as a special partnership, and be known under the firm 
name and style of Messrs. E. L. G. Steele & Co. 

The firm o c Dickson, De Wolf & Co., has been renewed, and the name 
and Btyle of its London branch changed from Campbell, Heatley & Co., 
to Heatley, Yatton & Co. 

The firm of Moore, Hunt & Co. have removed from Market street to 
No. 404 Front street, where they have fitted up convenient and luxu- 
rious quarters. Indeed, their private offices are perfect fairy palaces, and 
convey a useful hint to other business men, for surely one should pay a 
little attention to the surroundings of the place where one spends the 
greater portion of the day. 

Charles Melnecke & Co,, of No. 314 Sacramento street, constitute 
one of the oldest and most reliable firms engaged in business in San Fran- 
cisco. Their specialty is importing and acting as agents for the Standard 
Champagne wines, manufactured by Messrs. Deutz & Gelderman. 
These embrace the Cachet Blanc, Tres Sec— Extra Dry, and Cabinet 
Green Seal, in pints, quarts and baskets. The firm also represents those 
fine Bordeaux Red and White Wines, in the original cases, from Messrs. 
A. de Luze & Fib, and the celebrated Hock Wines, put up in cases by 
G. M. Pabstmann Sohn, Mainz. From this it will readily be seen that 
persons who are desirous of obtaining a first-class article of table wine of 
any description, can find what they want at this firm's establishment, 
and the reputation for fair dealing acquired and maintained by the firm, 
during the long period it has been in business, is a sure guarantee that 
every bottle will be exactly as represented. 

Messrs. Raphael Weill & Co., of the famous White House, corner of 
Kearny and Post streets, are still exhibiting a magnifieent array of spe- 
cial articles in all departments. Among other things, they have real 
India Shawls at prices lower than anything ever seen in tbis city; Combina- 
tion Suits; French Silk Patterns in plain colors, and with combination of 
Broche Satins; Fans of all kinds from the plainest to the moBt elaborate; 
Bronzes; elegant Art Pottery; Bisque; Gents' Furnishing Goods; Turkish 
RugB; Furniture Fringes; Handkerchiefs of all descriptions; rich materials 
f >r Lambrequins; C ard Cases, etc. 

One of the largest salmon ever known to have been taken from a 
European river, was netted a few days ago in the Tay, near the mouth i f 
the Almond, a few miles above Perth. The weight was estimated at 
about 80 lbs. The fish was 5 feet in length and 2 feet 5 inches in girth. 
It was a male, fresh run, and in splendid condition. It was returned to 
the river, having been captured in the course of the operations which are 
being carried on to provide for the annual stocking of the hatcheries at 
Stormontfield and Dupplin, which have been very successful this season. 



A Solution of the Mormon Question— More men. 



' 



JftQ S, 1835 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



I ft 



CRADLE. ALTAR, AND TOMB. 



CRADLE. 

■ 
H*^N»rr In ti I, to tho wife of E " BenneU, a daughter 

iii this . iiv, Dm '.'t. t.. the vita ••( Patrice Connolly, i daughter. 
Caaaoirroai in tin- olty. Dm '-'- t«> tin- vrlfo .if l> .1. * relghton, 1 dawrhter. 

ai Portlaud, Onion. Dec. •>:>, to tin- wlfo «>( Robert hfc, .1 800. 
i;m!h\kj>kl,u -in this city, Dec 17, to the irlfeal D, QhiimrdeUl, Jr., a son. 
Btmax In tin- ■ the «i(c of 1. Hymaa, 

llu- wife *'( Isaac 1>. Levy, a WD. 

Uvurx In tin- .iii. Dee. 14, to Ibe wife ■( Philip C. Moore, « dau^'Mer 
Deo 88, i" tin- wi(. of w. II. Rfaraton. 

PUMim— In ti r, to Ihe wife Of D I. Perkins, ii diuiyliter. 

stahl in toll dly.Dec 27. t<> the wife .<f J. .) suhi. a daughter. 

t.. tho wife ..f Samuel T.LiissiL.', k daughter. 
TiloMAM-lii this city, Dec. &l, to the wife ..f F. U. Thomas, a son. 

ALTAR. 

• Huron Deo, 14, Oscar P. andenouto Annie Hundley. 

irr-Oarr— Dot 84, Enoch 11 Chevalier to Edith J. Curr, both of this city. 

a hkatlkv -l>ec. ->. Alincmn Gross to Annie M. Wheatlcy, both of this city, 

id-Oruyrr Dee 86, William A. Balatead to Hay LtGrover, both of this city. 
IIill,kk-Stm,i. Dec. M. Herman P. BlUer to Sidlo Ef. Still, both of this city. 
Mi Lku.av Joararroii -Dec 8ft, EL a. IfcLetlsn t" Mrs. .seiina Johnston. 

r-Oumax- Dec. 26, Nili Nllsson to Alma Ohman. 
BiarmiSD-Bmiui -Jlih. 1, Prod ■' Biefrled t" Mis- Grace D. Emeric. 
Williams- Vailks -Dee. 21, Bogenc Williams to Mary Vuiles, both of this city. 
Wiikxlkk-Doi'ulas— Dec. 25, Clarence K. Wheclur to Jennie Douglas. 

TOMB. 
A&AMS- Doe. 25, James Adams, a native of Bristol, En-land, a^cd 29 years. 
Ahlkk- Dec 19, Mn Leonora Slmoosen Adler, ofjed 25 years, 1 month and 6 days. 

Inhn Boll, :i native of Kn_'l,onl, u-e.l 65 years. 

::., Ann Btddlek, .1 native of Cornwall, England, aged li years. 
LMI Dec 88, Robert P. Cochrane, aged SO years. 
QirroRD— Dec. 28. Charles E Qifford, a native of Canada, aged 51 years. 
N\ 1 Dm 20, Captain David Nye, * native of Wareham, Massachusetts, aged G3 years. 
PLATT-Dec. 30. James Madison Piatt, a native of New York, aged 75 years. 
Tkk ah well -Dec 27. James Parker Tre^dwull. a native .if IpRwitch, Massachusetts. 
Wallace— Dec. 31, Edward James Wallace. ogc*l -'■'• years, s months and 13 days. 

DEPRESSION IN MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES. 

The managers of Bradstreet's New York Commercial Reports have 
undoubted facilities for procuring accurate information in regard to com- 
mercial and industrial affairs throughout the United States. Last week 
twenty columns of the paper were devoted to an investigation of the in- 
dustrial position of twenty-two of our leading States. If the figures re- 
ported are in the main correct, then the national industrial couditiou of 
the country demands serious attention. The line of States begins with 
Maryland, passes to Virginia, West Virginia, Kentucky and Missouri, 
and includes all States north of that line. The year of comparison named 
is 1880. Why this is done we do not understand, except that the object 
is to show that in four years we have gone backwards at almost every in- 
dustrial step. Since 1880 there has been a falling-off from 20 to 33 per 
cent, in the employe's of the iron-workers, the variation being between 
the seaboard and interior. The wages paid for the present year show re- 
ductions Bince 1880, averaging from 20 to 30 per cent. 

The reductions in the iron forces are the largest — 33 to 20 per cent.; the 
downward scale is kept amongst glaasworkers, tobacco operatives, woolen 
mill hands, shoemakers, until the lowest figures, 12J per cent., are reached 
in the cotton mills. 

The present number of industrial employes is put down at 2,452,749, 
which is 316,249 less than was reported in 1880. This looks like a falling 
off of 100,000 a year, which appears to be altogether too large but for 
the following: In 1880 there were 421,000 employe's in blast furnaces, roll- 
ing mills and kindred industries. The present returns indicate that 
80,000 have been dispensed with. If a single branch of industry has 
been compelled to let out 80,000 men, or 20,000 a year, it is not difficult 
to account for 80,000 being dispensed with in the other heavy labor-using 
manufactories. 

In New York, New England, Pennsylvania and Ohio, the clothing 
operatives ha\e diminished 35,000 within a year, and since 1880 the falling 
off Las been 27 per cent. 

The accuracy of these figures is supported by the proportionate decline 
in all other employments. One branch of manufacturing cannot go down 
without taking a neighbor with it. The iron trade has been the greatest 
sufferer, and the fact has been patent to every one who has intelligently 
watched the commercial reports of the country for the past four years. 
Woolen goods, clothing and boots and shoes have kept each other close 
company. Here it i-i impossible to tell what has become of all these dis- 
charged workers. Doubtless they have sought and found other modes of 
earning a living. And while these immense reductions have been made, 
the evil may not be so great as it appears. 

In 1880 manufacturing was pushed to its extremest limits. Everything 
was overcrowded and overdone. To-day the country may be really in a 
more hopeful condition than it was four years since. Few goods are be- 
ing manufactured that are not in demand; hence burdensome surplus 
stocks are not being stored up. The worst feature is the reduction of 
wages. We see very little chance of old rates being paid in the future. 
But, if compensations come in cheaper — bread, meat and fuel — the 
worker need not complain. We think that result must follow. 

The eagerly-expected "Life of George Eliot," by her husband, Mr. 
John Cross, will be published by Messrs. Blackwood shortly after Christ- 
mas, in three small volumes. The work was finished early in the Autumn, 
and Mr. Cross has just completed the final revision of the proof-sheets. 
The book will contain a great number of most interesting letters, written 
by George Eliot to Mrs. Bray and other intimate friends, and numerous 
extracts from her journals and note-books. 



Don't patronize a grocer who does not give "you freshly-toasted Tea, 
which retains all the pristine flavor and aroma of the herb. Richards, 
Harrison & Sherwood's Automatic Tea Ftrer enables every retailer to do 
his own toasting. Retailers who are too lazy to avail themselves of this 
invention are unworthy of patronage. 



CLEVELANDS INAUGURATION. 
Extensive preparations are being made for the inauguration of 
President Cleveland, It i* proponed " bo have in the Inaugural praooe- 
nion a battalion, "><hj men strong, of veterani of the late civil war, mme in 
the I Dion Army and some in the Confederate Army. General Banoook i* 
mentioned for Grand Marshal of tbe hay, ami his staff in to be selected 
from the most gallant soldiers in the late war, to be made up of iMjujil 
numbers From both armies, in the parade it. is intended, bo Ear 
aible, to have the representatives of the Southern States alternate in or- 
der with those from the Northern States -each carrying the flag of their 
State an well as that of the United states." 

This pageant, bo the proposers argue, will be " a Bolemn and conclusive 
declaration that the war which ended nearly twenty years ago should be, 
and is, remembered now by those who participatod'in it upon cither side, 
not as a continual source of bitterness, but as the highest proof 
of American valor, and that the soldiers of the Confederate Army not 
only accept all the results of the war. hut are to-day entirely loyal to the 
flag and to the Government of the United States, and are ready and 
willing to bear arms in support thereof whenever called upon by the law- 
ful authorities." The plan is meeting with much popular encouragement. 
It can certainly do no harm, and if it shall aid in the complete reunion 
and frindship of the North and South, it will be a blessing for which its 
advocates shall deserve and receive the thanks of the nation. 



After many years, the sequel to a strange story has been made 
known in Paris. Since 1857, a M. Angoit, carrying on business as a com- 
mission agent in Paris, bad disappeared mysteriously and under very ex- 
traordinary circumstances. It is related that on a certain January morn- 
ing in that year he was married, the wedding breakfast taking place at a 
restaurant in the Palais Royal. Whilst it was proceeding the bridegroom 
was in formed by a waiter that a coachman downstairs desired to speak 
with him, and he left the table, the guests expecting him to return in a 
few minutes. He was never heard of from that day, the last that was 
seen of him being at the entrance of the restaurant, where a cab was 
waiting, which he entered, bareheaded, and in his wedding suit. 

All the endeavors of the police, all the efforts of his frieeds and discon- 
solate wife to obtain tidings of him, were utterly fruitless, and the latter, 
resuming her maiden name, went to reside with a sister. Recently, how- 
ever, a sportsman, while in the mountains near Seo d'Urgel, killed an 
animal, which fell into a deep crevice. He went after it, and then came 
upon a skeleton, to which some clothing was still hanging. In the pocket 
of a coat an envelope bearing the name, M. Angoit, with the Paris ad- 
dress of the commission agent, was found, *and doctors, on being con- 
sulted, expressed their belief that death had occurred ten years or so ago. 
How the deceased came by his death, however, or what induced him to 
abandon bis bride, is still as great a mystery as ever. 

Certain unaccommodating street-car lines of this city are offen- 
sively particular in the matter of the presentation of transfers. Change- 
car tags are given and received only at the intersection of certain streets. 
But sometimes a passenger has business a block or two distant from the 
prescribed point, and if he enters a car at any other than the stipulated 
location, is impolitely informed that his transfer is " no good. ' The com- 
panies claim that they have established this rule to prevent being im- 
posed upon by the presentation of transfers by others than the persons 
entitled to ride. This is folly; since there is nothing to hinder the " im- 
postor,' if he is such, from entering the car at the required point and 
thus completing his fraud. The man who pays his way is entitled to his 
ride, and it ought to make no difference to the car company if he sees 
tit to walk one or two blocks on his route of travel. The transfer should 
be good at any point on the line. It is a guarantee to carry, and the 
company issuing it haB no moral right to refuse it, wherever presented. 
The " particular street" rule is practically a failure, so far as the preven- 
tion of fraud is concerned, while as a disaccommodation of regular patrons 
it is a glorious and offensive success. Let the car companies exercise a 
little discretion. 

Color Blindness. — An amusing Btory is told of the great English 
chemist Dalton, who was red-blind, and also a Quaker. When about to 
be presented at court, he learned that he must wear a scarlet coat as a 
part of his court dres3. This he refused to do, from conscientious scru- 
ples. But his friends were determined that he should be presented, and, 
knowing his infirmity, dressed him in a coat of the regulation shade, 
gravely informing him that it was of a dark hue ; and as he was unable to 
tell the difference, he wore the objectionable color without being aware 
that he was violating his religious principles. 



There are 136, C JO fishermen in France. The coast fisheries provide 
employment for only 53,000 of this great force, so that 83,000 French 
fishermen make their livelihood out of foreigu waters. The value of fish 
captured in 1883, was 4,289,075 lbs., of which more than three millions 
worth were drawn from outside their own waters. About four fishermen 
out of every thousand are drowned during the year. 



RESIDENCE IN ALAMEDA 



To Let, Furnislied.. 



Fine well-built House of Seven Rooms, Bath and Modern Improvements; situ" 
ated on a sunny corner, 50x150 feet. 
Convenient to both C. P. R. R- and S. P. C. R. R. local trains. 
The Highest Land in Alameda aud most Healthful Locality. 
Perfectly Sewered; Lovely Garden; Chicken Yard; Young Orchard. 
Beautiful Shade Trees surround the property. 



" For Further particulars address 



P. O. BOX 2344, S. F. 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Jan. 3, 1885. 



A LOVE QUARREL. 

That scornful word, bow soon 'twas said ! _ 
That slight revenged, when none was giv'n! 

Then swift the tongue's sharp arrows sped, 

At which, through twinned hearts deeply driv'n, 
Sweet love in terror fled. 

Much tried he me, my bosom's lord, 

Suspecting that and hinting this: 
I raged ; taunts, which my heart abhorred 

When spoke, I launched, no point to miss, 
And stabbed him with each word. 

Come here, my greyhound, faithful thou, 
While faithless he who gave thee proves ; 

Smoothing in all my grief thy brow, 
I marvel if his fancy moves 
To me repentant now. 

Perchance those hasty words regret 

Would fain recall — each haughty look ; 
Patient his wish I might have met ; 

There ! the gate clicked — doth he yet brook 
Love'B toils, love's gilded net ? 

My heart's love comes- 'twere wise to pout ; 

A girl with spirit should behave ; 
And yet, methinks, I might him float 

Till love withdrew the boon it gave, 
And coldness followed doubts. 

The door opes — up perplexed I start ; 

Timid yet confident he stands ; 
Begone, distrust ! no more apart 

Should lovers dwell— I seize his handB, 
And nestle next his heart. 

— Casselfs Magazine. 

AUSTRALIAN AND NEW ZEALAND NOTES 

The Steamship City of Sydney arrived last Monday, bringing ad- 
vices up to the 29th November.— —An exhibition in celebration of the 
first half century of the history of the Colony of Victoria is now in 
progress in Melbourne. - — A trial of reaping and binding machines for 
the prize offered by the National Agricultural Society took place at 
Moonee Ponds, near Melbourne, recently. Nine machines competed — 
two English and the rest American. The first prize was awarded to 
Hornsby's machine, and the second to W. A. Woods* machine.—— 
Amongst the passengers by the M. M. S. Sydney, which arrived from 
Marseilles during the month, were eight Sisters of the Poor — a Roman 
Catholic Order new to Australia, but well known in England. They 
were me f at Port Melbourne by several Catholic dignitaries and escorted 
to the Home prepared for them on Victoria Parade, Melbourne.-^— A 
Trades Union organization, designed to interfere largely in politics, has 
just been organized in Victoria. ■ " ■The Bank of i\ew South Wales has 
declared a dividend at the rate of 15 per cent., and a bonus of 2i per cent.; 
S 30,000 were also placed to the credit of the reserve fund. The principal 
question to be submitted to the New South Wales Parliament during the 
coming year, will be the reorganization of the Municipal Government 
system.— Quite a number of the heroic six hundred who constituted the 
Light Brigade in its famous charge at Balaklava, are now residents of the 
Colonies, and they have commenced an annual celebration of the charge. 
The Geographical Society of Australia has organized a scientific ex- 
ploration to New Guinea.— -Sir Heury Parkes has resigned his seat in 
the Legislature of New South Wales. In taking leave of political life 
he remarked that in the present Parliament political character had almost 
entirely disappeared from the proceedings, and personal objects, to put 
the matter in the mildest form, have, to a large extent, absorbed tbat kind 
of consideration which has taken the place of deliberation and legitimate 
debate. He had lately seen immense sums of public money voted away 
by private pressure and bargaining, and in face of the openly avowed 
convictions of members who so pliantly yielded up their consciences. 
Even if he had the strength and disposition for this kind of Parliament- 
ary warfare, Sir Henry Parkes says he is not prepared to waste the rem- 
nant of life which remains to him in contending against such forces. 
——Farm laborers and domestic servants ^.re in demand in New South 
Wales, and receive good wages.— —-Brisbane, Queensland, has enjoyed a 
850,000 fire. ^— The first pile of the new municipal wharves. South Bris- 
bane, has been driven, with imposing ceremonies. The contract price is 
SOO.OOO.^— Fanny Smith, the last of the Tasmanian aboriginies, is to be 
pensioned by the Government. She has children and grandchildren, but 
they are half-castes. ^— One of the grand stands on the Christchurch, 
New Zealand, race course has been destroyed by fire. —— Western Aus- 
tralia has had quite a successful horticultural show.— Reaping has com- 
menced in South Australia. The crop is said to be turning out well.— — 
The Home Government has asked the Colonies to contribute S150.000, 
instead of the proposed §75,000, per annum toward the expenses of the 
New Guinea protectorate.— The city of Melbourne has enjoyed the lux- 
ury of a fearful thunder and rain storm. Several buildings were struck 
by lightning, and much property injured by water. ^— Four vessels have 
been wrecked at the South Sea Islands. ^— The recovery of a special de- 
posit of about 8307,325 in the defunct Oriental Bank, to the credit of the 
Colony of New South Wales, has been the occasion of some curious litiga- 
tion in Sydney.— —An English eleven of cricketers are making a tour of the 
Colonies. -^The Silverton Mines, New South Wales, are turning out well. 
An extensive fall of rain has permanently relieved the drought which was 
threatening them. ^— A council of the Prelates of the Roman 
Catholic Church of Australasia has been called by Archbishop 
Moran, in hiB capacity of Papal Delegate. It is to assemble 
in Sydney, in next September, and will be a very important gathering. 
—Harvesting and shearing i3 in progress in New South Wales.— — 
Gold has been discovered nearTemora. New South Wales, and a "rush" 
is now drifting in that direction. ^— A new Education bill, just passed 
by the Queensland Parliament, tolerates religious instruction in the pub- 
lic schools, if the churches provide for the instructing. ■■■ Harvesting 
operations are in progress in Queensland and the outlook is favorable. 



—Tasmania has remodeled its Constitution.— —The National Insur- 
ance Company, of New Zealand, has declared an interim dividend at the 
rate of twenty per cent, per annum. Major Jack is small, but he seems to 
know what he is doing.— —Assisted immigration to Tasmania has been 
Btopped.— The New Zealand Parliament has been prorogued.^— The 
Baptists of Victoria are making an effort to establish a college in con- 
nection with their denomination. An anonymous donor has promised 
S125.000 if an equal amount can be raised.— The western districts of 
Queensland are suffering very much from drought. -^— The railroad rev- 
enues of Victoria are increasing rapidly.^— There is a lock-out in the 
boot trade in Melbourne. Fifteen hundred men are out of employment 
through it. ^— Sir. H. F. Mitchell, President of the Legislative Council of 
Victoria, is dead. ^— A fine seam of coal has been struck, by the diamond 
drill, near Illawarra, New South Wales, at a depth of 847 feet.— ■— A Board 
appointed to investigate the matter, has reported adversely to the paving 
of the streets of Sydney with wooden blocks. The use of that material 
will, therefore, be abandon ed.^^The construction of the Fingal Railroad, 
Tasmania, is about to be commenced.— Mr. McBain has been elected 
President of the Legislative Council of Victoria.^— Chief Justice Sta- 
well, of the Supreme Court of Victoria, has been granted twelve months' 
leave of absence.— The Australian Frozen Meat Company lost 830,000 
during the past six months. Cause, a gouging freight contract with the 
Oriental Steamship Company. 

The acoustic properties and seating capacity of the Metropolitan 
Hall, Fifth street, near Market, are greater and better than those of any 
other place of public meeting on the Pacific Coast, if not in the United 
States. It can seat a great audience, every one of whom can hear. 



E. Ameden, late of San Francisco, now of Yokohama, Japan, exports 
(skillfully packed} all classes of goodB, from the rarest Curios and Works 
of Art to the more moderate grades, and invites correspondence. No. 18 
Yokohama, under Windsor Hotel. 



The new Photograph Gallery of Williams & Norton, 914 Market 
street, bet. Powell and Stockton, use only the San Francisco Dry Plate. 



GEO. STREET, Agent News Letter, 30 Cornhill, E. C., London. 

LIEBIgT COMPANY 7 ^ 

EXTRACT 

OF MEAT. 

Annual Sale, 

8,000,000 Jars. 




Finest and Cheapest 
Meat-Flavoring Stock 
for Soups, Made Dishes 
and Sauces. 

CAUTION.— Genuine ONLY with the fac simile of BARON LIEBIG'S Signature in 
Blue Ink across Label. The title " BARON LIEB1G *' and his photograph having 
been lately largely used by dealers having no connection with BARON LIEBIG, the 
public are hereby informed that the LIEBIG COMPANY are the only manufacturers 
who are able to offer the article with BARON LIEBIG'S guarantee of genuineness. 

An invaluable and palatable tonic iu all eases of weak digestion and debility. 

" Is a success and a boon for which Nations should feel grateful." — See Medical 
Press, Lancet, British Medical Journal, etc. 

To be had of all Storekeepers. Grocers and Chemists. Sole Agents for the United 
States (wholesale only), C. 1>AVI1> & CO., 9 Fenchurch Avenue, London, England. 

Sold Wholesale by RIOHAEDS & HARRISON, San Francisco. 

Thomas price's 

Assay Office and Chemical Laboratory, 

524 Sacramento Street, San Francisco. 

Careful Analyses made of Ores, Metals, Soils, Waters, Industrial Products, Foods, 
Medicines and Poisons. 
Consultations on Chemical, Mining and Metallurgical Questions. 

CJECJJ&GE8. 

ANALYSES. 
Qualitative Analysis of Ores.JiOto $25 00 
( t )a:intitative " " 15to 50 00 

Qualitative Analysis of Water 25 00 

" 75 00 

Guano 25 00 

Proximate Analysis of Coal 10 00 

Quautitave " " 50 00 

Complete Analysis, Qualitative and. 
Quantiiative, of Complex Sub- 
stances, at Special Rates. 



I 00 



ASSAYS. 

Gold and Silver 

Gold, Silver and Lead 5 00 

Gold, Sliver and Copper 5 00 _ 

Copper 3 OOJQuantitative 

Iron 3 00 

Tin 6 00 

Quicksilver 5 00 

Manganese 5 00 

Chromium 5 00 



A CARD. 

To Merchants, Storekeepers, Captains, etc. 

ISIDOR BRAUN. 

Broker in Pearls and Precious Stones, 

44 BATTON GARDEN, LONDON, 

ENGLAND. 

Kg- Consignments of PEARLS and EXECIOWS 

STONES will receive my BEST ATTENTION, and 

ACCOUNT SALES, with PROCEEDS, promptly 

remitted. May 3. 

COKE CHEAPEST FUEL. 

Redaction in Price : Wholesale Price, 50 cents per barrel ; 
Retail Price, 60 cents per barrel, at the works of the SAN FRANCISCO GAS- 
LIGHT COMPANY, Howard and First streets, and foot of Second St. Jan. 12. 

L. LANSZWEERT, " 

Analytical and Consulting; Cbemist, 
San Francisco, 



360 Fonrtb street, 

July 7- 



Jul 3, 1885. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



17 



NOTABILIA. 



A man want RtMofl In the tflnnaeotn River recently, nnd hooked a 
i pikr. II.' begin to piny him, whan the flab, running under 
It, jut in himself, ind, patting on the m i 
started tor N«'w t'rlvjtus. This shows the rfimger of k'"inu Behing in u 
Sut« where the whisky is rtrooger than the veracity of the Inhabitants, 

—Bur, Free Press. 

A Western editor, who was a little short of type, and also rather 
D ite.u, in whloh he tpokfl .>f an arrival at a hotel as " Mrs, 
Rawley, the Ing young widow from Platte v tile, ami her brother, Col. 
" book." And then he advised them to keep traveling until they 
struck the comer «»f Geary nod Lhipont streets, San Francisco, where 
Bradley ft Rulofeoo will photograph them in a stylo which cannot be 
equaled. 

" What do you expect Santa Clans to bring you down the chimney 
next Christmas? " asked old Mrs. Docking of her little grandchild 
Tommy, "Grandmother, I am surprised that a person of your age should 
still believe in such childish things," was thfl reply of the little fellow, 
who will be rive years old on his next birthday. —Texas Si/tings. 

Fat Man (who is in something of a hurry)—" I'll give you five dollars 
to get me t<> the station iu three minutes." Cabman (with provoking 
slowness) —" Well, sorr, you might corrupt me, hut you oan't bribe that 
And then the fat man went off to Swain's, No. 213 Sutter 
street, where delicious lunches, ice-creams, mince, squash and other pies, 
etc., can always be obtained. 

"Thank yon, sir," said the polite stranger, as he picked himself up 
from the sidewalk, whither he had been thrown by tripping over Slim- 
boy's cane ; " thank you; now I know what you carry that thing for, and 
why ynu c irry it in that way. Thank you, sir ; my curiosity is gratified 
■ithts't." —Boston Transcript. 

A young man in this city cannot quite make out whether his girl was 
Baroastic or not in her remark to him, after he had quite proudly declared 
that there was " noble blood" in his veins, that only the night before her 
father had said the same thing about his Guernsey cow.— Boston Times. 

They were young and extremely verdant, but they were on their 
bridal trip, and for the first time in their lives were taking a horse-car 
ride. When the conductor said, " Your fare, miss," she sweetly replied, 
" I know it, but I'm married now, and my husband buys those pure and 
unadulterated liquors, sold by P. J. Caasin & Co., corner of Washington 
and Battery streets." 

"Say, missus, d'ye want yer sidewalk cleaned?" "No, bubby, I 
guess not." "Waal, I guess yer better." "Why?" '"Cause if yer 
don't I'll slip down on' it an* break my leg, an' sue yer husband for ten 
thousand dollars. I guess you better have it cleaned." —Chicago News. 

Some one has found a petrified village in Nebraska. The prairie dogs 
stand petrified in front of petrified huts, while various other petrified ani- 
mals give the community a solid character that is rarely met with in 
these degenerate days. —N. Y. Tribune. 

A Western paper tells of a circus press agent who had his jaw broken 
by a kick from a mule. This shows at once that he was not qualified for 
his position, and the intelligent mule probably knew it ; just as all intelli- 
gent mules know that the Imperishable Paint, sold by J. R. Kelly & Co., 
Market street, goes three times as far as other paints, and is impervious 
to sun or rain. 

"What's the difference between a stock exchange and a bucket 
shop j " '* I'll explain it to you: When a fellow wins he says, ' I've made 
money on the stock exchange ; ' when he loses he remarks, ' I've been rob- 
bed in a bucket shop.' That's the difference." —French Paper. 

The "Jumping bean'* is a curiosity in Mexico. The jumping bean is 
no curiosity in Boston ; but it doesn't jump until it has been eaten in im- 
moderate quantities by people who don't seem to know that those stylish 
and well-made Hats, sold by White, No. 614 Commercial street, San 
Francisco, are superior to anything to be found in the United States. 

« There is the new moon," said Clara ; " how crooked it iB." " Yes, 
said George, "awfully crooked; but," he added, rapturously, "you wait 
until Cleveland is inaugurated ; that moon'll be Btraightened out like an 
ebony ruler inside of three weeks." — Bur. Hawkeye. 

Health i3 impossible when the blood is impure, thick and sluggish, or 
when it is thin and impoverished. Under such conditions, boils, pimples, 
headaches, neuralgia, rheumatism, and one disease after another is de- 
veloped. Take Ayer's Sarsaparilla, and it will make the blood pure, rich, 
warm and vitalizing. 

A rooster is alleged to have been found in Georgia, which, in the ab- 
sence of a hen having a nest of eggs in process of incubation, set on the 
nest until the original janitor returned. This is certainly a rare eggs-otic, 
and ought to be on exhibition. — Yonkers Gazette. 

Gin fiz is no longer the fashionable tipple for Eastern dudes. A new 
candidate called "ice-goat" is the correct thing now, and is composed of 
goats' milk, gin and sugar, flavored with cinnamon. It is said that one's 
breath, after drinking the mixture, will stop a clock. — Peck's Sun. 

Ayer's Cherry Pectoral is recommended by physicians of the great- 
est eminence on both sides of the Atlantic, as the most reliable remedy 
for colds and coughs, and all pulmonary disorders. It affords prompt re- 
lief in every case. No family should ever be without it. 

11 Don't talk to me about Wagner. I was an intimate friend of Ros- 
sini, and I admire his music above all other operas," "I think William 
Tell his best work." ""Do you know his Barber?" "No; I always 
shave myself." — Le Figaro. 

J. P. Cutter's Old Bourbon. — This celebrated Whisky is for sale by 
all first-class druggists and grocers. Trade mark— star within a shield. 

" How Is your old friend Jones petting along ? " " He has been coin- 
ing money up to last Wednesday." "Why did he stop, then?" "He 
was arrested." "What for?" "Coining money." — Drake's Magazine. 

Best Pictures taken at the Imperial Gallery, 724£ Market St., S. F. 



REAL ESTATE TRANSACTIONS. 

Becorded la the City and County of San Francisco. California, for 
the Week ending December 30, 1684. 

Compile ifromthe Records of the Commercial Aae ncy, 401 California XL, s. F. 



Tuesday. December 23rd. 



GRANTOR AND GRANTEE. 



_L 



[lEnntinioN. 



U Fay lo C Lore 

I. ia\ rim to P J Malum 

Hib Sv & L So to Ellen Sweeney.. 
Mary Hartley et al to J Kelso . . . 
II A Blake et alto J Selaoder. . . . 
O F Von Rhein to W H Miner... 

AC Erk sen to G D Morse 

Jno Pattisoo to M Hainque 

G O Davis to W H McDonald 

J Whltely et al to H Schmieden.. . I 



8 8710, 171 w Church, w 21x105, being 
II, II A '.II 

N,' /in-, 'j.T7:i; Be Bryant, u 20x75, be- 

in;: In 1> l'. vara 108 

i: Leavenworth, 91:6 s Pacitlc.s 23 x 

187:6— S0:n»890 

Sw Solano and Byranl avenue, s 75 

x 100 

N Tvler, 129:11 e 1st avenue, e 25i 137:0 

— W A7S0 

S California, 171:100 Lagntia, e 21:4 

187:6-W a 1117 ... 

N Post, 181:3 w Dcvisadero, w 29x67:6 

— W A 501 

s Ridley, 2:7 w Guerrero, w 25x90, be- 
Ing in M B25 

N Ellis, 112:6 c Jones, e 25x137:0, being 
iu 50- vara 1051 

Se Post and Leavenworth, e 187:6x187:6 



PRICK 



5 

1,850 

1 

582 

650 

10 

1,100 

1.750 

5,000 



Wednesday, December 24th. 



J E Plutt to MA Plate |E Guerrero, 58:0 n ISlli e 110, n 100, ei 

50:0. n 10, w 1)0:9, n 9, w 90:9, a 125 



Savs & Ln Soc to J Condon. 

J Ellison to C Spencer 

Jane Collie to W H Collie... 



to beg 
Se Perry, 205 ew4lh, sw 25x80, being 

in 100-vora 178 

E Sheridan and 10th, se 00x80, bciog in 

MBloekl 

jS Post, 51 e Broderick, c 83:0x125. be- 
ing in W A 505 

F A Will to Annie M Will S California, 119:9 e Franklin, e 22 x 

| 100-WA71 



$4 ,900 
2,250 



5 

1 

Gift 



Friday, December 26th. 



A Borelto L Felvey... 

Eliza Crane to Jno Crane ... 
L Helbing to D McMillan ... 

W Laidlaw to J Hendy 

V B Masson to Louise C Raconillat! 



D Fraser to Juiie Gascon 

Margt Byron to J W Keyston et al , 



J Hoalster to A Reusche 

Cath Bardeuwerper to Ellen Irwin 

J W Haggerty to J M Mooney 

CGoodall to R H Swayne 

F Bergson to Luigi Bini 



EFolsom, 25U s25lh.s 19:6x112:0, be 

ing in M B180 

E Stevenson, 100 n 19th, n 25x80, being 

in M B 

Sw nayward, 74 se Harrison, se 25x80, 

— 100-vara 275 

E Maple, 185 n 14th, n 50x130, beiug in 

M B25 

Ne 1st, 206:3 se Harrison, s 09:9xlt7:6 

— 50-vara 72S 

Se Bush and Hyde, e 30x87:0 

Se Shotwell and llllh, e 20x60, being in 

M B57 

N Pine, 192:6 w Dcvisadero, w 27:6 x 

127:6-\V A 501 

N Post. 110 w Broderick, w 27:6x137:5 

— W A501 

N Elizabeth, 228:4 e Diamond, e 51:8 

1228 

S Hayes 70 e Buchanan, e 67:6x120, be- 
ing in W A 221 

E Collingwood, 125 s .8th, s 24x125, be 

ing in U A 196 



$1,900 

500 

2,500 

1,500 

5,000 
4,900 

765 

5 

1 

800 

7,400 

775 



Saturday, December 27th. 



W Wolf to T Cain S Grove, 50 e Oelavin, c 24:6x80, being 

iu W A149 

N California, 192:0 w Buchanan, w 27:0 
X 132:G-VV A271 

N Oak, 75 e Scott, e 25x100, being in W 
Addition 437 

S Jackson, 150 e Baker, e 25x127:8, be- 
ing in W A 544 

W Buchanan, 25:6 s Jackson, s 25:6x80 
-W A268 

S Vallejo, 97:9 e Jones, e 19:9x68:5, be- 
ing in 50-vara 850 



W W Gollin to R Gonzales 

M McCracken to C R Hawthore. 

W FLewisto M W Bell 

W F Allen to DP Marshall 

L M Walsh to E M Thompson . . . 



$2,800 
7,500 
1,100 
3,300 
2,500 
1.500 



Monday, December 29th. 



J B Lcfevre to W H Coghlll 
Cath Welsh to D Center... 



W Easton to Carrie Easton 

Hib Sv & Ln Soc to P Arata et al, 

Jas Lick to A Boyd 

M Hencken to Susan Toher 



S Clay. 179:2 w Tuylor, w 25x120 

W Alabama, 182 s 20th, a 52x100, being 

in M B142 

Ne Gough and Ellis, n 60x103:1, being 

in W A 132 

E Mason. 75 s Lombard, s 25x80, being 

in 50-vara 616 

Se Washington and Sansome, s 122x90: 

3— B & W Lots 133 and 134 

Se Minna. 400 sw 7tb, sw 25xS5 



* 5 

900 

Gift 

1,800 

1 0000 
2,700 



Tuesday, December 30th. 



C L Hinkel to Amaria Pierce 

Sav & Ln Soc to J N E rVilson . . . 



Geo Edwards to Jane R Forbes. . 

P Burke to Kate Balazarini 

C C Chapman et al to M S Fisber. . 

L P Gaotier to C W Carpenter 

L J Hirtb to O F Von Rhein 

Helen Sinclair et al to J Stromberg 
F E Eaton to J Goetgen 



E Dcvisadero. 49 s Haight, s 24x123 be- 
ing in W A 442 

E Van Ness avenue, 92:0 s Broadway, 
s 35, e 123, n 127:6, w 23, 8 92:6, w 100 
to beginning, being in Western Ad- 
dition 49: and beginning 100 e Van 
Ness, and 127:6 s Broadway, e 23 x s 
10-W A49 

W Scott, 59 s Bush, s 25x87:6, being in 
W A458 

E Hardy, 286 n 17th, n 25x75, being in 
M B95 

Lot 6, block 10, being in Junction 
Homestead 

Block 43, being in tbo Excelsior Home- 
stead 

Nw Pacific and Baker, w 50x132:4, be- 
ing in W A 575 

N Pacific, 91:6 w Hyde, w 23x87:6, be- 
ing in 50-vara 1306 

E Hyde, 114:6 n Jackson, n 23x120, be- 
iog in 50-vara 1285 



$5,000 



7,500 

3,800 

1,600 

5 

925 

10 

1,100 

2,400 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO ■ NEWS LETTER. AND 



Jan. 3, 1885. 



SCIENTIFIC AND USEFUL. 



Progress of Cremation. — Cremation is making way, even in Scandi- 
navia. The Swedes have long favored cremation, but hitherto their ef- 
forts to obtain from their authorities the sanction for building a crema- 
torium at Stockholm have been unsuccessful. At the last meeting of the 
Swedish Cremation Society, however, the President, Lieutenant-General 
Klingenstierna, announced that arrangements had been made with the 
Stockholm authorities for erecting a crematorium in one of the suburbs. 
The place chosen is a high, rocky plain to the north of the city, where a 
wide view is obtained of the surroundings. A. large plot of ground round 
the crematorium is to be laid out as a public park, at the expense of the 
town. It is hardly likely to be a popular promenade when a cremation is 
in progress. 

The Effect of Frost.— In a latitude where the heavy frosts of Octo- 
ber nip the leaves of the forest trees, it is not wise to trust to Fall pas- 
ture, of which clover is a large part. The feeding value of all green 
grass and fodders declines when the mercury drops below 32 degrees. 
Frost-bitten grass, clover, or pumpkins, make sorry substitutes for nutri- 
tious food. But as farmers generally trust to grazing ontil the snow falls, 
there is a heavy shrinkage in stock to arrive within thirty days after the 
first hard freeze. Grain, hay, or corn fodder, must supplement the pas- 
ture. Where one has stock on clover pasture, that is to be kept another 
year, let it be remembered, too, that tramping frosted or frozen clover is 
death to it. Its feeding value then is small, and the damage to the future 
crop is immense. 

Saccharine Food.— The London Lancet suggests that the British agri- 
culturists might make more use of sugar for feeding and fattening cattle. 
Owing to the glut in the market, the coarser sorts can be obtained at an 
exceptionally cheap rate, refuse molasses being quoted at lc. per pound, 
and jaggery at very little more. At these rates, therefore, the farmer 
could well afford to treat his beasts more liberally with saccharine addi- 
tions to the usual food. It has been ascertained that the sugar exercises 
a beneficial effect upon cowb in regard to both flavor and the quantity of 
their milk. It also improves pigs, and sheep thrive upon it when it is 
mixed with the ordinary provender. All animals are partial to it, and in 
the case of horses, sleekness of skin is thought to be produced by a saccha- 
rine dietary. 

Temperature of Fruit.— Maintain an even temperature in the fruit- 
room near the freezing point, for which purpose two thermometers will 
be useful. Apples will not freeze if the thermometer goes to 28% or four 
degrees below freezing, but some sorts, or those of dry texture and rich 
flavor, will be least affected by the cold. If kept constantly at 32", vary- 
ing not more than one or two degrees either way from this point, they 
will remain sound a year. There are various contrivances for holding 
the fruit, as open shelves, tight barrels, etc., but the best, most compact, 
and most easily managed, are flat, shallow boxes, piled one above an- 
other. — Country Gentleman. 

Cleansing Agents. —Turpentine, iu small quantities, may be used in 
boiling white goods to great advantage, as it improves the color, and the 
boiling drives off all odor. Resin, in soap, is quite another thing; it in- 
jures and discolors some goods and shrinks woolens. Soapmen argue 
that, on account of the turpentine in the resin, it assists in washing. It 
is used for a filler and to make the soap bard and cheap. It is a fraud on 
the consumer. 

American Cattle. — Over seventy -five per cent of the cattle of the 
United States are reported to be what are termed "scrubs." There is 
plenty of room, therefore, for the dissemination of pure breeds. The 
value is in improved stock with which to breed grades. But the average 
farmer need not nee ^ssirily invest in a bull of such blue blood that his 
pedigree carries his value into the thousands of dollars in price. 

A New Use for Plaster.— Keep some land plaster on hand to sprinkle 
over the manure heaps and in the stables every day. Nitrogen is expens- 
ive; it is what you need, and you cannot afford to lose it. When you 
smell ammonia it is wasting through the air. The sulphuric acid in the 
plaster will catch and hold it for you and deliver it to your growing 
crops in such a form that they can take it up and digest it. 

A Curious Calculation. — A recent calculation shows that a man 
weighing 160 pounds, and running a mile in six minutes, performs work 
about equal to that of a half- horse engine, while a walker sustaining five 
miles an hour for a long time does work equal to that of a quarter-horse 
engine, and consumes only one-twentieth of the weight of food or fuel. 

Ancient Magnetism.— The use of the magnet for the cure of disease 
was known to the ancients. It was knowu to Atftius, who lived as early 
as the year 500. He says : " We are assured that those who are troubled 
with the gout in their hands or feet, or with convulsions, find relief when 
they hold a magnet." 

The Velocity of a Shot. — The highest velocity that has been imparted 
to shot is given as 1,026 feet per second, being equal to a mile in 2.3 
seconds. _________ 

"The Part of Jesus and the Apostles," a French publication, 
from the pen of Dr. I. M. Rabbinowicz, has just been translated into 
English by Philip Zadig, and issued from the presses of Francis, Valen- 
tine & Co. It is an interesting discussion of an exceedingly attractive 
subject. J. B. Golly & Co. are agents for it. 

Tennent's " Nautical Almanac" is recognized by all sea-faring men 
as a standard publication of the utmost reliability. The edition for 1885 
has just been issued, and is a marine digest which no officer trading on 
the Pacific Coast should be without. 



AN INTELLIGENT DOG. 
The marvelous stories of intelligent dogs and cats which every 
lover of our humble relations can tell on occasion sometimes suggest the 
alarming thought of what would happen if these intelligent creatures 
could club their intelligence and use it collectively in self-defense M. 
Meunier, for instance, in a recent number of the Rappel. describes how 
a small female terrier, distressed at seeing the furious efforts of a male 
friend — a fat spaniel — to escape from the table leg in a Freoch restaurant, 
to which he was tied, gnawed the cord in two, and effected his liberation 
amid much mutual rejoicing. The process of being tied up and being 
set free by gnawing was several times repeated, evidently to the great 
amusement of the dog's master, from whose point of view— classing him 
with the general masters of dogs — the occurrence was certainly very en- 
joyable. But what if the fact that cords can be gnawed should be com- 
municated to other chained and corded quadrupeds 9 How long would 
any dog remain fast ? 



Japan.— The City of Neio York carries hence 812 bbls. Flour, 28 rolls 
Leather, and 2,000 lbs. Sugar, etc. 

Take the Haight-atreet or McAllister-street cable cars to Park with- 
out transfer. 



Williams & Norton, new Photograph Gallery, 914 Market street, be- 
tween Powell and Stockton, use the San Francisco Dry Plate exclusively. 

OFFICES TO LET 

— m the — 

FIREMAN'S FUND INSURANCE COMPANY'S BUILDING, 

Corner California and Sansome Streets. 

Sunny Suites and Siugle Rooms, all new and conveuiently arranged, and having 
Electric Bells and Speaking Tubes from lower hall. 

FIRST-CLASS ELEVATOR IN BUILDING. 

gggPThe Most Eligible Location in the City for Corporations or Professional Men. 

PACIFIC MAIL STEAMSHIP COMPANY. 

The Company's Steamers will sail for Hongkong:, via 
YOKOHAMA: 

CITY OF PEKING JANUARY 10th 

CITY OF RIO DE JANEIRO FEBRUARY nth 

At 2 o'clock p. M. 
Excursion Tickets to Yokohama and return at reduced rates. 
For New York, via Panama: 

SAN BLAS JANUARY 15th 

At 10 o'clock a. M. 
Taking freight and passengers for MAZATLAN, 3AN BLAS, MANZANILLO, AC- 
APULCO, SAN JOSE DE GUATEMALA and LA LIBERTAD, and via ACA- 
PULCO for other Mexican and Central American ports. 

For Auckland and Sydney, Calling at Honolulu: 

CITY OF SYDNEY JANUARY 17th, at 2 o'clock r. M., 

Or Immediately ou arrival of the English mails. 
Ten Dollars additional is charged for Upper Cabin passage. 
For freight or passage apply at the office, cor. First and Brannan streets. 
[Jan. 3.j WILLIAMS, DIMOND & CO., General Agents. 

OCCIDENTAL AND ORIENTAL STEAMSHIP CO. 

FOB JAPAN AND CHINA.— Steamers Leave Wharf Corner 
FIRST AND BRANNAN STREETS at 2 o'clock p. «., for YOKOHAMA 
AND HONGKONG, connecting at Yokohama with Steamers for SHANGHAI : 

Steamer. ^1884.^ From San Francisco. 

SAN PABLO THURSDAY, DECEMBER 18th 

^18SB.-^ 

OCEANIC THURSDAY, JANUARY 22d 

ARABIC TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 3d 

SAN PABLO TUESDAY, MARCH 10th 

OCEANIC THURSDAY, APRIL 10th 

ARABIC TUESDAY, APRIL 28tb 

SAN PABLO TUESDAY, JUNE 2(1 

OCEANIC THURSDAY, JULY 9th 

Excursion Tickets to Yokohama and Return at Reduced Rates. 

Cabin Plans on exhibition and Passenger Tickets for Bale at C. P. R. R. Co.'s 
General Office, Room 7-4, cor. Fourth and Tovvuseml sis. 

For Freight, apply to GEORGE H. RICE, Freight Agent, at the Pacific MailSteam- 
ship Company's Wharf, or at No. 202 Market street, Union Block. 

T. H. GOODMAN, General Passenger Agent. 

LELAND STANFORD, President. 

PACIFIC COAST STEAMSHIP COMPANY. 

Steamers ol" this Company will sail from Broadway Whnrf 
as follows : 

For Victoria, B. C.and Pu^et Sound Pons: 10 A. m., OCT. Cth, 14th, 2__, 30th, 
and NOV, 7th, and every eighth day thereafter. The last steamer of the month 
connects at Port Townsend with steamer "Idaho" for Alas*ca. 

For Portland, Oregon, iu connection with the O. R. and N. Co.: Every five days. 

For Santa Cruz, Monterey, San Simeon, Cayucos, Port Harford, San Luis Ohispo, 
Gaviota, Santa Barbara, Ventura, Hueneme, San Pedro, Los Angeles and Sau Diego: 
About every Becond day, excepting San Diego, every fifth clay a. m. 

For Eureka, Areata, and Hookton, Humboldt Bay: Every Wednesday, at 9 o'clock. 

For Point Arena, Mendocino, etc.: Every Monday, at 3 p. m. 

Ticket Office, No. 214 Montgomery Street, near Pine. 

GOODALL, PERKINS & CO., General Agents, 
[Oct. 4.] No. 10 Market street. 

OCEANIC STEAMSHIP COMPANY. 

FOB HONOLULU.— The splendid new SOOO-ton Steamships 
will leave the Company's wharf, corner of Steuart and Harnson streets: 

MARIPOSA FRIDAY, JANUARY '-M 

ALAMEDA THURSDAY, JANUARY 15tta 

AT ! P. It 
The ALAMEDA is now receiving freight. EXCURSION TICKETS at Reduced 
Rates. For further particulars applv to 

J.'D. SPRECKELS & EROS., Agents, 
(Dec. 27.] 327 Market street. 



Jan. S, 1885. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



19 



SUNBEAMS. 



Little prattler to elderly visitor— " Mamma says baby has got my 
none. What does she mean, Mrs. Gummer?" Elderly Visitor— " She 
means that baby's nose is like yours." Little Prattler— "Then baby's 
got your mouth, basn t she ? 'Cos she hasn't got any teeth in it." 

— Boston Transcript. 

Young Richling- " Let me get you some champagne?" Miss 
Dti umme — " No, thanks." Y. H-— '* Po you not like it, Miss Dhumme?" 
Mi--.. I>. —"Oh, yes ; but then, it has such ao effect upon me." Y. K. 
(■articling to say something pleasant)— "Ah! makes you — ah— bright— " 

—Life. 

Policeman — " Have you a permit to play here?" Organ Grinder — 
" Nn, but it amuses the little ones so much." Policeman — "Then you 
will have the goodness to accompany me." " Very well, sir ; what do 
you wish to sing ?" — Fliegende Blatter. 

"Von mast come and see me, my dear," said a lady to a little girl of 
her acquaintance. " Do you know my number?" " Oh, yee," responded 
the innocent child. " Papa says you always live at sixes and sevens." 

— Detroit Free Press. 

" If yon don't keep out of this yard you'll catch it," said a woman to 
a boy in West Lynn. "All right," answered the gamin ; "I wouldn't 
have come in if I'd known your folks had it." — Lynn Item. 

"Hear those men! How loud they are talking! They'll come to 
blows next. Wonder what they're wrangling about?" "I'm sure I 
don't know whether it is politics or religion." — Boston Transcript. 

An unsuccessful Nassau street lawyer got his first case last week. It 
was a metallic case, and he got something to suit him on the first trial. 

— N. 7. News. 

Little Dick— " Pa, what race do we belong to— civilized or half civil- 
ized?" Pa — "Well, we are civilized, but our next door neighbors are 
only half civilized." — Phil. Call. 

A Colorado man, speaking of the wind blowing, says: " When a man 
loses his hat in one town he telegraphs to the next town to some fellow 
to stop it." — Anon. 

It Is to be hoped that the architect of the Washington Monument has 
not forgotten to paint " Post no bills " on that imposing structure. 

— Courier- Journal. 

When a girl is a baby small caps are all that she requires, but when 
she becomes a young lady her headgear requires a larger capital. 

— Yonkers Statesman. 

" The peerless St. John " is what the Democrats call him, as they 
drink to his health." — Bartford Post. They mean the beer-less St. John. 

— Phil. Call. 

A Tombstone, A.T., reporter said of the troupe at the Opera House: 
" Last night's performance will be repeated to-night, with an entire change 
ot programme. — Ex. 

"A Chinese doctor at Victoria is said to lose very few patients. " It 
is suspected that the almond-eyed fraud never gives any medicine. 

— Philadelphia Call. 

A motion to throw an inkstand is always overruled by the Judge and 
objected to by the opposing counsel. — New Orleans Picayune. 

The Australians have invented a machine for producing rain-storms. 
Milk ought never to go above 5 cents a quart there. — Bur. Free Press. 

The office-holder warbles: " I would not live always ; I ask not to 
stay, but I'll misB, oh I'll miss that magnificent pay." — Hatchet. 

A thoronghbred Boston girl never calls it a " crazy quilt." She al- 
ways speaks of it as " a non compos mentis covering." — N. Y. Jour. 

Treasure for China. — The steamship City of New York, hence Dec. 
31, carried the following treasure: 

Bank of California, 223 bars silver bullion §298,709,33 

Bank of California, Mexican dollars 20,520.00 

Comptoir d' Escompte de PariB, Mexican dollars 50,000.00 

Chinese, Mexican dollars 179,043.00 

Chinese, Gold Coin 10,115.00 

Chinese, Gold Dust 1,658.33 

Total §560,045.00 

Our London correspondent, of December 11th, has this to say of 
Quicksilver: 

1883. 1884. 

Imports, from Jan. 1 to Nov. 30 (bottles) about. . 54,070 58,566 

Exports, same period 45,832 46,882 

Imports for November 411 800 

Exports for November 6,070 4,334 

Price per bottle, about £5 7s. 6d. about £6 15s. 

Stock in London November 30, 1884, roughly calculated, is about 79,- 
000 bottles. 

The Sunset, the Sunrise, the Sunshade and the Sunshine brands of 
Tea are imported by Richards, Harrison & Sherwood raw, and are 
toasted in this country by that firm's new process. That the result is 
satisfactory, is amply evidenced by the fact that experienced housekeepers 
are using these brands exclusively. 

If you want seasonable Underwear and Gents' Furnishing Goods, in 
all the latest styles and at reasonable prices, go to J. W. Carmany's, 
No. 25 Kearny street. His stock is a most elaborate one. 

R. Cutlar (Dentist), Room 104, Phelan's Building, third floor. 



CALIFORNIA SUCAR REFINERY, 

OFFICE. 327 JIABKET N I BEE r III I I \ EH V, lo I It I It... 

c '.\rs BPRBCKELS Pn.id.nt 

J. D. SPRBCKELS Yke-(To«ldent 

A. B. SPHECKELS Secretary 

WM. T. COLEMAN A CO., 

SHIPPING AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS. 

Represented by: 

AGENCY OF AGENCY OF 

WM. T. COLEMAN & CO., WM. T. COLEMAN & CO., 

38 BTATEK STREET. Flavel's Warehouse, 

Chicago, Illinois. Astoria, Oregon. 

MR. EDOENE E. JONE, 

4 BISHOPSOATE STREET WITHIN, 
LONDON, E. C. 

Sam Francisco and Ne-w York. 

H. 1>. Williams. A. Cbeskbrouqh. \v h Dimo.vd 

WILLIAMS, DIM0ND & CO., 

SHIPPING AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS, 

UNION BUILDING JUNCTION MARKET AND PINE STREETS. 

Agents for Pacific Mail Steamship Company, Pacific Steam Navigation Company, 
The Cunard Royal Mail Steamship Company, "The California Line of Clippers," 
from New York and Boston, and " The Hawaiian Line." March 22. ' 

C. AD0LPHE LOW & CO., 

Commission Merchants, 
SAN FSANCI8CO and NEW YORK, 

8®" Agents of American Sugar Refinery, corner of Union and Battery streets, 
San FranciBco, California. Jan. 17. 

H. M. NEWHALL & CO., 

GENERAL SHIPPING AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS, 

NO. 309 SANSOME STREET, 

[Jan. 12.] SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA. 

STORAGE. 

FURNITURE, PIANOS, TRUNKS, PAINTINGS, MIRRORS, CARPETS. ORNA- 
MENTS and other Goods Received for STORAGE and SAFE KEEPING. 
Goods Stored in Clean, Light, Dry Lofts. Charges moderate. ADVANCES made. 

INSURANCE EFFECTED. 

CALIFORNIA STORAGE -WAREHOUSE, 

7Ui Mission street Next to Grand Opera House 

THOMAS H. ROONEY & CO. 

SAVAGE, SON & CO., 

EMPIRE FOUNDRY AND MACHINE WORKS 
Nos. 135 to 143 Fremont street, 

SAN FRANCISCO, 

Manufacturers of STEAM ENGINES, SAWMILL MACHINERY, CABLE-ROAD 

CASTINGS. QUARTZ-WORK and ARCHITECTURAL IRON GOODS. 

gg~ Estimates Free. August 2. 

DR. RICORD'S RESTORATIVE PILLS. 

Bay None bat the Genuine; a Specific for Exhausted Vital- 
ity, Physical Debility, Wasted Forces, etc. Approved by the Academy of 
Medicine, Paris, and by Medical Celebrities of the World. 

AGENTS for California and the Pacific States, J. G. STEELE & CO., 635 Market 
street (Palace Hotel), San Francisco. 
Sent by Mail or Express anywhere. 

Prices Reduced. 

Box of fifty, $1 25; of one hundred, $2 00; of two hundred, S3 50; of four 
hundred, $6 00. Preparatory Pills, $2 00. 
6®~ Send for Circular. Oct. 4. 

F. D ANERI & CO., 

— DEALERS IN — 

WINES, LIQUORS, GROCERIES, 
27 and 29 California Street, 

[Dec, 15.] Between Davis and Drumm, San Francisco. 

MISS M. E. BBLANGER, 

Dressmaking Parlors and Pattern Rooms, 

Central Block -Entrance 14 Dupont Street, San Francisco. 



ROOFS 

827 



SEND YOUR ORDERS EARLY FOR REPAIRS TO 

H- 6. FISKE, the Pioneer Roofer, 

Market street, Opposite Stockton. 



DANCING ACADEMY, 

1328 BUSH STREET. CORNER POLK, 

Prof. O. A. Liial respectfully announces tnat bis new Acad- 
emy, 1328 Bnsh street, is now open for Juvenile and Evening Classes. Office 
Hours, lor Terms, etc., 10 a. m. to 12 m., and 1 to 5 p. m. Feb. 9. 



20 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Jan. 3, 1885. 



COMMENTS ON FOREIGN AFFAIRS. 
William Ewart Gladstone, the present British Premier was born on 
thSTy oTDecember, 1809 and consequently he reached his seventy- 
fifth birthdav on last Tuesday. The occasion was made one of more 
than usual rejoicing, and the present seems to be an appropriate time to 
take TpasPin.' review of this great man's career. He was educated at 
Eton and Ovford. and graduated from the latter institution with high 
honored 1831 Throughout life be has always maintained the reputa- 
tion^ "eing a piofouud scholar and a man ol ! hfah literary quahtie. 
He entered public life as a member of Parliament in 1832 In 1831 ne 
was appointed, by Sir Kobert Peel, a Junibr Lord of. the Treasury, and 
Sol tea? time forth he may be said to have been active and coosp icuous 
in public affairs. In 1841 he was sworn in as a member of the Privy 
Council, and took the position of Vine Pr esident of *« Board of Trade 
and Master of the Mint. The revision of the British tariff of 1842 is al- 
most entirely his work. After holding several off ,ces »{|d ^neriencmg 
the usual vicissitudes of pub He life, he became Chancellor of the Ex- 
chequer aou in presenting his first budget ^ tbe House of Commons he 
d.liieredaseriesof addresses which were said, by Lord John Russell, 
"to contain the ablest expositions, of the true P™c.ples o 1 b nance «ve 
delivered by a British statesman." Subsequently, his brilliant manage 
ment of British finances challenged the admiration of Europe Mr Glad- 
stone became First Lord of the Treasury and Premier in 1868, and from 
that time forth he applied himself principally (during his various terms 
of office) to the execution of a domestic policy in accord with advanced 
Liberal thought. Among the measures for which he is resp lonsible .a. e 
the Disestablishment of the Irish Church, two orthree Irish Land Tenure 
Acts, the Abolition of Purchase in the Army, the Abolition of Confis- 
cation in English Penal Law, the Franco se Bill, etc.; he was also active, 
as a younger member, in giving assistance m many of the Liberal struggles. 

Mr Gladstone is not a fanatic ; he is a deep thinker, and a man of 
great conscientiousness. He commenced life as a Conservative^ and his 
journey from the party immovables has been by slow stages When Mr. 
Gladstone first entered public life, that era of liberal thought which 
marks the present day was just dawning, and he has kept pace, since 
then, with its development; indeed, he has very often led it. He differs 
from the radicals in that he believes in slower and surer methods. He 
has always acted upon the principle of allowing the altered conditions 
produced by one great change to adjust themselves and beBtudiedout 
before undertaking fresh innovations. He is a man of thought who can 
be convinced, and he has frequently supported measures which he farst 
opposed upon the ground of inexpediency. 

Bismarck's colonization scheme does not Beem to be resulting in any 
very brilliant Buccess, and it is unlikely to do so. As was pointed out in 
this column when the Prince of Blood and Iron inaugurated this policy, 
he has started in too late. He is several centuries behind the times, and 
cannot catch up. The English language and English institutions are al- 
ready planted all over the world, and there are few places really worth 
'• annexing " now left. Besides, it is a business which Bismarck does not 
understand. His forte is in tricking accomplished diplomats rather than 
building up colonies, and then he is hampered to a large extent by those 
German habits and governmental institutions which he wishes to 
transplant. They are no doubt very admirable and very suited to Rhine- 
land but they are scarcely elastic enough to be adapted to the require- 
ments of an undeveloped country. Fur these and many other reaeonB 
Bismarck will fail. Already there are well de6ned symptoms of trouble 
arisiu" out of his African ventures, and the end is not yet. He has en- 
cumbered himself with Jesponaibilities which will haraBS him without 
bringing commensurate profit. 

The indications of impending trouble in Europe are certainly most 
promising at the present time. There seems to be a perfect accord be- 
tween one or two of the larger powers to badger the British Government 
at all points, and there are certain matters in dispute now— notably the 
Egyptian financial question, in regard to which the attitude of Germany 
and France is intolerably unjust— which it is difficult to conceive of any 
pacific settlement of, unless the continental powers make a square back 
down. Then there seems to be a small speck of trouble brewing in the 
direction of India. It is now a pretty well defined fact that Russia has 
taken the utmost advantage of Lord Ripou^ unfortunate and careless ad- 
ministration, and that her old ambition to advance near, if not absolutely 
into, British India, is only restrained by a doubt as to whether the op- 
portunity is yet as appropriate as it may become. 

The expedition for the relief of Gordon and Khartoum has, as was in- 
timated last week, now reached a point where the Associated Press may 
be expected to get in its deadly work. So far nothing worse than dole- 
ful pictures and predictions of failure and destruction have been served 
out. But the A. P. has not lost its cunning or forgotten how to manu- 
facture " interesting news." The annihilation of Wolseley and hiB men 
may, therefore, be expected to begin at any moment, and be kept up, 
with religious exactness, three times a week, until Khartoum is relieved. 

The Franco-Chinese difficulty still remains in a condition of como. A 
report announcing the sinking of a French transport by a Chinese 
cruiser is about the only warlike development recorded during the past 
month or so— and that was promptly denied. The French Government, 
however, iB still industriously engaged in looking for transports ; and the 
Chinese Government is actively engaged in admiring its own superiority 
and virtue. 

Holders of stock in the San Francisco Gaslight Company should at- 
tend the ensuing annual meeting and vote their own stock. A scheme 
which will deeply injure the interests of the stockholders has been con- 
cocted, and its fructification will be attempted. The surest, if not the 
only, way to prevent this, is to attend in person, and not by proxy. 

Panama The Granada, hence, carried 1,000 bbls. Flour, 116,543 tt>B. 

Rice, 7,360 lbs. Tea, 540 lbs. Opium. 

Mexloo.— The Granada, hence Dec. 31st, carried 2,975 lbs. Cocoa, 75 
bbls. Flour, 9,300 lbs. Sugar, etc. 



WEDDING MISTAKES. 
We take the following from an amusing paper on " Wedding Mis- 
takes," in a contemporary: The most common mistake of the bride is to 
take off only one of her gloves, whereas both hands are brought into 
requisition in the service. As for the men, they commit all kinds of 
blunders and bunglings. I have known a man, at that very nervous and 
trying moment, follow a clergyman within the communion rails, and pre- 
pare to take a place opposite him. I have known a man, when a minister 
stretched out his hand to unite those of the couple, take it vigorously in 
his own and give it a hearty shake. Sometimes more serious difficulties 
occur Some ladies may have had an almost unconquerable reluctance 
to use the word "obey." One or two, if their own statements i are to be 
accepted, have ingeniously constructed the word nobey. The word, 
however, has still to be formally admitted into the language. There was 
one girl, who was being married by a very kindly old clergyman, who ab- 
solutely refused to utter the word "obey." The minister suggested that, 
if she were unwilling to utter the word aloud, Bhe should whisper it to 
him but the young lady refused to accept even this kind of a compro- 
mise Further, however, than this the clergyman refused to accom- 
modate her. But when he was forced to dismiss them all without pro- 
ceeding any further, the recalcitrant young person consented to " obey.' 
The difficulty, however, is not always made on the side of the ladies. 
On one occasion the bridegroom wiBhed to deliver a little oration quali- 
fying his vow, and describing in what sense and to what extent he was 
usin» the words of the formula. He was, of course, given to understand 
that nothing of this kind could be permitted. There, was one man who 
accompanied this formula with soto voce remarks, which must have been 
exceedingly disagreeable to the officiating minister. He interpolated re- 
marks after the faBhion of Burchell's " Fudge." " With this ring I thee 
wed. That's superstition." "With my body I thee worship., Ibats 
idolatry." " With all my worldly goods I thee endow. That s a lie. 
It is a wonder that such a being was not conducted out of church by a 
beadle. This puts one in mind of an anecdote that is told of a man, who, 
in his time, was a member of the British Cabinet. There was a great 
discussion on the question whether a man can marry on three hundred a 
year. " All I can say," said the great man, " is that when I said with 
all my worldly goods I thee endow,' so far from having £300, I question 
whether, when all my debts were paid, I had 300 pence." " Yes, my 
love," said his wife; "but then you had your splendid intellect. I 

did'nt endow you with that, ma'am," sharply retorted the honorable 

husband. 

THAT INFAMOUS CHARACTER AGAIN. 
It Is not long since we had occasion, in these columns, to refer to an 
exhibition of revolting senBuality on the part of a certain Federal official, 
whose headquarters are in the Government building on Sansome street, 
and whoBe name, out of consideration for his family, we did not mention, 
in connection with a young lady, then a guest at his house. At that 
time among his other rilthy practices we alluded to, was that of invit- 
ing young girls, many of a tender age, to visit with him a certain so- 
called restaurant on Dupont street, as well as other places of a similar 
character, which are really only houses of assignation, under an assumed 
name, and there practice his villainies and gratify his lusts on the per- 
son of these young creatures in a manner only paralleled by 'he in- 
famous character of those developed on the trial of the notorious Dol- 
liver a year or two ago in this city. Our calling attention to the mat- 
ter had the effect, for a time, of causing the gentleman (!) (suppose we 
call him Mr S.) to cease his vile and degrading practices, but from in- 
formation we have lately received, we are led to believe, he has 
again resumed them. Now, while the News Letter, as its read- 
ers are well aware, carefully abstains from publishing matter merely for 
the purpose of gratifying the taste of lovers of meretricious and 
sensational matter, it owes, none the less, a duty to the public to make 
known the character of those who, setting at dehance its rules, commit 
out-ages that escape punishment alone from the fact that the offender 
can only be reached, criminally, at the cost of much suffering and distress 
to the innocent. Certain disclosures made some time ago of the prac- 
tices of the party to which we have alluded, came to the knowledge of 
hiB wife and resulted in an attack of insanity, from which she has but 
lately recovered. To spare this unfortunate lady any more Buffering 
would induce us to avoid making any further alluBion to the matter, but, 
out of consideration to a number of young and thoughtless children who 
are now or may hereafter become, the victims of this wretch s licentious- 
ness we feel it to be our duty to say that, unless we have some immedi- 
ate assurance that he will discontinue his scoundrelly practices, we will 
make known his name and address, that the public at large may be on 

their guard againBt h im. 

AN IMPORTANT CHANGE. 
The German military authorities have resolved to introduce an im- 
portant change in the equipment of the cavalry. Henceforth carbines are 
to be carried slung across the back, instead of in a leather case over the 
right thigh, and. furthermore, all sabers are to be suspended from the 
saddle instead of being buckled to the waistband. The high-peaked Hun- 
garian saddle is to be discarded in favor of a lighter and more convenient 
one, somewhat resembling the English hunting pattern while the burden 
of both horse and man is to be very considerably lightened. For exam- 
ple, two spare horse-shoes, a fore and a hind one, will henceforth be taken 
into the field, instead of four, and the kit of the troopers is to be much 
reduced. The idea at the bottom of the reform is that all the cavalry 
must in future be trained more than ever to act as infantry, as may be in- 
ferred from the fact that the carbine, and not the saber, 18 the weapon 
that will remain inseparable f rom its owner. —Court Circular. 

Messrs. M. A. Gunst & Co., the well-known dealers in and manufac- 
turers of Cigars, Tobacco and Smoking Materials, have for sometime past 
been engaged in fitting up, in the most elegant sty e, as a branch, the old 
Examiner business office. The formal opening will take place this even- 
ing and will be well worth seeing. 

It 18 reported that M. de Lesseps has obtained a new concession from 
the Egyptian Government, under which he obtains the right for the cut- 
ting of a fresh-water canal from Zagazig to Port Said. 




C fcM *"Awci*e© 




i&ixlit ttmxWXbbzxtx sjer. 




Vol. 35. 



SAN FRANCISCO. SATURDAY, JAN. 10, 1885. 



Bo. 27. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



Another Case in Point 10 

Annual Statement of Well.-*, Fartro & 

i fty 14-16 

A Remarkable Machine. 16 

Attractive Church Music 3 

"Bli" 13 

Christmas Violets (poetry), 8 

Comments on Foreign Affairs. SO 

OoAof Producing Pig Iron 8 

Bx-Gov. Stanford for Senator. 1U 

Financial Keview 1 

QOtftp from New York '2 

liUucus and Psyche (poetry) 4-5 

Ha^a Letter.... is 

Men 1 Meet -The Venerable Masher... 2 
Harder on the High Seas 18 

Notabilia, 17 



Obituary 20 

Only (poetry) IS 

Passing Remarks 16 

Pic tsure'e Wand C 

Real Estate Transactions 17 

Scientific and Useful 9 

Sitting on a Stile (poetry) 12 

Society 3 

S|K>rting 7 

Sunbeams 10 

Tea Culture at Tomescal 16 

Thr Deadlock. 20 

Town Crier U 

U. S. Grant 10 

Wanted -A Museum 10 

Wells, Fargo & Co 10 

World. Flesh and Devil 8 



FINANCIAL REVIEW. 

There has been no material change in the Stock Market since last 
writing. The following is the latest news we have been able to obtain 
from the mines : On the 2,500-foot level of Union they are clearing out 
old drifts, repairing timber and doing necessary work before drifting in 
further. Work is also being done in the drift on the 2,300-foot level. A 
winze is being run on the 1,500-foot level of Ophir, in order to prospect a 
vein, some time ago. They are at work clearing out the old. drifts on the 
1,750- foot levels of Con. Virginia and California, and good ore is being 
extracted. The management are evidently satisfied that enough good 
ore exists on this level to form the basis of a good deal, and they are 
gathering in the stock for that purpose. Good ore is also being extracted 
on the 1,200-foot level, which is shipped to the mills under the Jones 
contract. 

The management of Hale & Norcross seem to conduct the work with 
the view of developing the late strike. If we are to believe one-half of 
the information from the inside, we may expect a full-fledged mine. The 
ore vein on the 2,800-foot level is wide and rich enough for milling pur- 
poses, and if it only continues down to the 3,000-foot level, the stock is 
very cheap at present market prices. 

In Sierra Nevada, work is chiefly being prosecuted on the 2,500-foot 
level, where a very favorable formation has been encountered in the south 
drift. 

The old favorite, Best & Belcher, which has never yet produced a 
pound of bullion, still finds numerous believers in the magnificent pros- 
pects on the 825-foot level. The reports are very encouraging, though the 
formation continues in porphyry. 

The Gould & Curry are in search of that ore body which is supposed to 
exist in the ground, on the upper levels, which has neyer been explored. 
Some people, however, who pretend to be well posted, believe that this 
ore can be had when the insiders think fit. It seems that the better the 
mines appear, the worse the market acts. 

The management of the Alta mine is the worst on record. We have 
heretofore expressed very fully our opinion of it, and can only hope the 
public have refused to pay the last assessment. The ledge that was re- 
ported on the lower level has not yet been found, and the water, said to 
be completely under control, has finally assumed such proportions as to 
drive the men out of the lower levels. The resort to the upper levels is, 
we believe, only a subterfuge to try and persuade the public to pay the 
delinquent assessment. Do not pay it. The mine is a fraud, and the 
managers are worse. 

The Navajo Mill has been stopped for a few days in order to make ne- 
cessary repairs, but we understand everything will soon be in running 
order, and bullion shipments will take place as usual from the Tuscarora 
favorite. 

In the Bodie district, Mono has, we understand, a fine body of ore on 
the 600 foot level. Although the vein is narrow, the ore is very rich. 

Argenta is cropping up again; the fraud is quoted at 5 cents a share. It 
is simply throwing monev away to touch it. 

Grand Prize, after collecting a $25,000 assessment, is still in debt, in 
spite of the grand bullion shipments. These are only a bait to lure spec- 
ulators into a coming deal. Leave it alone. 

The Day, alias Jack Rabbit, is in the usual plight, nearly S90.000 of an 
overdraft. The quotations of this stock are few and far between, and 
only wash sales. 

The Government of Eucador finds itself in difficulties, owing to its 
dealings with the interior of the country. A financial crisis has occurred 
at Quito, Riobamba, and at other places, and the notes at the banks of 
the capital have been terribly depreciated. The Vice-President of the 
Republic linformed a meeting of merchants that measures would be 
adopted to put an end to the crisis, and within three months the Govern- 
ment would be placed in funds, through heavier receipts of custom dues. 
It was also proposed to stop the issue of notes and the payment of 
salaries. 

After a windy night, or when the tide is high, gold is to be found all 
along the shore of Royapoonam, Madras. The women and children 
make a good livelihood by sifting the black sand. 

The Hudson Bay Company has decided to reduce its capital, by re- 
payment to its shareholders of £1 per share. 



PRICES OF LEADING STOCKS AND 00V. BONDS. 

San Francisco, Jan. 9, 18H5. 



Stocks and Bonds. 


Bid. 


Asked 


Stocks and Bonds. 


Bid 


Asktd 


BONDS. 








_ 




Cal. State Bonds, 6's,'57 .... 


— 


— 


BANKS. 






S. F. City & Co. B'ds, 6s, '68 


— 


— 


Bank of California 




158 


S. F. City & Co. B'ds, 7s ... 


— 


— 




ISO 


140 




— 


— 




117J 


111) 




— 


— 


RAILROADS. 






Sacramento City Bonds 


— 


— 




33 


36 


Stockton City Bonds 


— 


— 


0. P. R. R. Bonds (ex con.) 


108 


110 




= 


= 




(10 
58 
93 


90 






iml 

IJ4J 






Los Angeles County Bonds. 


— 


— 




102 
96 


106 


Loa Angeles City Bonds. . . . 
Virg'a & Truckee R. R. Bds. 


Qeary Street R. R 


97J 


- 


— 




20 
Nom. 




Nevada Co. N. G. R. R. Bda 




Nom. 




— 


— 


Clay Street Hill R. R 


_ 


_ 


Or.E&N.Co. Bonds, 6s 


107J 
L21J 


1081 
95J 
122 


3. F. Gaslight Co 


68 

'283 
51] 


59 


S. ?.R. R. Bonds 


Oakland Gaslight Co 


29) 
56 


U S. is (excou) 


N.PaciHc R.R. Bonds 


1UU 1 


101) 


Califor'a Powder Co . . 


125 


150 


INBORANCB COMPANIES. 


100 
140 


105 
150 


Giant Powder Co 


56 

50 
684 

87, 


58 




Atlantic Giant Powder 

Gold and Stock Telejr'h Co. 






65 




119 


124 


S.V.W.W.Co's Stock 


87* 




90 


100 


S.V.W.W.Co's Bonds 


M1SCRLLANE0P8. 






Pacific Coast S.S.Co's Stock 








80 


110 




80 


82) 




37J 
46 
30 


42) 
48 
36 


Presidio Railroad .... 


)0 
50 
















■a 

3.V 


u 4 

4J 




128 

107 J 










California Iron and Steel Co. 


California 


108J 



There is little of interest in the market. Spring Valley Water Stock 
is firmly held at the approach of the usual monthly dividend, payable to- 
morrow. Hawaiian Commercial Company also shows an increased in- 
terest. It is rumored that all the insurance companies will pay dividend.* 
this month. A. Baird, 411 Montgomery street. 

OLD BARS— 920 fine par. — Refined Silver— 16^ gH8 $ cent, dis- 
count. Mexican Dollars, 85@85£c. nominal. 

"Exchange on New York, 15c.@20c. ; on London Bankers, 49|d.@ 
49gd. Paris, sight, 5-12£@5-10 francs per dollar. Telegrams on New 
York, 20c.@25c. 



G 



49" Price of Money here, 6@10 per cent, per year — bank rate. In the 
open market, |@1£ per month. Demand fair. On Bond Security, 
5@6 per cent, per year, on Call. Demand good. 

INSURANCE ITEMS. 

The year 1884, just ended, has been a very disastrous one for Insurance 
Companies, and more especially in the Eastern field. On our own coast, 
we cannot congratulate ourselves as having escaped the ravages of the 
Fire Fiend, and Managers and General Agents are looking rather blue 
on the possible contingent commission in the net profits of their business, 
which to some of them will be very Bmall. The local companies, must 
of whom have Eastern Agencies, have suffered considerably from this 
source, and the general impression is that they would have fared far bet- 
ter by restricting their business to this coast than by swelling their pre- 
mium income and their loss proportion by entering the Eastern field. The 
Annual Statements have not yet come to hand, and we fear the showing 
will be nothing so satisfactory as that of the previous year. 

The Compact, bo termed, is slowly and surely making steady progress, 
and although there are many obstacles to be surmounted, in the way of 
brokers' and others' rights, we are of the opinion that in the end, things 
will be so regulated that all will run smoothly. 

There will, doubtless, be many complaints by insurers against what 
they may term exorbitant rates made by said Compact, but, upon in- 
quiring into the circumstances, they will find that, by complying wicn 
certain conditions which will be found to enhance the security and safety 
of their own property, their rate will be reduced in proportion as they 
reduce their fire hazard. We have heard many remarks disadvantageous 
to the " Compact," but we think it quite necessary to the well-being of 
the companies, and, therefore, must eventually redound to their standing 
and security, thereby assuring further additional proof of the indemnity 
offered to their patrons. 

In our future notes we trust to furnish you with more particular de- 
scriptions of the insurance business, both for the edification of those 
engaged therein, and for the general public at large. 

We respectfully beg to direct the attention of the Legislature to the 
following facts : A Grand International Exposition is now in progress at 
New Orleans. In that display, owing to the energy of Col. Andrews, 
California is well represented without a cent of cost to the State. In order, 
however, that this display be kept up properly, it is necessary that the 
fruit exhibit be changed every day or two, and this costs money. It 
would be advisable to appropriate a sum sufficient for the purpose. 

London, January 8. — Consols, 99 9-16d.@99 ll-16d. J Registered at the PoBtofflce at San Francisco, California, aa Secon-I-Ciass Matter. 

Printed and Published by the Proprietor, Frederick Marriott, 607 to 615 Merchant street, San Francisco, California. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Jan. 10, 1885. 



MEN I MEET— THE VENERABLE MASHER. 

[By Silver Pen.] 

I know of do class of men more deserving of criticism and contempt 
than the ancient humbugs, who, with one foot in the grave and the other 
on Kearny street, are intent, even up to their latest hour, on doing the 
la-de-dah with any foolish woman whom chance may throw in their way. 

The men of this particular order are, perhaps, more plentiful in San 
Francisco than any other city, although the genus is to be found in every 
part of the known world. Possibly the climate has somewhat to do with 
the juvenile feelings of the old gentlemen hereabout, it being a 
"glorious" one, and capable of performing wonders by its delightful balm 
and sparkling atmosphere. There must be something particularly 
rejuvenating in its influence, since men numbering three score and ten 
are frequently to be found among Love's votaries, however played-out 
they may look. The Old Masher is, of course, a married man, since 
bachelors of that age are more snarly and disagreeable to women than 
otherwise; but the ancient married man, having also an ancient wife at 
home, is, as it were, kept up to the mark. The old gentleman has a cer- 
tain polite duty to perform at home, albeit love has died down and given 
way to a calm friendship; still, it keeps his hand in, and by sprucing him- 
self up a good deal, and making free use of his loose cash, he considers he 
has a perfect right to go in for juvenile joys whenever he gets the chance. 
To a woman with a well-ordered mind the antics of the Old Masher are 
perfectly disgusting. She feels like reading a sermon or homily to him. 
and setting him in bis right place when he commences his little game of 
pressing her hand and asking her out to oysters; but then there are scores 
of silly women who are so void of sense as to be flattered by his atten- 
tions, and, with his cash in prospective, contrive to make the old gent 
happy while they bleed his pocket to death. 

The Old Mashers generally hunt in couples. After business hours they 
may be seen sauntering from their offices to Kearny street, and so on to 
Market street, in the endeavor to pick up some of their juvenile female 
friends, or females who are not their friends — it little matters to them 
who, so loDg as the young lady is passing good looking, and is disposed 
to tolerate tneir impertinent and senile admiration. This is a sine qua 
non with old men. 

The antics of these antideluvians are remarkably amusiDg. No youne 
dandy of the present day can come up to them. They are got up regard- 
less of cost, scrupulously clean about the shirt front, collars and cuffs, 
with highly-polished shoes and well-cut clothes. They strut along as 
though they owned the whole of the created earth. In reality, most of 
them wear spectacles, and are really so short-sighted that they are scarce- 
ly able to see the faces of the women they are trying to masb, but not 
for a kingdom would they acknowledge that fact. Should you pop into 
one of their offices unawares, and find the Masher "book in hand and 
spectacles on nose," he starts guiltily, and explains that he is saving bis 
sight by wearing glasses; he " has had a severe cold, and now and then 
his eyes are affected." The Masher disdains the society of middle-aged 
women, unless, happily, they are unusually entertaining, and then he 
tells you that he "has no use for girls — there's nothing in them." But 
these occasions are very rare, and it is generally the youngest and most 
bread-and-butterfied misses in the community that he marks for his 
prey. The Old Masher is lavish with his money, knowing that dollars 
only pave the way to the feminine heart. He is willing to give any 
amount for the pleasure of a young lady's company to lunch at any of 
the fashionable restaurants — " in a snug little parlor alone ; '.' and should 
she want a new dress, gloves or other apparel, she can have theui if she is 
smart. These little presents pave the way to future appointments, and 
the smart girl will take them and avoid the Masher ever after ; but there 
are others, of course, who are always willing to encore the oyster lunch 
diacun a son gout. 

The Ancient Masher has always an adorable wife, whose praises he 
sounds continually ; I presume by way of taking the harm off bis present 
flirtation with you. At first you are drawn into the belief that here, in- 
deed, is a true and respectable married man, who lovee his wife far too 
well to think of another, and so you are beguiled into a friendly state of 
feeling toward your grandpapa ; but, further on, as you become better 
acquainted with him, he becomes parental in his attentions, offers to kiss 
you " good-bye," and says that though he loves his wife, whom he has 
loved for 40 years better than any one below the sky, yet " when one 
meets with a dear little thing like you," with a tender pressure of the 
hand : "of course there is no resisting it." You are naturally shocked, 
but, in the course of time, find out that the Masher's advances 3re pre- 
cisely after the same pattern in all the old gentlemen. Evidently the 
Masher is in fearful dread of his wife. He will take you anywhere 
when night wraps her mantle round the earth, provided there are 
no gas or electric lights around, and he sets special emphasis on the 
fact that when his wife "goes East," which is a measure he is daily 
persuading her to take, he will be able to have an "immense time." 
Poor old gentleman ! and he never thinks how we are ridiculing him — 
the iron gray of his thin hair, his scraggy throat, spindle-shank legs, 
and large shoes, worn because of many corns, etc. 

The ancient masher is fuller of conceit than a peacock with outspread 
tail. He will believe any tomfoolery you utter. I remember a well- 
known venerable of this town coming to see me one evening. He would 
have been intensely loving if I had responded, but, as I hate old men, I 
gave him the coldest of shoulders. He then entertained me with a list 
of his loves and of all the " sweet girls " who were in love with him when 
he was School Director!!!! " I assure you," he said, "there was one 
lovely creature of sixteen, who came to my office continually, and who 
confessed her love for me, but, remembering my own daughter, I expos- 
tulated with her, and, in fact, had to drive her away." With my usual 
uncompromising abruptness I looked up and said: " I suppose she wanted 
a certificate, or a position. You know one is likely to sav almost any- 
thing when they are in need." Wasn't he mad? my! He never for- 
gave me that slap, but drawing himself up with dignity he said: " Nothing 
of the sort. I feel convinced the girl loved me for myself alone as others 
have done." " Yes," I Baid, tying my handkerchief into a knot and put- 
ting on my most aggravating tone, " you are not a bad looking old man, 
and therefore doubtless the girls make an exception in your favor; but, 
my dear Colonel, all the Directors are beloved equally for two years, and 
so long as there is anything to be got out of them." He came no more, 



but he is just a sample of the remainder of the old geese, who think be- 
cause a woman smiles sweetly upon them for what she can get, there is 
some irresistible charm about them which accounts for it. 

If the Venerable Mashers knew bow they are talked about, held up to 
ridicule, called impolite names, they would give up their vocation, and 
spend their loose cash on pool, billiards, poker, or anything but waste it 
upon the women who hold them in contempt and tell each other every 
word that has passed between the Masher and themselves. 



GOSSIP FROM NEW YORK. 

New York, December 30, 1884.— Among the recent arrivals from the 
Pacific coast nn one has been more cordially received by a host of friends 
than "Joe "Clark, who escorted Mrs. George Hearst and Mrs. A. E. 
Head and daughter the plains across. They arrived last week in a big 
snowstorm, and Joe soon had his fair charges and himself safely 
ensconced beneath the aristocratic and high-priced roof of the Bruns- 
wick. Since their arrival they have enjoyed excellent health, and Mr. 
Clark has had the full run of the Clubs, and haB been dined and wined to 
bis entire satisfaction. It would have done his fellow clubbers of San 
Francisco good last Sunday to have seen Joe whirling out on the road in 
Col. Logan's sleighing rig. He enjoyed it to his heart's content, and con- 
fessed that the apple toddies concocted at Gabe Case's roadside hostelrie 
were decidedly "neat," and as for the tiny cups of clam-juice, they were 
exactly what was required to tone his Btomach after a rather heavy din- 
ner the night before. Joe intends making a pilgrimage to Boston, and 
then meander down to New Orleans by-and-by, taking everything in be- 
fore he returns to your golden shores. 

Charley Kenuey, after exhausting himself in doing New York, con- 
cluded that his cup of experience would not be full until he should in- 
clude London, Paris and Constantinople in his rounds, so hied himself 
off a week ago for those continental pastures new. He was accompanied 
to the steamship wharf by Joe Vimont and Eugene Dewey, and had an 
excellent send-off. 

By the way, the statement in one of your contemporaries that Joe 
Yimont is hulding a small office in Tucson, Arizona, is far wide of the 
mark. Joe is a New Yorker to all intents and purposes, even if these 
intents and purposes do not amount to much, He has a copper mine in 
Jamaica, or some other West India island, out of which he expects to 
make a stake. 

Eugene Dewey has been exhibiting, to admiring friends, some of his 
elegant and aesthetic Christmas presents, including hand-paiuted satin 
bed-spreads, monchoir boxes, and easy chairs in the softest plush. The 
fair ones of San Francisco, whilom Eugene's favorite friends, must give 
way to the fair ones of this big city. Tdo idea that Eugene is home- 
sick, and wants to return to 'Frisco, is all bosh. He is pleasantly fixed 
here and has a wide circle of friends. His father and mother are near 
him. He has all that heart can wish, and isn't homesick a bit. 

Senator Fair is spsnding the holidays in our midst, and he can be seen 
any day " bearded like the pard," walking quietly down Broadway, look- 
ing for some of his old cronies, like Col. Gillette, with whom he likes to 
while away the hours with reminiscences of the Bonanza days of the 
Comstock. " Those were good, happy times, my son," he remarked to 
Gillette, with a sigh, as he moved along. Fair (does not seem to think 
that the ConiBtock is played out yet, by any means, and from his general 
conversation one would infer that the selling of his interests in the Ne- 
vada Bank did not necessarily prevent him from laying in a t-upply of 
Comstocks at present nominal prices. But it is hard to gauge Fair — es- 
pecially by his talk. 

The decision of Judge Sullivan in the Sharon divorce case created 
something of a panic among the "old boys" of the California colony. 
They were taken by surprise, and all they could say was : " Well, I'll 

be d d ! " The younger members of the Colony believe that Sarah 

Althea's claims are as thin as her proofs. George Roberts and Col. Bill 
Schaffer, Harry Logan and Alfred A. Cohen, Mayor A. A. Selover and 
Gen. Bill Lent all discussed the decision, soto voce, and they looked rather 
serious after their consultation. Col. Schaffer declared that the only 
way fur men like Sharon to avoid such responsibilities was not to write 
anything. " Always do as I do — employ a private secretary to do all 
your writing." 

If business is as dull in San Francisco, these closing days of the old 
year, as it is in New York, no wonder your people are ill-content. The 
oldest inhabitant here scarcely recalls such hard times. The brokers 
at the Stock Exchange, as a rule, have not made their salt for months; 
the speculators, from Jim Keene down to the smallest of the fry, have 
all lost money hand over fist; the investors, from D. O. Mills down, have 
been fleeced and shorn. Vanderbilt's sons have lost all their fortunes, 
and no doubt Stanford and Crocker will not have much trouble in buying 
elegant Fifth-avenue residences in the Spring, should their purposes still 
hold good in that direction. Stocks have shrunk abnormally; wheat is 
cheaper than for a decade; iron has gone down, and wages follow suit; 
steel rails can be bad for almost the asking — everything is dull, everybody 
complains of hard times, and hell is to pay generally. Everybody is hop- 
ing for the New Year and is promises of better times. They certainly 
can't be much worse. Occasional. 

E. Amaden, late of San Francisco, now of Yokohama, Japan, exports 
(skillfully packed) all classes of g >ods, from the rarest Curios and Works 
of Art to the more moderate grades, and invites correspondence. No. IS 
Yokohama, under Windsor Hotel. 



Save money and get the best! Burnett's Standard Flavoring Ex- 
tracts are of triple strength, and pure fruit extracts. For flavoring, use 
one-quarter the quantity of the ordinary extracts offered tor sale. 

See advertisement nn cover to know where to get the genuine 
Krue Champagne from Reims, France. Beware of California and other 
counterfeits. ^_ 

The Collateral Bank of Uncle Harris advances money on Pianos 
and all kinds of Securities at lowest rates. 15 Dupont street. 



10, 1886, 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTIKKK. 



SOCIETY. 



January 8th, 1885. " Ami th« rain it raim-th t-verv day," it the chief 
bardan ol our nog joat oow, and whan it i* not actually raining, tbe fo^ 
tills the bill tary aooaptably to those who prufeaa to pnrar damp weather 
as appropriate to the eaaaon, and rejuioe that the bud bo laldom shows his 
Faoa. - s niaty ueme to take a tinge From the skies, [or, although gaieties 
an attempted, then h ■ laoh of Bpirit about them moat noticeable, aud 
appatanUy go to an evening's danoe or rebeption more as a duty 
than ai ■ pleasure. 

The nrmana at the Pnaldio of the oldsters and yonngatere, Miss 

( Crocker's dinner, and the LUianthal-Garetle wedding, filled the evenings 

nf the earlier part of last week very satisfactorily. New Year's was a 

diaappoiotment, I venture to say, to nine tenths o! the residents of 'Frisco 

appointment to tho.se who received from the paucity of the calling 

element abroad ; and those who neither called nor received hail a growl 

nver the weather, which was gloomy enough to suit the taste of the most 

bropic. Even those who went to Monterey were not a whit more 

I .>r better off than those who remained in town. Take it all in all, 

I think the holidays have been a failure this year, from first to last. 

On Friday night a very pleasant little keno party was (riven at the San- 
■■„ dancing, of course, following the more serious business of the 
■ 

I >u Tuesday night our French residents welcomed their new Consul, 
M. Carrey, in a manner peculiar to their country at the Cerele Francaige, 
and be may now he considered "one of us" by them. Yesterday and 
last night was chosen by Mrs. Rutherford for her kettledrum reception, 
or whatever one may call it, which, despite the very unpleasant state of 
the weather, wis well attended, and proved a very enjoyable affair, Miss 
■tte making her formal debut, as it were, adding greatly to tbe in- 
terest of the occasion. 

To morrow evening is looked forward to with much impatience by the 
noble army of Crickets for their second german at B'nai B'lith Hall, 
Saturday is sacred to Angel Island, where a good time is a foregone con- 
clusion, unless it raius, and I doubt even that having the power to cast a 
damper ou the hospitality always to be met with at that delightful place. 

On Tuesday evening, of next week, a pleasant little party may be 
looked for at Mrs. Otis's, her daughter, Miss Lucy, playing the hostess 
ou that occasion. On Thursday, Mrs. Fair will opon her hospitable 
doors again, and entertain the Euthuno Club, whose two previous gather- 
ings have been so successful. But what have become of the many old 
houses whose open doors, in the past, earned for tbe city the title of 
" hospitable 'Frisco ? " So far, this season, they have all remained reli- 
giously closed, with every probability of their so remaining during the re- 
mainder of it. Among the pleasaotest houses lost to society this 
winter, few have been more missed than Mrs. Parrott's ; for, although 
her entertaining days have only commenced since the debut of her 
daughters into society, her parties have all been too charming to be easily 
forgotten. Tbe death of Mr. Parrott having placed them all in mourn- 
ing, she has elected to spend this winter at h.ir lovely country home in 
San Mateo, and sold her house in town. Fears are felt that she will not 
replace the latter, and, in the future, spend most of her time abroad, but 
one of her daughters now remaining unmarried of her rather large fam- 
ily "f girls. 

Preparations for Miss Bessie Kittle's wedding are progressing rapidly, 
and it is hoped that Dr. Scott's improvement in health may continue, 
so that a postponement of the event may not be necessary. She has de- 
cided that of her bridesmaids, her sister, Miss Dottie, who will perform 
the duty of " chief," shall alone appear in white, while the others are to 
be arrayed in colors. It will, no doubt, be one of, if not the prettiest, 
wedding party of the season. Among the prospective brides now in our 
midst is Miss Lula Howard, whose engagement to Mr. Baylerd is just 
announced, and in whose honor Miss Hattie Crocker's dinner was given 
last week. She has been spending the Winter so far with her brother 
Willie and his wife, but her mother, Mrs. Harry Bowie, will probably 
arrive back home here before the wedding day. Another charming bride- 
elect who has been warmly welcomed home from her brief visit East, is 
Miss Katie Hubbard, whose weddiny will take place in the course of a 
few weeks. The presence of Lieutenant Cotton in the city is causing a 
revival of the rumors of the past six months, and many think that the 
chosen entertainment for this visit will, after all, be a wedding reception 
in the castle on the hill. By tbe way, in my letter last week I alluded to 
the report of Miss Nettie Schmieden's engagement to Sam Ralston as one 
of the rumors of society, though not vouching for its truth. I have now 
much pleasure in correcting that statement, having it from the very best 
authority that there is no truth whatever in it. At the same time I can- 
not but condole with Mr. Ralston that he has not succeeded in the cap- 
ture of such a very charming young lady as the one in question. 

I can also say on excellent authority that Sir Thomas and Lady Hes- 
keth do not purpose visiting San Francisco for the present, all reports to 
tbe contrary notwithstanding. 

The Abbott Opera season has been one of the most fashionable suc- 
cesses of the winter, society appearing there nightly in full bloom and 
full feather. But how excessively unfortunate have been the Philhar- 
monics in the matter of weather ! Another dismal day was in order yes- 
terday for their final concert, and as a consequence the barn-like propor- 
tions of Piatt's Hall were painfully apparent, empty benches meeting the 
eye on every side. The programme was, however, excellent, and those 
who stayed away missed a treat. But 'Frisco is not yet the home of the 
" classical," whatever it may be in tbe future. It is still an exotic with 
us, and will require many a year of careful nursing ere it become popular 
with any save those who affect it because they deem it fashionable to do 
so. 

Among the distinguished strangers within our gates at this writing are 
Mr. James Ashbury, the famous yachtsman en route to Australia, who 
is, however, not strictly speaking a stranger to San Francisco, having 
paid us several visits, and is well known to our people ; and Lord Gar- 
moyle, with his traveling companion, Lord D'Arcy Osborn. While 
classing the former young gentleman under the heading of "distinguished," 
'tis not from the fact of his being a sprig of nobility — such visitors are by 
no means rare in 'Frisco— but for the reason that he has distinguished 
himself in his own country, especially among his own immediate circle 



of friends, by Ids extraordinary conduct there during the past year, and 
is here regarded more ai an object of curiosity than the majority of his 
countrymen who favor as with ■ visit, Mr. <;. A. Beta li almost due, 
also, but be, too, is only en route to the antipodes, and will 
but a short time. 

A ketttledrum will be given at B'nai B'rith Hall on Tuesday evening, 
January 20, 1886, at 8 o'clock, under the auspices of Mrs. John McMul- 
lin, for the benefit of tbe Ladies' Society of St. John's ! 
Church. Tickets, one dollar. 

Miss Lou Dearborns returned from her sojourn In Australia by the 
last steamer from there, and is at the Palace. Mrs. Kinkrad, wife of the 
Alaskan Governor, sailed for Honolulu last week, intending to make an 
extended tour of tbe Islands. The lady is a very graceful writer, and 
many of her friends hope that she may, on her return, be induced to give 
the reading public her impressions of her recent visit to Alaska and her 
present one to the Saudwich Islands, which would, undoubtedly, be 
told in a most pleasing manner. Mr. Louis Parrott has gone on a 
brief visit to Guatemala, ami the New Orleans higera has already begun, 
and will no doubt continue for some weeks. Mr. and Mrs. Clark Crocker, 
Miss Fanny and Mr. Heury Crocker, Mr. and Mrs. Sissou left Tuesday 
of last week, Mr. William Keith on Sunday last; and Dr. and Mrs. 
Lane and Mr. George Bonney left the same day for Mexico en 
Senator and Mrs. Miller and Miss Dora are there at preseut. FELIX. 

ATTRACTIVE CHURCH MUSIC. 

The mass that is to be sung tomorrow morning in the Spanish 
Church on Broadway, between Mason and Taylor, is the composition of 
E. C. Masten, a California musical am tteur, and was first Bang in Paris, 
just two years ago, in the large English Catholic Church on the Avenue 
Hoche. Leo Delibes, the composer of the celebrated ballet, Syti'la, and 
the opera Lacfcme (written for Van Zmdt), Theodore Dubois, orgauist of 
the Madeleine, and other shining lights iu French musical circles, pro- 
nounced, the mass a success, and congratulated the poung composer, ad- 
vising him to continue his studies in harmony and composition, aod to 
devote himself to music. He, however, preferred to rest on the laurels 
then acquired, and has since turned bis attention to other business. 

The mass contains passages of considerable merit, and of deep reli- 
gious fervor, and though not rising to gieatness, is a creditable work, and 
far ahead of the average mass sung iu these days. It will bear the 
criticism of the severest judges. The choir will consist of Miss Ellen 
Coursen, Mme. Ponton de Arce, Mrs. B. F. Sides, Misses May and 
Edith Thorne, Miss Ponton, Miss Durand, Misses Mamie and Emilia 
Masten, Miss Baker, Messrs. Carranza, Wheeler, Pecbin, Amos, Dyer, 
Hellman, White and other well known amateurs and artists. Mr. 
Joseph Roeckel will preside at the organ, and the whole will be under 
the direction of the composer. At the offertory, the Misses Thorne, as- 
sisted by tbe full chorus, will sing an "Ave Maria," also composed by 
Mr. Masten. 

The affair promises to be an important event, not only from a musical 
and religious standpoint, but also in a social way, as the composer is 
well known and popular in society and business circles. It is expected 
that His Grace, Archbishop Alemany, will assist in tbe religious services. 

■' Happy New Year to All." Complete happiness reading through 
Muller's Pebble Spectacles. 135 Montgomery street. 










if- 



10t* $ 



f 



-p- 



^ >f 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Office Navajo Mining Company, San Francisco, Ol., Jan. 
3d, 1885.— At a meeting of the Board of Directors of the above named com- 
pany, held this day, Dividend No. 12, of Twenty-five (25) Cents per share, was 
declared, payable on 

Tuesday, January 13th, 1885. 
Transfer books closed cm Thursday, Janaary 8th, 1885, at 3 o'clock p. M. 

J. W. PEW, Secretary. 
Office— No. 310 Piue street, Rooms 15 and 17, San Francisco, California. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Office of tbe H ibernia Savings and Loan Society, X. E. cor. 
Montgomery and Post streets, San Francisco, January 5th, 1885.— At a reg- 
ular meeting of the Board <..f Directois of this Society, held this day, a dividend at 
the rate of three and three-quarters {3%) percent, per annum was declared on all 
deposits for the six; months ending DecemberSlBt, 1884, payable from and after this 
(late, ' It. J. T0B1N, Secretary. 

DIVIDEND NO. ONE HUNDRED AND TWELVE. 

The Home Mutual Insurance Company will pay its Regu- 
lar Monthly Dividend of One Dollar ($1) per share upon its eapital stock on 
January 10th, 1885. CHAS. B. STORY, Secretary. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Jar.. 10, 1885. 



GLAUCUS AND PSYCHE. 

(Iiy George J. Duraind.} 

A sculptor of skill, disciplined in Art, 

Was Glaucus, with a glory-loving heart. 

At Athens was he born, when Roman away, 

Yet fettered the land, and darkened the day. 

In his boyhood, the grandest piles uf old 

Were daily scenes. His father early told 

The tales that hallowed each familiar place, 

Till the young Greek loved the history of his race — 

The echoeB (.f those famed heroic times, 

Falling on his soul like Bweet music chimes. 

But most of all he loved the figured atone, 

The frieze around Athenian temples lone — 

And hours flew by, as with enraptured gaze, 

He traced the aculptured gods of far-off days, 

Wrought on imperishable marble there, 

By some great Phidian hand with subtle care. 

And as he grew in years in him awoke 

The artist's aoul — the spark of Geniua broke 

Into a flame. So Glaucus learnt the art 

Uf sculpture, with the ardor of a heart 

Breaming its fondest dreams in Glory's lands, 

When Hope with rainbow hues the future spans. 

The years passed on with striving hours replete, 

And Glaucus toiled with man's aspiring heat. 

But yet the dreams that Youth had dreamt in tears, 

Left to accomplishment in later years, 

Came not with the long dayg, and harder toil 

Of earnest manhood o'er the midnight oil. 

Success is the dial, whatever be our plans, 

That marks man's merits with her fickle hands. 

'Tis cot true worth, nor industry that makes 

This life a triumph. Often Fortune shakes 

Her golden showers on the undeserved — 

On men without talent — who never served 

Their prenticeship to toil, or knew the tears 

Of life'd beginning — the slow steps of years. 

They mount Fame's ladder on the royal wings 

Of Circumstance, whose breath makes slaves or kings. 

Who marks the grief, the unavailing cries 

When toiling years deny Ambition's prize, 

And noble souls go down to namelesB graves, 

O'ermastered in the stemming of the waves ? 

Ah! the march, the strife, the vigilance, the care, 

Happy moments, and hours of despair. 

The patience unrequited save by tears, 

The unrewarded industry of years. 

Who that once, again with these would cope? 

Youth might despair, but for the buoyant Hope, 

That pencils every cloud with silver lining, 

When the weariest heart is sick and pining. 

The years passed on— and Glaucus to his Art 
His life dedicates with untrammeled heart. 
Seeking the dream, dreamt on his father's knee — 
An amaranth of immortality. 

In a broad vale's recess, sequestered, calm, 
GlaucuB pressed the green grass with his tall form. 
The setting sun shook his plenteous showers 
Of olden gold upon the leaves and flowers. 
Which bloomed around in blue and vermeil hues, 
Glistening with the silver of evening's dews. 
This leafy bower's solitude and shade, 
Glaucus long his familiar haunt had made, 
And now was dreaming of historic scenes — 
When valiant heroes sang his country's paeans — 
And forms august of gods, now flitting fast, 
In majestic corridors of the Fast. 
Afar the murmurs of the moaning sea 
Impart a sadnesB to his reverie. 

"Reft of tby fair robes, by thy sons forgot, 
Land of my birth, I weep at thy sad lot! 
Folded is the scroll of thy greatest names, 
With its bright record of most glorious aims — 
Forever gone thy monuments of power, 
The palace destroyed, and broken the tower — 
Thy poets have bung the lyre on the palm, 
And hushed is the lute with its varying charm. 
Yet art thou great in death. Upon thy brow 
Is set the seal of deathless Glory now. 
Where ere man dreams of Art, thy name is first, 
E'en though thy godlike sons in storied hearst 
Repose, dear to remembrance evermore." 

So spoke the sculptor with a mournful eye, 
Musing on the memories of times gone by, 
As he saw the Parthenon wall's arise 
In the distance on the edge of the skies. 
Dim with the dark shadows of the ages past, 
These shattered columns told, while falling fast, 
The death-day of empire — a nation's tomb, 
That cold Time wrapped in bis deadliest gloom. 
Against the twilight sky the evening star 
Gleamed like a gem within a rose's core — 
Still Glancus lingers in the sylvan vale, 
Linking stone memorials with ancient tale, 
And wrapt in Meditation's dreau y hood, 
The hours sped by within the green-clad wood. 



The golden twilight was waning slowly, 
And Glaucus grew lone, and his thoughts grew holy ; 
When Sleep his shadow pinions o'er him wave, 
Touching his brow with soft and gentle lave. 
The heavens put forth her eventide of gems, 
And the flowers hang drooping on the stems, 
But still the youth heeds not the balmy eve, 
And wanders in the land where fancies weave 
Their brightest palaces. O serene Sleep! 
Why not forever his tender vigils keep? 
For he now f**lt enchanted with a dream 
Most blissful. Two bright winged spirits seem 
To lead him back to Athens — to a spot 
Hallowed by happy days, too soon forgot — 
Up the Acropolis — toward a stone 
That once upheld a god, but now o'erthrown. 
Upon this column, where the Btatues pose, 
The fairy fairness of a woman rose. 
What ravishment of beauty in that face! 
Whose features all bespeak the Grecian race. 
The white gold-fringed brow, luminous with soul — 
And rosy-red the mouth. O'er the cheek stole 
The tint of Morn. The rounded radiance 
Of bosom tell of luxuries that entrance. 

splendid vision! A wealth of silken sheen, 
Burnished- -as Autumn's sun circles the green 
Of the full blown leaf with mellowest gold — 
In many a ringlet's grace and many a fold. 
The ample brow and noble forehead deck, 
Gilding the ivory whiteness of her neck. 

A creature of bewitching loveliness, 
She stood immovable, a marble goddess, 
Bathed in a flood of the moon's hovering light. 
Long Glaucus gazed, bewildered at the sight, 
Enthralled with rapture — till the figure turning, 
Looked at the youth with eyes like two stars burning ; 
And raising high, with Boft alluring charm, 
The tapering fullness of a Bnow-white arm. 
Her lips disparted like the twin born rose, 
When the Zephyr hiB softest kiss bestows — 
The floral pride of the sweet-scented Spring- 
She spoke these wordB as the nightingales sing: 

" I am the permeating Soul 

Of all beautiful things. 
The stars magnificence of light! 

The flower's fragrant springs! 
I give to the winds wandering voice 

.iEolian symphonies — 
And to the lyre's breathing tones 

Heart-touching melodies. 
I am the Genius of all arts, 

And their mysteries reveal — 
I am the e\ erlasting Dream 

Of the artist'B ideal. 
My name is Psyche. Mortal, list: 

Thou art the one I seek. 
Sometimes in woman's fairest form 

To noble minds I speak. 
Dream of the beautiful in Art 

With a pure, spotless soul, 
And love the foim embodying it, 

And thou shalt win tby goal." 

Just as his trembling lips began to frame 

A syllable of love, and Psyche's name, 

A cloud there seemed to lower from the skies, 

And wrap the vision from his moveless eyes. 

With hasty start the young Athenian woke, 

And found his dream had ended all in smoke. 

Just o'er an eastern cloud the moon was peeping, 

As if it, too, had been engaged in sleeping. 

Then back to Athens Glaucus hurried fast, 

But saw no Psyche. The moonlight cast 

A silver gleam around the column's site. 

The dark eternal splendor of the night, 

The silence and solitude of the tomb, 

Filled the young sculptor's breast with gloom. 

The beauty of his dream-love's matchless face, 

Him haunted with its nameless mystic grace. 

" Give me my chisels," Glaucus cried ; " be quick, 

1 have not lost the deftness nor the trick 
Of fashioning forms of marble elegance." 
With that he straight began, as in a trance, 
To carve the figure of bis waking dreams 
Out of choicest Parian marble. It seems 
There's refreshment in toiling with an aim 
Bern of love. It quiets passion's burning flame. 
And Glaucus felt a quietude of sense, 
Hewing the stone with energy intense. 

The great work grows beneath his tireless hand, 

Unfolding, like the flower 'neath Nature's wand, 

In beauteous development. Hour by hour 

The marble form displays a wildering dower 

Of richest gifts in perfect symmetry, 

Bodying forth his vision to the eye. 

Each day brings some new grace, some feature bright, 

Culled by the fancy in its loftiest flight, 

Until at last the work has slowly grown 

Into completeness — a wonder of stone — 

A marvel by the glow of genius wrought — 

A grand creation of immortal thought. 



Jan. 10, | 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



' N.itutv DM tin mold a form an fair to cast," 
UewaiU'ii the tculptor, dreaming of the post, 
Ami kiaring the dumb li|w i>f Imaged Btoae, 
RaapoDMleM u> the fond dbtmmi Mown, 

' r.'l.l, p.i.--iMhl.:-s, without :i wnrmhu] Dfttrt, 
Thou bu*t ib« Beauty, not the Bool of .in. 
Oh, for the Promethean spark »'f life 
Ti' wake within thy enow-still breast thy strife 
Of vaning passions to send the hot blood through 
Thy pale marble peine, oolored with oleareat blue. 
I ne'er on earth thy archetype shall see ; 
Thou art the bridal of my Art and me, 
ti shadow of my Dream!" 

Glory has no power to Boothe tho heart, 
When its tine chorda are BQndered and apart. 

The sculptor's old-time fealty to Fume 

\V;i> dead, with iU pure .singleness of aim. 

At every conscious hour, before his eyes 

In all its sensuousness would arise 

His dream-love, and go and come again, 

And its repression brought an aching pain. 

His love of ideal beauty now was gone, 

With its pure worship of flowers and morn, 

And in its place was au idolatry 

Of lovely forms passion melting with a sigh. 

Was this defeat, a loss beyond recall, 

A weakness, or for the soul a fall ? 

Is then the birth of Love the death of Art, 

And the sign of a downfall of the heart? 

Say rather 'tis the crown of perfect life — 

The opening of the rose— the grape all rife 

With luscious juice — of the ripe peach the dawn — 

The glow that comes before the waking morn, 

The sign of highest development. 

In the mad rush and whirl of passions deep, 

Glaucus wandered to the memorable heap 

Of scattered columns, where, in his sweet dream, 

Fair Pysche stood. The melancholy gleam 

Of sunset tills with dark imaginings 

His mournful soul, and round the marble flings 

A glow that gilds the stone-wrought prodigies 

Of old with light's soft, tender mockeries. 

Sudden he sees again that form of grace, 

His haunting vision and her star-lit face. 

So rose-like still, so beautifully calm 

In the moonlight's serene, silvery charm — 

Her figure faultless in its symmetry 

Of tapering limbs, voluptuous to the eye. 

Mute, motionless, he stands transfixed with dread, 

His thoughts o'erwhelmed and his feelings dead, 

Lest the vision would vanish like a ray 

Lost in a cloud at the close of the day. 

At length he breathes her name. 

She turned to him, and in her heavenly eye 
Beams all tbe blue ethereal of the sky. 
"Who calls Psyche?" she said. 

'* O Genius of Music, Poetry and Art! 
Spirit incarnate! if thou bast a heart 
Speak to me," said Glaucus. 

'I am no goddess with immortal crown," 
Keplied tbe form, descending to the ground. 

' A human heart beats in my bosom's core. 
I am a mortal, and come from Corinth's shore, 
Yet my name is Psyche." 

Then there weighed upon him « cold leaden fear, 

As if the form had fled. Approaching near 

He sees that she is mortal, but imaged 

In semblance to his Psyche. Then there waged 

A war of feeling in his burning breast — 

A tumult of love, rapture of the blest. 

O rose-crowned Love! spell omnipotent! 
Of life the elixir and enchantment! 
O subtle essence! strangest of strange powers! 
Unto the coldest hearts imparting hours, 
Melcdious winged, with eloquence divine — 
And giving precious gems from Wisdom's mine 
Unto the dullest son of Folly! 

Then Glaucus told his tale, and from her drew 
Words of requitement, fresh'niog as the dew. 
Unto the dying flower, drooping low. 
In awe-like majesty, upon the brow 
Of earth hung the coronet of Night, 
With all its glittering brilliancy of light. 
Yet Glaucus pours into the listening ears 
Of Psyche his vows, his hopes and his fears ; 
His fluttering fancies thick as golden pears 
On the fabled tree of Hesperides. 

Oh, welcome was the sun that brought the Morn, 
And Psyche, still lovelier than the dawn. 
He leads her to tbe place, where her fair form 
In marble rests, but starts with quick alarm, 
For where the work of years in beauty rose, 
Gladdening his eyes with soft alluring pose, 
There was a void — the marble form had fled — 
The Psyche of his toiling hours was dead. 



BANKS. 



LONDON, PARIS AND AMERICAN BANK (LIMITED', 

205 Sanaomo Street 



Authorized CupUul 

Nub.crlbetl Capital 

PnlU I j> 



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2,500,0111* 

-.0.10,(0(1 



DAVID CAHN Hunger | BTJOENE UBTER Sub-J 

Head Olllco. -9 .,„,! 10 TOKENH008E SARD, LOTHBUBY, LONDON 

A|teiit«.-NKW YORK: Amino} .it tlu London, Parlu mil Amnion Hank 
(Limited), Iti I'.xi limine I'liu-e. I'AKls: Mussrfl. Luz;ird Freros &Cie, LORuoSti 

Draw Direct on the Principal Cities of the United NUUy, Great Britain Ireland' 

France, Germany, Russia, Austria, Italy, Balgil Holland, S|iai.i, Switzerland' 

China, Japan, Australia, Centra! and South America, COMMERCIAL and TRAV- 
ELERS' CREDITS issued, available throughout the world, COLUX T10N8 MAUI-; 
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BANK OF BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

Incorporated by Royal Charter.— Capital paid up, 81,730,- 
000, with power to increase to $10,000,000. Reserve Fund. $260,000. Southeast 
corner California and Sansomc streets. Head Office— 28 OornbtU, London 
branches— Portland, Oregon; Victoria and Now Westminster, Uritish Colombia, 

rhis bank transacts a General Banking Business. Accounts opened subject to Check 
and Special Deposits received, Commercial Credits granted available in all parte of 
the world- Approved Bills discounted and advances made on good collateral security. 
Draws direct at current rates upon its Head Office and Branches, and upon its Agents 
as follows : 

Now York, Chicago and Canada— Bank of Montreal ; Liverpool— North and South 
Wales Bank; Scotland —BritiBh Linen Company; Ireland— bank of Ireland ; Mex- 
ico and South America— London Bank of Mexico and South America ; China and 
Japan— Chartered Bank of India, Australia and China; Australia and New Zealand 
—Bank of Australasia, Commercial banking Company of Sydney, English Scottish 
and Australian Chartered Bank. 

" ~ , THE BANK OF CALIFORNIA, SAN FRANCISCO. 

Capital $3,000,000. 

WM.AI.VOBl> President 

THOMAS BROWN, Casnter | B. MURRAY, Jr., AsVt Casbler 
Aornts : 

New York, Agency of the Bank of Calfornia ; .Boston, Tremont National Bank , 
Chicago, Union National Bank ; St. Louis, Boatman's Saving Bank ; New Zealand, 
the Bank of New Zealand. Correspondent in London, Messrs. N. M. Rothsuliild & 
Sons. Correspondents in India, China, Japan and Australia, . 

The Bank has Agencies at Virginia City, and Correspondents in all tbe princi- 
pal Mining Districts and Interior Towns of the Pacifl Coast. 

Letters of Credit issued, available in all parte of the world. Draw direct on New 
York, Boston, Chicago, St. Louis, New Orleans, Denver, Salt Lake, Cincinnati, 
Portland, 0., Los Angeles, London, Dublin, Paris, Berlin, Bremen, Hamburg, 
Fraukfort-on-the-Main, Antwerp, Amsterdam, Copenhagen, Stockholm, Christiana, 
Locarno, Melbourne, Sydney, Auckland, Hongkong, Shanghai, Yokohama, Genoa, 
and all cities in Italy and Switzerland. 

THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Paid op Capital 81,500,000, Gold. President, Daniel Cai- 
laguan. Vice-President, GEORGE A. LOW; Cashier, E. D. MORGAN' 

Assistant Cashier, GEO. W. KLINE. 

DiRRCToas.— D. Callaghan, C. G. Hooker, Peter Donahue, James Phelan, James 
Moffitt, N. Van Bergen, James H. Jennings, George A. Low. 

CORRESPONDENTS.— Loudon : Bank of Montreal, No. 9 Birchin Lane, Lom- 
bard street, Dublin : Provincial Bank of Ireland. Hamburg : Hesse, Neuman 
& Co. Paris: Hottinguer & Co. New York: National Bank of Commerce. Boa- 
ton : Blackstone National Bank. Chicago : First National Bank. This Bank is pre- 
pared to transact a general Banking business. Deposits in Gold, Silver and Currency 
received subject to check or on special deposit. Exchange for sale on the principal 
cities of tbe United States, Great Britain, Ireland and the Continent. Couimercia 
Credits issued available in Europe, Chii.a and Japan. Collections attended to and 
prompt returns made at the lowest market rates of Exchange. Juno 28. 

THE CALIFORNIA SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY, 

N. W. Corner Eddy and Powell streets, San Francisco. 

Loans made on city and country real estate at current rates. Term and ordinary 
deposits received. Dividends paid in January and July. 
Last dividend, paid in January, 4.50 per cent. 

DIRECTORS— David Farquharson (President), Robert K. Bunker Vice-President), 
John Bain (Treasurer). John Easton (Surveyor), J. F. Cowdery (Attorney), A, C. 
Corbctt, Edward Farrell, Joseph R. Wilcox, Thomas Downing, diaries D. Farquhar- 
son, Chas. Lux. [July 12.J Vernon Campbell, Secretary. 

LONDON AND SAN FRANCISCO BANK, LIMITED. 

Capital, S2.100.000. 

San Francisco Office, 424 California street; London Office, 
22 Old Broad street. Portland Branch, 48 First Street. 
Manager ARTHUR SCRIVENER. 

Assistant Manager, WILLIAM STEEL. London Bankers— Bank of England and 
London Joint Stock Bank; New York, Drexel, Morgan & Co.; Boston, Third Na- 
tional Bank. This Bank ib prepared to transact all kinds of General Banking 
and Exchange Business in London and San Francisco, and between said cities 
and all parts of the world. June 9. 

THE ANGLO-CALIFORNIAN BANK, LIMITED. 

N.E. Cor. Sansome and Pine Streets. 

London Office, 3 Angel Conrt ; New York Agents, J. W. Sel- 
igman & Co., 21 Broad street. Authorized Capital Stock, 36,000,000. Will re- 
ceive Deposits, open Accounts, make Collections, buy and sell Exchange and Bullion, 
loan Money, and issue Letters of Credit available throughout the world. 

FRED. F. LOW, I ,, „ 
IGN. STEINHART, f Mana E er 3- 
P N. LruBNTBAL. Cashier. Sept. 13. 

THE NEVADA BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO. 

Capital Paid Up $3,000,000. 

Agency at New York, 62 Wall street. 

Agency at Virginia, Nev, 



Buys and sells Exchange and Telegraphic Transfers, 
elers' Credits. 



Issues Commercial and T>av- 

Nov. 8 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Jan. 10, 1865. 



PLEASURE'S .WAND. 

Wo Obey no Wand bntPlea» nre'»."-- Tom Moot*. 



Berlioz said that, in " order to aot mueioally on the human oiguua- 
ti„„ Bound must be within a certain dwtance of the auditor. It ib not 
enough n be able to hear perfectly well-one must vibrate to the = , 

i tYis vibration, which is the cause of the emotion produced by mime 

uarry beyond a certain point." His conclusion was that modern 



lid til 

will not 



Her thin 
entire 



ipera- houses were too big, and that the smaller the theatre the more 
. Sac .ry the performance. To me there is much truth m the deduction. 
i know 1 always enjoy a play or opera better when I am near the Stage. 
It is surprising to note the number of persons who have expressed the re- 
• ei that they could not get as near to Patti, and Gerster and Galaesi as 
they to Abbott and Tagliapietra. It would not surprise me if ... this 
cEness to her audience existed the greater part of Abbotts success. 
I cannot help searching for extraneous causes for this, for, although aa- 

mitttag the many r 1 points of the Abbott performances the praise 

awarded to them are always inconsistent with their artistic merit. 

In Maritann and the Bohemian Girl, the troupe appeared at its very 
best. The chorus sang with spirit, and Abbott Aunaudale, 1< abrin. 
Castle, Oampobello, Tagliapietra, Brodenok and Allen, sang and acted to 
the perfect satisfaction of all. The Traviala performance proved to be a 
. 'en nine surprise to everyone. It was thought that Abbott had touched 
the limit of her ability as Miguon, and her attempt to sing Vic letta was 
retarded with disdain. But strange to say, she sang in the first and sec- 
ond acts as she has never before sung here. 1 he brl.uisi was not partlcu- 
larl, promising. The defects of voice and method that are obstacles in 
Abbott's path as a -ingcr of Italiau opera were prominent 1 be surprise 
came in the scena " Ah, fors e lui." Abbott dropped the English text for 
this cavatina. She sang with a breadth of voice, a fullness of tone, a 
dei.th of feelii.K and a smoothness of phrasing most unexpected and most 
incomprehensible. The instruction which she claims to have received 
durin- the past Summer from a celebrated teacher, is the only possible 
esnlanation. It must nevertheless have been confined to the one role of 
Vmletta as in no other opera has she displayed such iaiproveiue.it. In 
the duo with Germont, the result of study was also noticeable, although 
in a lesser decree. Iu the third act she displayed some dramatic force- 
also a surprise. In the last scene she was her wonted self, weak and 
trivial This bit of operatic work may be considered as a spurt merely. 
It was in exhibition of feminine inconsistency, I aught say ' oussea- 
,,ess " to be for a brief moment, a better singer and a better actress, 
than' she has any right to be, to judge her by her performances taken all 
together. „ 

» » w w 

\s Rosin* Abbott displayed all her faults and weaknesses. 
notes in the middle register, the voce di testa quality of h 
voice, her inability to sing florid music, and the lack of idealism m 
her manner. To speak of voice and execution only, it did not seem pos- 
sible that it was the same singer who had sung the Ah f OH elm and 
the "Sempre Libera" with such rich tones and smoothness of horiture. 
Campobellu as Figaro, and Castle as Almaviva, were, in a measure, true 
to tradition in their work, but all of the others so modernized the comedy 
Of the opera that the performance was better suited to the burlesque 
than to the operatic stage. 1 do not think it is worth while to dilate on 
the absurdity of this. „ , « 

In Carmen the compauy seemed to be at cross-purposes. The orchestra 
was unsteady, the chorus sang with hesitation, the artists entrusted with 
the minor parts manifested their anxiety to do well aud .lid not do well 
and things generally were confused. Laura Bellun sang Michaela_ with 
much sweetness and pathos, and Tagliapietra was a loreador full ol dra- 
matic vigor These two artists redeemed the performance. Miss Annan- 
dale is totally unsuited to the character of Carmen. Neither in voice, 
nor manner, nor in appearance, is she qualified. 

\s Lasarillo in MarOano, and the Gipsy Queen in the Bohemian Girl, 

Miss Aunaudale is at home. Her voice, with its full, round tones is 
heard with pleasure in the many ballads that make up the scores ot the 
two parts. 9 „ 

Tagliapietra returns to us unchanged. His »oice is as husky, his singing 
as etfective, if, at times, too loud, his acting as dramatic and his person- 
ality as oharmihg as a year ago. His Germont was well sung, but there 
was' a suggestion, at least, of bawling to his "Dl Proveuza. In the 
BoAemionOu-Jhesang-The Heart Bowed Down with a superlative 

amount of pathos. In Carmen, he sane; the Toreadors song admirably. 
The hosliiness of his voice may be an inherent quality, but it is intens.- 
tied by a faulty uietho I of emission. Ihe notes are forced through the 
throat with evident effort, losing much of their fullness. I presume 
Tagliapietra is too far advanced iu his career to attempt to remedy this 

defect. „ 

# * * 

Utbongh three other operas have been presented, they can not be 
commented upon in this number, the management having bunched them 
at the end of the week. So far Bight operas have beeu produced. Five 

of them may be classified as good performances— Martha, UarUana, Uig- 

„„„ Bohemian Qirl and Traviata. One as indifferent— SemiromKte, ana 

two as very bad-Jar(wl of SaiiUe aud Carmen lor next week Le- 

ffeorl and Hand is announced, and for the following week [olantht 

is promised. These are welcome announcements. ^ 

For the last Philharmonic Concert, a brilliant programme was offered. 
Mendelssohn's Troiupetteu Overture is a brilliant composition, the 
orchestra played ii wiih a ; 1 de d of dash. Spohr b Ninth \ lolinl on- 

CertO, op. 56, is a ditti mil thin,- to play. Oar favorite virtuoso, Heury 
Hevmau, did full justice to it. The technical intricacies were surmounted 
with ease, and the spirit of the work was rendered with breadth of tone 
and with admirable phrasing. In the execution there are series ol tenths 
and successions of sustained notes that require much mechanical pre- 
cision, and in this Mr. Heyuuui displ lyed his finished method. Ihe ar- 
tistic instinct, without which the performance of such a work would be 



but a monotonous effort, is happily possessed by Mr. Heyman to a high de- 
cree By his playing of this concerto, and of Raff s cavatina, given as an 
emore, with delicious sentiment, Mr. Heyman substantiated the opinion 
of musicians who give him high rank as a violinist. Bitters Aut der 
Wacht " is a bright little musical picture of martial coloring. It is a part 
of a piano forte opus, and the only one of the several movements com- 
prising the work which the composer has instrumentated. I ;■■■■ 



some difficulties of tempo for the string instruments which were overcome 

Jmnrk is a composer who is rapidly becoming famous as a 

urker in musical effects. His style has but little originality of melody, 

in vividness of harmonic treatment he has but few equals. Ihe 



'ith ease. Goldmark i 



His style has but little originality of melody, 
but in vividness of harmonic treatment he has but few equals. Ih< 
"Laendliche Hochzeit" symphony is strongly characteristic, i he 
" I bichzeilsmarsch" consists of ingenious variations of a striking themi . 
The " Brautlied " reflects the passionate love and sentimental pathos ot 
the bridal couple. The " Serenade " is of complex composition, and its 
true musical sense is not easily discernible. The fourth movement 1m 
Garten," is a masterly manipulation of orchestral possibilities. In its 
harmonic evolutions there is a touch of the Wagnerian spirit Ihe 
" Tanz " is full of rhythmic life, beautified by rich instrumentation. 
With its brilliancy, it aptly clo B es one of the most effective of modern 
orchestral compositions. Goldmark is fluent, if not original, in melody, 
and versatile to the extreme, iu his orchestration. He fully understands 
the capabilities of the different instruments, particularly that ol the 
strings. To the credit of the orchestra, it played the symphony admir- 
ably. There was technical precision and a con amore spirit in their work. 
Mr Hinrichs evidenced less self-repression and developed more artistic 
freedom in his leading on this occasion. All in all, it was a magnificent 
finale to the season. It is probable that one extra concert will be given. 
The Society purposes continuing its good work. It is developing tne 
taste for orchestral music, and will surely receive in time the meed of ap- 
preciation it deserves. # # 

My earliest minstrel recollections are clustered around Billy Birch, 
Sam Wells and Ben Cotton. Wells' fame was a local one. He died 
many years ago. Birch, who became so prominent a member of the 
burnt cork fraternitv. departed this life some months since. But Ben Cot- 
ton remains, with his unctuous laugh unchanged. I remember seeing him 
with Dan and Neil Bryant twenty-two years ago, at the hall on Broad- 
way, near Grand street', New York. Twelve years ago he was here-one 
of the " Four Doves," the burlesque so many weeks the amusing attraction 
at Shiels' Opera House. Since then he has abandoned minstrelsy for specia.- 
ty melodrama. A daughter has grown up. and he has put ber versatile tal- 
ent to profit. Idalene Cotton is a bright, clever girl. She is natural and 
self possessed on the stage, she has a voice which promises to be ot good 
quality when fullv developed, uuless unduly forced by premature use, 
and she has decide'd mimic talent. The play in which she is now seen is 
the quintessence of trash. Its absurdities may suit an audience ot town 
or country where intelligence is limited and where the knowledge of things 
is circumscribed, but it cannot draw appreciation from persons of educa- 
tion and refinement. It would be but justice to the young lady to divert 
her budding talent into better channels. Ben Cotton is at home in the 
play in the character of a good-natured darkey. C. H. Brooks plays the 
part of a Jew, with a good dialect, which would be more effective if the 
characterization was less exaggerated. 

• * * * 

Emerson is making a big bid for popular patronage by a reduction of 
prices to a verv low rate. The entertainment offered by bis troupe at 
the California Theatre is a very good one. The singing is excellent and 
the specialties are interesting. 

* * * * ■ 

The holiday spectacle at the Tivoli has made a hit. It is jo its last 
ni-hts. On Monday next Heart and Hand will be given. The produc- 
tion of this operetta" of Lecocq's, by the Krelings, on the samejilght as it 
is snng by the Abbott Company, seems like 
ing to compere the performances. 



i deti. It ' 



ill be interest- 
Beauclehc. 



Miss Susie Blair stave a splendid Concert, with full orchestra led by 
Prof C Goffrie, her master, at Piatt's Hall on Tuesday evening last. 
The hall was well filled by an appreciative and fashionable audience, and 
the talented young debutante won a streat success by her masterly and 
beautiful violin-playing. She plays clearly and evenly. Her bowing 
leaves nothing to 'be desired, and the way in which she performed the 
difficult Mendelssohn Concerto with Orchestral Accompaniment calls for 
the utmost praise and appreciation of her great talent and taste. Miss 
Lula Joran plaved Beethoven's Concerto with Orchestra in splendid 
Btyle, and, as an "encore, played Joseffv's "At the Spring." The trio by 
Beethoven, by Miss Susie Blair, Miss Lula Joran am. Mr. binile Knell, 
also gave great satisfaction. Miss Van Arnam, a young lady with a 
lovely voice, sang " II Bacio " beautifullv, and, as an encore, 'Dresden 
China " aud was warmly applauded. Her second song was the Bee bong, 
by V Masse, which was also beautifully k'iven. She is a pupil of Mrs. 
L Higgs. Signor Baldanza delighted every one by his graceful rendition 
of " Win c ver," which he had to repeat. The whole concert was highly 
satisfactory, and the programme one of the best ever given in this city. 
We wish Miss Blair a brilliant future. 

In every respect for concerts] lectures, exhibitions and public meet- 
ings of all kinds, the Metropolitan Hull, Fifth street, near Market, has 
advantages possessed by no other public hall west of the Mississippi river. 
It has a "first-class organ, s:reat seating capacity and superb appointments. 




Tlx© Best 



INDORSED BY 
FOR SALE EVERYWHERE 



PDEE NATURAL 

Mineral 

Water! 



THE MEDICAL PROFESSION. 

DEPOT, 51S SACRAMENTO ST. 



Jim. 10, 1S£5. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



SPORTING. 



Yaohttng. The CarmeliU is launched, and when u few internal tit 
tink'»* have been oomplated sh» will start f'»r this port, and no ty be looked 
for before May 1st. One other yaobt baa made the trip from New fork 
to Sao Pranotsco, ria Btraita of Ma#elUn, the Ariel, we think >!i-.- took 
ISO days. The outlook for next season i* moat excellent. When Mr. 
iii's yacht gets amongst the Heet, all the flyers will be eager for a 
brush, and we think none of them will be refused that pleasure, -Mr. 
(iutte, owner of the Chispa, baa determined t<> have another tussle with 
the Nellie, and we expect it will he one of the first contests of the coining 
season. We think th* Nellie will again hold her own, but whatever may 
be the result, the race will be once more the most evenly contested that 
can take place between any two yachts in the fleet. Dr. Merritt, the 
owner of the Casco, will appear in a new character next season. For 
years paat he has been a cruising yachtsmao, and bulcta the palm in 
that department of the sport. Races and regatta* he has firmly refused 
to take a band in. Now he is a changed man. Early next Spring he 
will change the spais of his yacht, and give her a great deal more can- 
vas; then he will freely enter the Casco in regattas and races— in fact, 
meet all comers in the Bay or outside the Heads, confideut that lie can 
show the whole fleet a clean pair of heels. We hail the Doctor's good 
intentions with delight, and hope he will keep them well in tuind when 
April comes around. The Hon. James Ashbury, a distinguished English 
yachtsman, is at present on a visit to this city. We think this is his 
third or fourth visit, and we are sorry that so many of our fleet are in 
Winter quarters, for we should have ltkeoSbim to have seen the Halcyon 
and the Lurline, to show him what advances we have made in yacht- 
building since the days when he presented the Ashbury Tankard as prize 
fur the yachts of the Sao Francisco Club to compete for. 

Bicycling. — The most interesting event in this department of sport 
which has ever taken place in this citv, will he held in the Mechanics' 
Pavilion to-night, when the Bay City Club will offer their first tourna- 
ment. The programme we have already published in detail, includes 
races ranging from half a mile to ten miles. There will also be a drill 
by members of the Club who have been long and assiduously practicing 
a number of intricate movements. The fancy riding is also a welcome 
feature, and on the floor of the JPavilion the trick riders- of the Club 
should be able to work wonders on their machines. The management is 
in most excellent hands, the referee being that veteran wheelraau, Geo. 
H. Strong. W. C. Brown, of the Olympic Club, will act as starter, the 
three judges are Ben. Benjamin, H. C. Finkler, T. Jennings; timers, H. 
B. Cook, P. Mclntyre, H. J. Lucas; judge of walking, L. G. Burnett; 
clerk of course, Geo. H. Day; managing committee, F. It. Cook, E. 
Mohrig and W. J. Munro; handicappers, E. Mohrig, T. Hill, S. F. 
Booth, Jr. With such a brilliant cloud of exquisite talent, the long pro- 
gramme should be carried out with the smoothness of the music of a 
marriage bell. On Thursday night, the annual meeting of the San 
Francisco Club was held, when officers for the coming year were elected. 
The annual banquet followed, but as the proceedings were delayed until 
an advanced hour, we are compelled to hold over our report until next 
week. 

Wrestling.— At the last moment the managers of the Central Park 
retired from the Whistler-Cannon wrestling match, and not very grace- 
fully, either. For two weeks they had offered a purse of 8750, in addi- 
tion to the alleged §500, depending upon the result of the affair, and only 
when the audience where in the Pavilion, on Monday niyht, did they an- 
nounce that "other arrangements had been made." The attendance was 
very slim. When the expenses were paid from the receipts we expect the 
wrestlers would barely have enough coin to enjoy a night's spree. The 
exhibition needs very little description. Cannon is a good catch-as catch- 
can performer, but never was and never will be a match for Whistler. 
The first bout lasted forty-two minutes, and was given by Whistler to 
Cannon. Many of t.he movements were very pretty, and showed huw 
well the pair had rehearsed. There was a sad falling off in the second 
bout, Whistler doing the bulk of the work. Fourteen minutes of this 
sort of thing wearied Whistler, and be flattened Cannon out with more 
ease than grace. The third attempt had the only merit of being the 
shortest of the three. Whistler picked Cannon off the floor and dropped 
him heavily on the broad of his back within five minutes of the opening 
of the bout, thus winning two falls out of three, and the exhibition. 

Trout Fishing. — Will some officer of the State Sportsman's Associa- 
tion send a copy of the game and fish laws to the editors of our daily 
sporting papers, where they are very much needed. The close season for 
trout commenced on October 1st, and continues until April 1st, yet within 
a week we read that " tine trout fishing can be had in Paper Mill Creek." 
In another paper, "a gentleman of Santa Barbara, while fishing in Dos 
Pueblos Creek, caught a speckled beauty that measured fourteen 
inches." But these breaches of the game laws, instead of receiving an 
indignant rebuke, meet the silent approval and commendation of news- 
papers that should be the first in the field to condemn these law breakers. 

The Ring. — The air of the city in the region of the daily papers is 
full of challenges — Cleary and Manning, Whistler and Brady, Hamilton 
and Palmer, Campbell and Sotto, McCauley and Goldsmith, all want to 
tight each other. We hope they will do so, and would suggest that the 
whole gang hire the Mechanics' Pavilion and make a night of it. If the 
Marquis of Queensbury rules were the conditions, twenty brace of these 
sluggers could put each other through in about five hours, and the fun 
would be worth paying for. But the leading advantage would be that we 
should escape such a lot of slugging literature ; for it could all come at 
once, instead of being doled out as at present, dolefully, from day to day. 

Rowing. — Home matters are very quiet. The Golden State barge 
race is not yet formally announced. Hanlan, Clifford and Beach appear 
to be mixing things up pretty freely in Sydney. The only race to bet on 
now is between the ex-champion and Clifford, on February 5th. The re- 
Bult of that contest may change the face of the other matches most ma- 
terially. 

Duck-Shooting. — The sport continues poor, and the supplies sent to 
market recently are from distant points. The first notice we have of an 
improvement we shall at once inform our readers of the locality. 



Baseball. The schedule aT frames to he played by the four olnbs in- 
cluded in the California Lesgue, has been arranged. The soft eon 
of the ground prevented the first match being played hut Sunday. It 
everything is tit, the first match of the season will tak<- place to-morrow 
at the Central Park, the Ssverlyfl and Sun Francisco Nine* opening the 
ball. 



Every retail grocer, who is not either lazy or lacking in intelligence, 
Dan now supply his .-oxtomers with a deUoioae article of 'IVn, fresh i 

liv himself, .Hid which possesses the fall aroma ami flavor ol the berk 
Richards, Harrison & Sherwood's Automatic Tea Kirer has prodnoed this 
result, and every grocer must have one in order to maintain his position, 

London and Liverpool.— On the 7th inst. four ships arrived from the 
above two ports, also one from Glasgow: The Dunnotar Oatt'e, L27 days 
from London; City of Madras, loo days from Liverpool, sbiu Berwick 

Liw, 111) days from London, and the Br. ship Cockermuulh, 137 days from 
Glasgow. They all brought Coal and General Merchandise. 



Hawaii. — The Oceanic steamship Alimo.it, 7 days from Honolulu, 
brought for cargo 20.000 pkgs. Sugar, 550 bags Rice, 3,283 bunohi I 
nanas, etc.; also, in Treasure, $38,886 73. Brig Chins Sprcckt'x. 1 4 .'. days 
from same, brought for cargo 5,300 bags Sugar and 1,000 bags Rice? 

Finest Frozen Oysters, fat, fresh and juicy, 50 cents and 75 cents p»r 
tiu, at C. Toohey's, 004 Market street, opposite New Montgomery. 

The new Photograph Gallery of Williams & Norton, 914 Market 
street, bet. Powell and Stockton, use only the San Francisco Dry Plate. 



BALDWIN THEATRE. 

THIRD OPEHA WEEK BEGINS JANUARY 12th 

EMMA. ABBOTT OPE ".A COMPANY! 

First Presentation in Ban Francisco of the Authorized Version of Lecocq's Sparkling 
Comic Opera, 

HEART AND HAND! 

In which ABBOTT, ANNANDALE, HINDLE, GRIFFITH, CASTLE, FABRINI, 
TAGLIAPIKTRA, ALLEN, BROUERICK, GUISE and Entire Co. will appear. 



Wednesday, Jan. 14. 



Popular Matineee- 
S1ARITANA. 



Saturday Afternoon 



EMMA ABBOTT 
MATINEE. 
In Preparation— Gilbert & Sullivan's IOLANTHE. 



Saturday Night . 

Last Time of — 
FAUST. 

Jan. 10. 



BUSH-STREET THEATRE. 

Mn. M. B. LEAVITT. Lessee and Manager | Ma. JAY RIAL Acting Manager 

A Popular Success! The Old-Time Favorite Comediau, 
MR. BEN COTTON 1 
Supported by bis Talented Daughter, IDALENE COTTON, and Full Dramatic Com- 
pany, in the Reautiful Comedy Drama, 

TRUE DEVOTION! 

&W During the play BEN and IDALENE COTTON will introduce their SONGS, 
DANCES and BANJO SOLOS! 
Matinee, Saturday, 2 p. m. Popular Prices. Jan. 10. 

CALIFORNIA THEATRE. 

WM. EMERSON.... Lessee and Manager 

The Most Popular Prices Rule: 
Gallery, lfie. Family Circle, 25c. A Reserved Seat in Dress Circle or Orchestra, 50e. 

BIO HIT OF 

EITERSON'3 Gr.fiAzi COMPANY! 

25c. P pular Matinee. lb ■„ Saturday, at 2 r. M. Nothing extra to reserve. 

Mjnday Niirht, Ja-i 1:2th -MUU)OON'S PICNIC, as produced at Niblo's Garden, 
New York. lydlld.ii, Haluy air! Ctllan.T'ie Liuctric Three playing their original 
parts. First i-pin-aiunm: <.*' i.w iJ Helcne. Grotesque Artists. Jan, 111, 

TIV0LI OPERA HOUSE. 

Eddy street, near Market.— K relink Bros., Sole Proprietors 
and Managers. — Last Nights of the Beautiful Operatic Spectacle, 

Prince North Pole! 

Magnificent Scenery and Costumes! Elegant Transformations! Beautiful Music 
and Effects! Excellent Cast and Chorus! THE JULIANS in Acrobatic Feats, etc. 
Next Week— HEART AND HAND. 
Admission, 25 cents, Reserved Seats, 60 cents. Jan. 10. 

THE GRAND PACIFIC RINK, 

Cor. Sutter and Jones Sts. 
FINEST AND LARGEST SK VT1NG FLOOR ON THIS COAST! 

JOHN B. KEYES, Proprietor. 

"Teitska Institute, 

NO. 922 POST STREET. 

ijlreuclt, German ami I2ll;ttl .u Day and Boardliigr-Scfaool for 
1 Young Ladies and Children, with KINDERGARTEN. 
Term commenced October 3d, 18S4. Address MME. B. ZEITSKA, 
[Sept. 27.1 Principal. 

J. TOMKINSON'S LIVERY AND SALE STABLE, 

Nos. 57, 59 aud 61 Minna street, 

Bet. First aud Second, San Francisco One Block from Palace Hotel. 
A'so Carriages and Cabs at Pacific Club, No. 130 Post street; also Northeast Corner 
Mon gomery and Bush streets. Vehicles of Even* Description at Redaced Rates. 
Tt LEPHONE No. 153. July 20. 

MISS M. B. BELANG-ER, 

Dressmaking Parlors and Pattern Rooms, 

Central Block -Entrance 14 Dupont Street, San Francisco. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Jan. 10, 1885. 



WORLD, FLESH AND DEVIL. 



[By a Truthful Penman] 



A couple, of tbe name of A. J. Bennett and Orpah T. Grubb, belong- 
ing to Preaton, England— being nephew and aunt — trave'e I 3,000 miles 
to Milwaukee in order to be married, which ceremony waB performed by 
a < 'oritf relational minister at the house of a relation on Nov. 30th. A 
letter from Milwaukee, dated Dec. 1st, -says that Mr. Bennett, who is a 
rich man, had traveled all that distance to " overcome the English mar- 
riage prescription relative to that kinship which induced them to cross 
i he ueean to nave the ceremony performed. The dusty volumes of law 
in France, Belgium, Switzerland, Germany, and other European coun- 
tries were examined by Mr. Bennett, but the marriage was forbidden in 
nil those countries. After a good deal of correspondence with the Ameri- 
can Consul, Mr. Bennett found that in the law of Wisconsin there was 
no clause forbidding such a marriage, and as Mrs. Grubb had a brother 
on the west side of Milwaukee they went there to have the knot tied. 
' Hut will you not experience trouble when you return to England?' Mr. 
I'.tfiineU was asked. ' My dear Bir,' he replied, ' trust me ; I took care to 
look into that. I am an expert on marriage laws in all the countries of 
the globe. I made it my special study for months.' " 

At a recent dinner-party the coachman had come in to help wait at 
table. Among the guests was a very deaf old lady. Coachman, in hand- 
ing vegetables, comes to .the deaf party : "Peas, mum ?" says Jehu. No 
answer. "Peas, mum?" (louder). Still no answer from the D. P., but 
placing her ear-trumpet to her ear, lifts it interrogatively to the man, 
who, glancing down and Beeing the tube, ejaculates : " Well, it's a rum 
way of taking them, but I suppose she likes it. Here goes 1 " and down 
went the peas into the ear-trumpet. 

Another Saint will soon be added to the Catholic calendar. The 
Preparatory Congregation, C. J., recently held a meeting at the Vatican, 
with Cardinal Bartolini as President, to decide on the heroical quality 
of the virtues of Jeanne de Lestonac. This lady belonged ti one of the 
most illustrious families of France. On the death of her husband, Baron 
de Montferrand, she retired into a convent at Toulouse, and there founded 
the religious order of Les Filles-de-Marie. She died at the age of 84. 

A very comfortable article has been imported from Japan, for the 
lining of ladies' cloaks, dressing- gowDS, etc. It consists of silk wadding, 
manufactured from the unspun threads of the silk cocoons. It is made 
in pieces about a yard square, and is sold at about six shillings the piece. 
It is expected that this light, warm lining will supersede the universal 
eiderdown as a lining. It is more easily applied and is less clumsy in 
form. — Court Circular. 

Statistics show that the wheat trade of California, Oregon and Wash- 
ington Territory, with Europe, gives employment annually to more than 
400 sailing vessels going around Cape Horn. The average passage of each 
vessel is about 10,000 miles in an average time of a little over four months. 
Of the 440 vessels thus employed in 1883, 330 bore foreigD flags, and the 
remainder the flag of the United States. 

A wealthy Irish farmer, intending to " send his son to college," re- 
cently wrote a short letter to the heads of Oxford University, in which 
heeaid: " Please say what are your terms for a year, and will it cost 
anything extra if my son learns to write a good hand and spell proper, 
as well as to row a boat ? " — Court Journal. 

The export of Japanese folding screens increased from GOO, in 1S74, to 
9,000, during the first ten months of the last year, while at the same time 
their quality has so deteriorated that the average price is only 2.50 yen, 
instead of 5 yen. A movement is on foot to introduce improvements in 
the method of manufacture and the material employed. 

It Is reported in London that tbe Hon. Abram S. Hewitt, of New 
York, will probably be the successor of Minister Lowell. The Pall Mall 
Gazette says that Mr. Hewitt's eminent position as a philanthropist, and 
his Free Trade views, tit him for the position, but whoever comes to 
England will find Mr. Lowell a very difficult man to succeed. 

The Sultan is going to have a large photograph album made, which is 
to contain, first, the phizes " of the ladies of the harem, many of whom 
are reported to be strangers to him at present; next, all his household 
employes of a superior order ; then the servants and workmen ; finally, 
bis chief ministeri of State and their clerks. The order is Oriental. 

A measure, which its advocates believe will greatly aid the American 
export trade, is to be introduced in Congress during the present session, 
in the shape of a bill to permit American Consuls to engage in mercantile 
pursuits in the posts to which they are 'sent, and to encourage the ap- 
pointmeut of merchants to Consular positions. 

The London Chamber of Commerce has now 1,853 members, viz : 
1,637 single subscribers, Q& firms of two or more partners, and 220 life 
members. Eleven special trade sections have been forffied up to the 
present, and others are being organized, particularly with a view to the 
representation of colonial trade interests. 

The old Freedman's Bank still owes nearly §1,000,000, but so many 
of the pass-books have been bought by speculators, or lost, that probably 
if the Government should adopt the Controller's suggestion, and pay the 
money, not over one-tenth of the sum would go to the original depositors. 

— Springfield Republican. 
There were 22,905 persons killed in India by snakes and wild beasts 
in 1883, as appears by a Government report. Of these, snakes killed 20,- 
067, tigers 985, wolves 2S7, and leopards 217. There were in the year 
47,478 cattle killed, but only 1,044 of them died from snake bites. 

An Umbrella Loan Society is to be established in Berlin. Branch 
offices will, it is asserted, be opened all over the city, where members can 
obtain umbrellas in case of a sudden shower. 

The Lima papers are calling upon the branflfe-of the London Bank of 
Mexico and South America, in that city, to tell them what has become of 
the proceeds of the church jewels sold through the agency of that Bank, 
in London, in 1881. 

Take the Haight-street or McAllister-street cable cars to Park with- 
out transfer. 



CHRISTMAS VIOLETS. 

Last night I found the violets 

You sent me once across tbe sea : 
From gardens that the Winter frets, 

In Summer lands they came to me. 
Still fragrant of the English earth, 

Still humid from the frozen dew. 
To me they spoke of Christmas mirth, 

They spoke of England, spoke of you. 
The flowers are scentless, black and sere. 

The perfume long has passed away; 
The sea, whose tides are year by year, 

Is Bet between us, chill and gray. 
But you have reached a windless age, 

Tbe haven of a happy clime; 
You do not dread the Winter's rage, 

Although we missed the Summer time. 
And like the flower's breath over Bea, 

Across the gulf of time and paio, 
Tonight returns the memory 

Of love that lived not all in vain. 

— Harper's Magazine for December, 

COST OF PRODUCING PIG IRON. 

The following comparative table of itemized cost of producing pig 
iron in various districts, given by the American Iron Neius, will be found 
interesting. The figures are per ton of pig iron made, and it will be 
noticed that the principal differences are in price of raw material. The 
labor is comparatively a small element in the higher daily wages paid 
here being counterbalanced by the greater efficiency of the workmen. 
The cost at Buffalo Gap, Virginia, is estimated, and the labor charge 
perhaps doubtful: 

Fuel Ore. Flux. Labor, wear Total, 

used. and tear, etc. 

Lehigh Valley $5.00 $8.00 .77 S3 25 $17.02 

Schuylkill Valley .... 4 33 11 35 .33 3 12 19.43 

Virginia 3.88 3 40 .50 3.25 11.03 

Pittsburg 3 00 10.00 .77 3.25 17.02 

Alabama 4.76 130 .80 2.81 9.76 

Middlesboro', Eng. ..$364 2.91 .60 1.G6 8 81 

Buffalo Gap, Va 375 3.75 1 00 2.00 10.50 

Going on a Journey. — There is nothing finer to take on a journey 
where a lunch basket is required than the canned Fruits, Pickles, Meats, 
etc., put up by the King-Morse Canning Company. 

Williams *S Norton, new Photograph Gallery, 914 Market street, be- 
tween Powell and Stockton, use the San Francisco Dry Plate exclusively. 

BANKS AND INSURANCE. 

(Organized 1S63.) 

FIREMAN'S FUND INSURANCE COMPANY. 

Fire and Marine Insurance. 
Assets 81.BOO.OOO | Losses paid over. .$5, OOO. OOO 

B®" The Largest Assets and Largest Income of all the Companies hailing from 
west of New York State, and writes more Premiums on the Pacific Coast than any 
other Company Local, Eastern or Foreign. 

U. J. STAPLES Prosidentl WM. J. DUTTON Secretary 

ALPHEUS BULL Vice-President | E. W. CARPENTER Asst. Secretary 

HOME OFFICII, 
SOUTHWEST COR. CALIFORNIA AND SANSOMCB STS., 

SAN FRANCISCO. 
Agents in all prominent localities. Sept. 13. 

PACIFIC DEPARTMENT 

LONDON AND LANCASHIRE FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY 

OF LIVERPOOL. 

Capital $9,260,000 

Cash Assets 2,764,875 

Cash Assets in United States 1,398,646 

BALFOVK, GUTHRIE <l CO., General Agents, 
March 20. 316 California Street, San Franoisco. 

BRITISH AND FOREIGN MARINE INS. CO. OF LIVERPOOL. 



Capital 95, OOO a 00O. ---Agents: Balfour, Gnthrle A Co., No. 
/ 816 California street, San Francisco. Nov. 18. 



Oharles Orocker. E, 0. "Wool-worth, Wm. H, Orocker 

CROCKER, W00LW0RTH & CO., 

BANKERS, 

322 PINE STREET SAN FRANCISCO. 

flarry oa a Qeueral Ranking 1 Business. Correspondents 

V-/ in the principal cities of the Eastern States and in Europe. June 16. 

SECURITY SAVINGS BANK. 

GUARANTEE CAPITAL, 

Officers: Tire-President. Jerome Lincoln 
S. Jones ; Attorney, Sidney V. Smith. 
Approved Securities. 



9300,000. 
, Secretary, W. 

Loans made on Real Estate and other 
Office: No. 216 Sansome street, San Francisco. Oct. 1. 



THE GERMAN SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 

Deutsche Spar and Lelbbank,No.526 California street, San 
Francisco. Officers : President, L. GOTTIG. Board of Directors. — L. 
I Gottig, Fred Roeding, Chas. Kohler, Edw. Kruse, George H. Eggcrp, N. Van Bergen, 
H. L. Simon, Peter Spreckeis, A. E. Heeht. Secretary, GEO. LETTE; Attorneys, 
JARBOE & HARRISON. May 18. 



Jan. 10, 16c5.' 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



SCIENTIFIC AND USEFUL. 

A VoJuablo Improvement. -An Improved plan f. >r tntttrdog -\i\ 
monda int. the ie<t'i ot boring, drilling, Mwlojr, grinding and other 
tnote. iiv vhiofa the ditunondd ere rigidly en 1 permanently wound in 
position withonl breolnj <>r soldering. nn<l nitaout any paeiibMity of 
their . i- I. U thfl Bubjeot of a recent American invention. 

k if the tool i-* provided with *>ne or more tranaverao recesses, of 
il«»« eta leil »h%|»**, th« sule^ of which c^nvergo »HKhtly towards the loti-ri- 
tndtnal i»\i* "f tho rocM*. Inserted in tho recede* ere the dmmnmK 
vhloh are sheped ftt two <>pp mite aidei bo as to correspond exactly to the 
shape and size of the rece--«. To obtain diamonds of the proper size, re- 
■ piirvd for the different fcnola, the raw di&mitadi ere broken up, which is 
.■ir.'.oupli-'if.i (>y makini; a slight incision with a diamond-cutting tool at 
the point whew the diamond should be separated, and then cleaving the 
stone in the line of the inciuOQ by a suitable tool. The diamonds are 
then cut into ship?, and inserted, with the narrower end foremost, into 
thfl I'it by the aid of li^-ht blown. The doublewed^e action of the receds 
holds the tapering base of the diamond rigidly in place. 

Tho Coming HetaX— The aluminium cap of the Washington Monu- 
ment has just been completed, its weight being 117 ora. It is believed 
that this marks the introduction into commerce of a metal as light as 
•rood. It is abetter conductor of electricity than silver wben alloyed 
with 90 per cent, of copper ; its strength is greater than Bteel; it is lus- 
trous in appearance, and proof against corrosion. The present cost of 
this metal is $1$ peroz., and, from all we hear, large contracts at this 
rate have been made in it. Mr. Frishrauth, who was a pupil of Herr 
Wohler, the discoverer of aluminium, has, after twenty-eight years* re- 
search, discovered a method of substituting some cheap carbon com- 
pounds of sodium for the costly metallic sodium which is so dangerous 
in the process of manufacture. He also announces the discovery of a 
solder called the Eraerson-Foote metal. 

A Now Use for Carbonic Acid.— The Germans are about to make a 
mnetremarkable practical application of an English invention. It is in- 
tended to raise the level of the whole line of th« railway along the right 
bank of the Rhine, ami for this purpose it is intended to lift the stone- 
built large station-houses bodily some seven or eight feet, by means of car- 
bonic acid pressure. The ordinary carbonic acid gas can, by means of 
machinery, be condensed 500 volumes into one, and then Btored and 
handled freely in cylinders of wrought iron. The pressure of the liquid 
is about 000 pounds to the square inch, at a temperature 32 degrees Fah- 
renheit; but by further heating, a pressure of 18,000 pounds to the square 
inch has been known to be obtained. Many purposes to which the inven- 
tion may be applied are suggested. 

A wonderful idea. — A project, which, if executed, would render the 
Paris Exhibition of 1889 forever memorable, has been published by M. 
Eiffel, the French engineer, and is described in Le Nature. It is to «rect 
on the ground* of the exhibition an iron tower 300 meters in hight, that 
is, twice as high as the Great Pyramid, and more than twice the hight of 
the Strasburg Cathedral ; 100 meters he considers as the limit of hight 
possible in a structure of which stone is the principal material, and hence 
iron is proposed. The base of the tower is of pyramidal shape, and is to 
be 70 meters in hight, and the superficial area at this higLt will be 5,000 
square meters ; above this there are to be three other stages, or stories, in 
which will be rooms which it is proposed to use for various purposes, sci- 
entific and otherwise. 

New, bat Feasible. — An exchange Btates that a cooking kitchen of 
some novelty has been shown. It is on wheels, and can easily be drawn 
by one horse or mule. It will cook rations of any kind in the field for a 
regiment, and will bake, boil or stew while on the line of march. Re- 
cently it was drawn by mules through the camp at Aldershot, England, 
while the dinner of the Leicestershire Regiment was being cooked in it. 
The experiments have been carried out under the immediate direction of 
Lieutenant-Colonel Sartorius, superintending officer of the cooking 
kitchen, and have given great satisfaction to the camp authorities, who 
will doubtless report favorably on it. 

New Method of Driving, — A new and ingenious method of driving 
has been invented by Mr. E. J. Murray, of York, which enables a man 
to keep bis bands in his pockets and guide his horse or horses with 
safety and accuracy. The driving is done with the feet instead of the 
hands. An ingenious apparatus is provided, which can be fitted in a few 
minutes to any vehicle, by which the reins are brought over a pulley, 
and worked by a sort of treadle. It can be used with or without the or- 
dinary reins, and may be controlled by a child. 

The Panama Canal. — The quantity of earth excavated in connection 
with the Panama Canal, in September, was 6,000,000 cubic metres. The 
aggregate extraction effected was thus carried to 8,465,000 cubic me- 
tres. A large quantity of additional machinery bas been received, and 
the excavation is now expected to proceed more rapidly. 

Coal In France. — According to M. Vuillemin, the consumption of 
coal in France in 18S2 was 31,015.000 tons. Of this total, iron works 
consumed 6,353,000 tons ; railways, 3,661,000 tons ; mines, 1,234,000 tons ; 
steamboats, 740,000 tons ; and miscellaneous industries and domestic heat- 
ing, 19,618,000 tons. 

Railways In Europe, -It is computed that there were 52,000 loco- 
motives upon the railways of Europe in 1882. The number of passengers 
carried during the year was 1,371,000,000, while the aggregate weight of 
goods carried was 715,000,000 tons. 

Gold in Ohio. —A Cincinnati miueralogist has gathered from several 
farms in Clermont Co., O., specimens of rock and earth, which yield 
$1,000 in gold to the ton. A company will be formed to buy the farms. 

J. W. Carmany, No. 25 Kearny street, is now offering for sale, at the 
lowest prices, a magnificent assortment of all the latest styles in Gents' 
Underwear and Furnishing Goods. 

R. Cutlar (Dentist), Room 104, Phelan's Building, third floor. 



INSURANCE. 



HUTCHINSON * MANN 
Fli-e and Murine Imsuranoo Ajgenoy, 

Nos. 322 and 324 California Stieot, San Francisco, Cal. 

Capital Represented $27,000, r 00 

All Lomte* Et/uitably Adjusted and Promptly Paid. 

PACIFIC DEPARTMENT 
THE FIRE INSURANCE ASSOCIATION OF LONDON. 

HUTCHINSON ft MANN Mana gers | W. L. CHALMERS. .Special and Adjuster 

HOME MUTUAL INSURANCE COMPANY, OF CALIFORNIA. 

Organized 1864. 
Principal Offioe 216 Sansomo street. 

FIRE IKNDRANCE. 

Capital Paid TJp In XT. S. Gold Coin) $300,000 00 

Reinsurance Reserve $200,059 76 

Assets January l, 1834 d7fi0.47o.T3 | Premlum8,8lnceorgaul»t'o W.5'1,827 W 

Surplus for policyholders... $762,01X1.73 Losses, since organisation.. S1.072.O9S 10 
Not Surplus (ovor everything) $;&2,03ti9S | 

OFFICERS * 

J. F. HOUGHTON President I CIlAs! R. STORY Secretary 

J. L. N. SHKPARD Vice-President | R. H. MAGILL General Agent 

Directors of tiir Homk Mutual Insurance Co.— L L. Raker, H. L. Dodge, J. 
L. N. Shepard, JohnCurrey.J. F. Houghton, John Sinclair, C. Wutcr house, Chauneey 
Taylor, 3. Hu ff, J. S. Ca rter, H. P. Coon. April 13. 

SOUTH BRITISH AND NATIONAL FIRE AND MARINE INS. CO. 

Capital, S20.0OO.0OO. 

Unlimited Liability of Shareholders. 

THE CITY OF LONDON FIRE INSURANCE CO. 

Capital. 510,000,000- 

THE STANDARD MARINE INSURANCE CO., LIMITED, 

Of Liverpool. Capital, $5,000,000- 

W J. IAI.LINGII AM .1- CO., General Agents, 

213-21. r i Sansomo Stroot 
It. If. Slisro.v. M .linger City Department. 

UNION INSURANCE COMPANY OF SAN FRANCISCO. 

PRINCIPAL OFFICE 416 CALIFORNIA STREET. 

(CALIFORNIA LLOYDS.) 

Capital 9730,000 | Assets Over 81,000,000 

The Leading: Fire and Marine Insurance Co. of California. 



JAS. D. BAILEY 

C. P. FAKNFIELD... 



Secretary I OUSTAVE TOUCHARD President 

..General Apeut | N. G. KITTLE Vice-President 

GEO. T. BUHEN, Surveyor. 



A JOINT POLICY ISSUED BY THE FOUR COMPANIES. 

Imperial Fire Insurance Co , of London Instituted 1803. 

London Assurance Corporation, of London 

Established by Royal Charter 1720. 

Northern Assurance Corporation, of London Established 1836. 

Queen Insurance Company, of Liverpool Established 1857. 

ROBERT DICKSON, Manager, 
S.E. Cor. California and Montgomery Sts. , Safe Deposit Building-. 

PHOENIX ASSURANCE COMPANY 

Of London, England, Estab'd 1782. -Cash Assets, $5,266,372.35 

BRITISH AMERICA ASSURANCE COMPANY 

Of Toronto, CaYlada, Estab'd 1833. -Cash Assets, $1,343,908.54 

WESTERN ASSURANCE COMPANY 

Of Toronto, Canada, Estab'd 1851 —Cash Assets, $1,357,326.39 

SUTLER * IIALRAN, 

General Agents for Pacific Coast, 

405 California Street San Francisco. 

THE SWISS MARINE INS. COMPANIES COMBINED. 

Switzerland, oYKnrich, Capital 5,000,000 franca; Helvetia* 
of St. Gall, Capital 10,000,000 francs ; Baloise, of Basle, Capital 5,000,000 francs. 
These three Companies are liable jointly and severally for all losses that may be sua- 
ained. Losses made payable in all the principal seaports of the world. In the set- 
tlement of all claims under an English policy, these Companies willstrictly adhere to 
the conditions and customB adopted at Lloyds, and submit to English jurisdiction. 
Juno 9. HARRY W. SYZ, Agent, 420 and 422 California st,, S. F. 

THAMES AND MERSEY MARINE INSURANCE COMPANY 

(Limited), of Liverpool, London and Manchester. 

CAPITA! SUBSCRIBED $10,000,000 

Capital paid up 1,000,000 

Reserve Fund (In addition to capital) 1,875,000 

Total Assets June 30, 1S83 5,3X2,719 

WM. GREER HARRISON, Manager, 

[July 10.] 308 Pine street, San Francisoo. 

NATIONAL ASSURANCE COMPANY OF IRELAND. 

[ESTABLISHED A. D. 1822.] 
Authorized Capital.$10,000,000 | Subscribed Capital... $5,000,000 

H. M- NEWHALL & CO., 

General Agents for the Pacific Coast. 

Office— 309 Sausoine street, San Francisco. 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Jan. 10, 1885. 



EX-GOV. STANFORD FOR SENATOR. 
The Legislature of this State, which assembled at Sacramento on 
last Monday, is not yet, owing to the factious action of that element of 
the Democratic Senators known as the "radicals, organized according 
to Parliamentary rules, and it may take some little time before the or- 
conization is accomplished. Tbe fact, however, of the members being 
Till gathered together, even though in that chaotic state which precludes 
action, enables one to survey the held and form a pretty correct opinion 
as to the probable outcome of the Senatorial contest. For the high 
honor of representing California in the United States Senate there are 
three candidates-M. M. Estee, A. A. Sargent and George C. Perkins. 
The tirst of these three has so long and so assiduously allied him.elt 
with dema»ogism that ore could scarcely have patience to regard him in 
the light of a candidate, if it were not for the fact that be stands no 
chance of election. He has a small personal following which will stick 
to him as long as he wants it, but which stands no chance of increasing. 
Sar»ent and Perkins are both gentlemen of the highest personal and po 
litical standing, and either of them would fill the position right worthily. 
Both of them" have considerable of a following, which may either in- 
crease or diminish, and it is upon this prospective increase or diminution 
that the contest binges. 'J he present indications point to a dead-lock 
between the two, and as it is a political impossibility for any considera- 
ble number of the votes of either to go over to Estee, it is necessary to 
look outside the present aspirants for a suitable gentleman to occupy 
this distinguished position. A glance around the State at the available 
men, must result in pointing directly to one man, and he. it may be said, 
without any disparagement to the others, towers head and shoulders away 
above anv of those whose names have been mentioned or can be men- 
tioned. We refer to ex-Governor Leland Stanford. It is not going too 
far to say that be would adorn the position and reflect credit on the con- 
stituency which selected him. 

Ex Governor Stanford is a gentleman of ripe judgment and wide ex- 
perience. He was carefully educated in youth, and throughout life he 
has been zealously storing his mind with that useful erudition which is 
always acquired outside of college walls, and without which technical 
training in tbe scholastic arts is of little practical value. He has had a 
long business experience- -principally acquired in California— with all 
that wealth of knowledge of men and affairs which springs from it; and 
as the leader of that little band of daring and clear-headed men who 
girded the great American continent with rails, he has already acquired 
international fame. 

Ex-Governor Stanford has always taken that lively interest in public 
an" drs which is the duty of every good citizen, but, although he has held, 
with credit to himself and honor to the community, the office of Governor 
of California, he is in no sense a politician. He is a statesman, rather ; 
one who can look over the heads of cabals, and away beyond party lines, 
out at the real requirements and wishes of the people ; one who can dis- 
tinguish between a genuine public sentiment and the fictitious clamor of 
a few noisy demagogues. Another advantage possessed by the Governor 
is his large wealth— the result of long years of patient and successful 
work. This places bim in a position where he has nothing tostruggle for 
except honor and hoppiness — the honor and happiness of serving well and 
adding to tbe prosperity of his commonwealth and his country. Inthis 
respect he is different from many of those who have made public life a 
profession or semi-profession ; who, in the ceaseless traffic and barter of 
official favors, find little time to pay attention to the public requirements, 
and who under no circumstances would dare to turn an antagonistic face 
towards those temporary abberations which sometimes pass over the 
public intellect. In this respect ex-Governor Stanford's qualifications are 
worthy of the most serious consideration, because they especially tit bim 
for public station at a time when the reform spirit is abroad in the land, 
and when an effort is being made to raise our representative institutions 
above the level of huckstering in "patronage." 

That ex-Governor Stanford is an intensely popular man, and that the 
great mass of the people of this State would be rejoiced to see bim as 
one of their Senatorial representatives, does not admit of a doubt. The 
expectation of a dead-lock springing out of the coming trial of strength 
between the present aspirants has, within the past two or three days, 
caused a great deal of discussion as to a suitable outside man; and out of that 
discussion an extraordinary sentiment in favor of ex-Governor Stanford 
has grown. At first it was a mere mention* now it is a positive de- 
mand. Even the " radical " press is in favor of him. The three as- 
pirants who are now in tbe field would, therefore, be doing a dignified 
and graceful act by hearkening to the public voice and withdrawing in 
favor of | the people's choice. Governor Stanford is not in the field as 
a candidate ; that is, he will enter into no struggle or scramble for the 
place, but if the people of California, through their representatives, 
offer it to him, we are well persuaded that he will not decline the 
honor or betray the trust its acceptance involves. 

WANTED— A MUSEUM. 
A movement, looking toward the establishment, in this city, of a first- 
class puhlic museum, is at the present time being quietly discussed in 
private circles. The proposal is one which is worthy of enthusiastic sup- 
port, and it is entirely feasible. Just now the principal element of suc- 
cess which it seems to lack is the energetic leadership of one or two gen- 
tlemen of prominence and influence. With such a support the success of 
the scheme would seem to be almost assured. Almost all that is wanted 
in order to establish such an institution on broad, deep foundations is a 
building and the yearly cost of maintenance. There are several very val- 
uable private collections in this City and State, which, it is known, would 
readily be donated to a genuine and properly-conducted public museum. 
There are also several collections which would be sold for a comparative 
trifle, upon the understanding that they would go to swell a great public 
collection. The Academy of Sciences has also quite a museum itself, 
which, in its present location, is almost useless. There can be no doubt, 
therefore, but that the Academy would gladly place its treasures where 
they would be useful. The State's collection of minerals, too, could be 
taken from the hole in which they are now bidden away and placed on 
exhibition. All these elements, when put together, would result in a 
museum of imposing dimensions and appearance. Besides, it would be 
a growing institution. 



U. S. GRANT. 
No private citizen has been talked about so much recently as U. S. 
Grant. His unfortunate connection with the late banking and brokerage 
firm of Grant & Ward has aroused for him national sympathy. There 
can be no doubt that he is, in a financial sense, in a broken-up condition. 
Many efforts are being made, and many schemes proposed, for the pur- 
pose of placing General Grant in a position which will secure him against 
the pangs of poverty. We think some of these movements are premature, 
and, as we understand the matter, what is known as tbe New York Times 
Fund is almost a certain security for the General's peace of mind. As 
to tbe suit instituted by Vanderbilt, and the result, that is purely a busi- 
ness affair, and Grant, like any other citizen, must abide by the decision 
of the courts. There should not, in this especial instance, be a particle of 
sympathy for the defendant. In the losses of the firm of which General 
Grant was a silent partner, he must bear his share as rationally, if not ai 
joyfully, as he would have borne the profits, were there any profits. The 
public mind seems to be in a f g with regard to the financial condition of 
the man who was once the first soldier and citizen of the Republic. It is 
not as bad, we are certain, as it is represented to be, and if it were, why 
then General Grant has only been subject to the ups and downs which is 
the fate of man, and which has been the lot of thousands as illustrious as 
he has been. These he will, no doubt, bear like a man. for all the sages 
agree in asserting that misfortune, and not fame, is tbe real test of man- 
hood. It is certain that General Grant is so situated that he cannot come 
to actual want, and if the worst comes to the worst, it will be found in 
bis case that Republics are not ungrateful to their great and illustrious 
citizens. An examination of the career and history of this remarkable 
man shows only one serious flaw in it, and that is. or was, his attempt to 
violate a tradition of the Republic as fixed and inviolate as Constitutional 
law, when be sought, through peculiar agencies, to secure his election as 
President of the United States for a third term. That was Grant's real 
misfortune, besides which all bis troubles sink into insignificance. Such 
will be the verdict of history. That step will not be forgotten, and should 
not be ; it is a warning to the future citizen who may be elected to the 
highest gift in the will of tbe people, that he must not, powerful though 
he may think himself to be, attempt to trample upon the traditions of the 
people. We should remember the deep and inner meaning of all theBe 
things, and though we may be citizens in humble and lowly life, it is our 
Bacred duty to watch with jealous care the motives and actions of our 
public servants. We should guard against indiscriminate hero worship, 
and, with malice toward none, render unto Caesar ti.at, and that only, 
which rightfully belongs to him. 

ANOTHER CASE IN POINT. 
Another case has just occurred which illustrates to a dot the utter 
impotence of our system of administering criminal justice. Some time 
back a young man named Ingram made a murderous assault with a pistol 
upon Supervisor Abbott. The wicked deed was premeditated for days 
before, and that it did not result fatally was owing to faulty execution 
rather' than any absence of crimiea! or wicked intent. Not very long 
a»o, under the English system of law, from which ours is derived, Buch 
an attempt on life was regarded as equivalent to murder, and was pun- 
ishable with death. A more lenient idea prevails now, but still the crime, 
and very properly so, too, iB regarded as a most seriousone and punisha- 
ble by a long term of imprisonment. Tbe case under discussion was tried 
before Jud"e Toohy, who has gained distinction from the fact that he is 
about the only one of our JudgeB who seems to realize that his duty is to 
punish rather than protect criminals. The evidence was clear and con- 
clusive; there was no doubt upon any point. Yet, in the face of all this, 
the twe'lve mutton-heads, or scoundrels— and it is an open question which 
title is the appropriate one— found the accused guilty of a simple assault. 
Luckily the case was tried by an earnest Judge, who gave the prisoner 
the full penalty the law allows— but as that is only three months impris- 
onment—a substantial miscarriage of justice has occurred. If this was 
an isolated case, it might be let pass. But it is not an isolated case. It 
is a fair specimen of the ordinary administration of criminal justice in 
our courts. As a rule, either the Judge or the jury makes a mistake, 
and when, by accident, neither of those elements in criminai procedure 
manage to err on " the side of mercy," the Supreme Court comes to the 
rescue of the poor criminal. It is idle to belabor individuals for their ac- 
tions in any one case. What is necessary is to look at the whole ques- 
tion, in its bearing upon organized society generally, and to ask if some- 
thing cannot be done to amend a glaringly imperfect system ? It is surely 
time for action, 

WELLS. FARGO & COMPANY. 
With this number of the News Letter we present in detail to our 
readers Wells, Fargo & Company's annual statement of the precious 
metals produced in the United States and Territories during the past 
twelve months. In addition to the usual features and information 
contained in the report— which, by the way, is now accepted in all 
financial and mining circles as one of the most reliable authorities extant 
upon the subject— there is also shown, upon the opposite page, tbo 
mineral product of Mexico for the past seven years, and the coinage of 
the Mint for the past twelve years; also, the aggregated coinage of Mexi- 
co, from the establishment of mints in 1537 to December 31, 1884, show- 
in" during the several epochs of Colonial Dependency, Independency, 
and Republicanism, a grand total of 83,234,131,847. In view of the 
lar^e and rapidly growing commercial relations between the United 
States of America and the United States of Mexico, this information is 
of special interest at this juncture, and Wells, Fargo & Co., with their 
usual discernment, have done the commercial public a great service by 
"athering this information, as we think we are doing by disseminating it. 
Speaking of the enterprise of Wells, Fargo & Co., by the way, reminds 
us that the growth of this company is perfectly phenomenal. Its lines 
now aggregate 35.000 miles, extending through tbirty-two States and 
Territories, including the Central and Pacific Coast States of Me :- 
ico, and its agencies number no less than fourteen hundred. The 
peoole of Mexico are to be congratulated upon the fact that this old and 
always reliable company has stretched out its network of agencies into 
their territory, because it assures them of an Express service which, f >r 
efficiency and trustworthiness, cannot be surpassed in the known world. 



Jan 10, 188?. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERT IS hi;. 



II 



TOWN CRIER. 



• Hear th 

*Oik- Hut will pi 



"What the tluvll an 
th. dovll, sir, with VOO." 



"He'd i sthtg in his tail u long as ■ Sal), 
Which mad! I I bolder." 



The literature or tho law is, indeed, » marvel of tautology. The 
ordinary newspaper Krlbe is accustomed to stating facts in the three- 
j.t k* of « lamb's tail style; bat the lawyer, in setting forth his state- 
Labon under the idea that he must ynlp in every vagrant word in 
tbulary In order to make nte meaning intelligible to the cobwebbed 
intellects of the bench. To illustrate: A aog is run over by ft street-car 
and killed. The newspaper man would describe the occurrence about as 
follows: "An unfortunate canine was yesterday run over by car No. 3 
of the Slow Horse line aud killed.'' The hrief-writer, if called upon to 
narrate the tale, would bellow about as follows: " This deponent, being 
first duly sworn, deposes and says that on, near, about or at the time, 
boor, o'clock and minute of the two post meridian of the seventh day of 
January, anno domini eighteen hundred and eighty five, said day being 
Wednesday, oue certain creature, animal or living thing, described more 
particularly as follows, namely, to- wit: a yellow skinned or haired dog, 
said oreatore, animal, living thing or dog being vagrant, wandering and 
pon the street or highway, was at said time aforementioned, upon 
the day and date hereinbefore stated, accidentally, unintentionally and 
unavoidably run over, thrown down, squeezed, squelched and suffocated 
t<> death and demise by one certain vehicle, carriage, conveyance, omni- 
Ins and car, said car being and now at this time being the property, 
goods, chattels, b-longings and appurtenances of the street, highway or 
public road company or association known and being known as the Slow 
Horse line; and uVpi-ment further saith that by reason of said squeezing, 
squelching, suffocating and killing, said canine, animal, pup or dog is at 
the present moment, it being now ten o'clock, unable or disqualified to 
bark, growl, smell, scratch or wag his tail as doubtless he would be glad, 
anxious and willing to do if he could." Nothing like saying all there is 
to be said on a subject. These thoughts are inspired by the so called 
replication of a famous defendant in <* celebrated case published in the 
daily paptrs last Sunday. 

The Town Crier begs to inform the public of San Francisco that he 
has now on exhibition his world-renowned collection of "Immortal Stiffs," 
th result of twenty-five years' research. (N. B. — The T. C. guarantees 
that ; he has been in the stiff-collecting business for that length of time. 
No trouble to show guarantees. If anybody insists upon thirty years' ex- 
perience, the T, 0, is prepared to accommodate thon. " Thon " is a new 
word*- a contraction of " that one" — and signifies either the masculine or 
feminine gender, singular or plural number, eats without knife or fork, 
and sleeps with one eye open). The T. C.'a collection embraces many 
well known characters, each possessing a peculiar personality which con- 
stitutes him in and of himself "a thing of beauty and a joy forever." 
The price of admission to this great show is the small sum of a dime. 
Mutilated or foreign coins not taken, and transfers only given and re- 
ceived at the intersection of get-off and get-on streets. 

First upon the list is the distinguished humorist and casual clown. Low 
Ring Bickring, author of "Sweet Violets." (If the hen which laid these 
eggs in such jellified confusion upon the stage will please cackle, she shall 
have an omelet for her trouble). Mr. Bickring has enriched the field of 
literature with many rare gems of humor. He is the originator of the 
famous couplet : 

" The bucket fell down the well-sweep, 
And dad pulled it up again— sheep," 

a poetic scintillation which abounds in humor, bristles with facts and 
fairly grunts with rhythm and rhyme. In graveyard lyrics, Mr. B. has 
no equal. His celebrated " Lines to Dead Tommy " will dwell long in 
the memory of those who believe that the dear departed should be poet- 
ized. As a delineator of the virtues of mortified mankind, Mr. Bickring 
stands without a peer. 

Next we have Amber Rose Beers, distinguished both as a poet and as 
a promiscuity. (Note— For the definition of " promiscuity," see the 
" Devil's Dictionary," Beers author). Mr. Beers will now sing his tear- 
distillery ballad, entitled, " Heaven Help the Devil When I Sit on Top 
o' Him:" 

" Oh ! I'm flabbergasted and flipgibbeted; 

I'm catalogued and I'm exhibited; 

I'm poster -plastered and I'm fame-ified. 

But I'm neither paralyzed nor shame-ified ! 

So I sing, and as I yawp I gather vim: 

' Heaven help the Devil when I sit on top o' him !'" 

Should the audience feel moved to give Mr. Beers an encore, they will 
please retire to the woodshed, where they will find a supply of clubs. 
Those who sympathize with the Devil can, at leisure, hunt up the ob- 
ject of their pity. 

Here we have Parson Bottle It, the greatest and only iron skull editori- 
alist whom the world has ever produced. (Caution — As the world is get- 
ting old, and her husband is dead, there is ground for hope that she will 
never produce another. The audience will please refrain from ejaculat- 
ing "Amen! " in any but the English language). Mr. Bottle It is chiefly 
distinguished for the depths of his opinions, which are beyond the ken of 
mundane man, but are supposed to be nuts for the inhabitants of Jupiter, 
in which planet the parson's paper has a large and growing circulation. 

Your special attention is called to the next figure, Crank Pick Slay, the 
giant who slew his mule to shield himself from them asses; conqueror of 
the Vatican and annihilator of the Hotel de Consistency, upon the ruins 
of which he builded the Inn Consistency. Mr. P. Slay has the Pope's 
toe preserved in brandy, and has frequently accomplished the difficult 
feat of drinking the brandy without kissing the toe. People who may 
become stuck on Mr. Pick Slay are respectfully informed that he is fo 
Bale — price, ten cents. 

Next in order is Gee Whoa Toiler, the blustering barrister, who never 
drinks before the bar, unless invited. (Advertisement — G. W. is the 
originator of the great hi-diddle-diddleconnundrum: " Why can no mule's 



oheek outooeasure mine?" The answer to which ir-: " Because the mule 
is dead Beared to be measured)." Mr. Toller is uninteresting unless mod. 

Af present he id in n g 1 h r. 

Von see b.-re Claw Rente Greatcnbin, Coroner of Bonrbonburg. It 
was daring Coroner Greatcabln's ad ministration that the English Ian- 
irdered. lie had the distinguished honor of sitting on the 
rem una, 

DeaCOQ Pitei discoverer of Lager Beer. (P. S. — If the deacon did not 
discover beer, it will always be BQBpeoted that he wanted to, which ll 
the same thing in a different pair of pants). Mr. Kits dresses like an 
ordinary man. this beiDg quite a concession on hi* part, as it is the gen- 
eral opinion that In- belongs to another sphere than this. 

Please Man Can Sell— Not very handsome, but oh ! so fut ! It will do 
yon good to take a tapeline and measure him. Captain Can Sell wilt 
undertake to hold himself out at arm's length. Should he fail in the 
act, he will gracefully take a tumble. 

Doct Her Hoe Down All. a self-made man. {Explanatory Note- 
When the Doct Her made himself he was only an apprentice at the 
business). He will now recite his wonderful poem, " I'm a Morgue ami 
Attic Man," in which he uckhowledgeB no superior : 

" I'm a morgue and attic man, undertaker, undertaker ; 
I have met with great succets as a fakir, as a fakir ; 
Such triumphs have been showered on my devoted head 
That the people have commissioned me to sit upon the dead, 
and, as there is considerable coin in the business, I have consented 
to sit." 

Persons who may be killed by this recital will be buried by the Doct 
Her at $4 a head- -six bits les* than list price. 

Our next curiosity is Jawg Marbleman, who has been Gov. for over a 
year, drunk or sober. He will sing : 

" My cigarette, can I forget 

How Oath and I, in sunny weather, 
Sat in the shade the State House made 

And rolled and smoked the weed together? " 
This curious creature on the left is See See Buckle Lee, the good shep- 
herd who fleeces the public to clothe his lambs. Being blind. Mr. Buckle 
Lee's front name sounds sarcastic; but what he lacks in eyesight he more 
than makes up in earsight, by a darn sight. With Mr. Buckle Lee we 
close the performance. 

About his " stiffs," the present week. 
The Town Crier will no longer speak ; 
But, winking with his larboard ear, 
Wishes you all a prosperous year. 
Two hideous shapes of stone, alleged to be the petrified remains of 
a man and a woman, are now on exhibition in this city. Whether these 
monstrosities are or are not the mineralized images of the male and 
the female humans, is not a question which clamors for discussion. The 
idiocy of bringing such goods to San Francisco with the expectation of 
gathering ducats from the public by tbeir exhibition is more fitting of 
mooting. A people that has been accustomed, day after day, to con- 
template the cast-iron cheek of mashers, peddlers and itinerant and 
stationary beggars, is not likely to be aroused to a paroxysm of curiosity 
by remains either petrified or putrified. Take the stone dead to the 
World's Fair without delay. 

An individual, who evidently has faith in the "weight of human 
endeavor," has been advertising in a daily paper during the past sev- 
eral months for " a gentleman with indomitable energy, "and offers to 
pay " a good salary to the right man." This individual, it is painfully 
apparent, is barking up a stump which conceals no coon. The T. C. 
knows the indomitable fellow who is sought for, but is pained to an- 
nounce that he is not now in the city. He was arrested lastMarch on 
a charge of assault with intent to commit burglary, ami at this time oc- 
cupies a pleasant, sunny room (references exchanged) in San Quentin. 
The same hotel accommodates a number of indomitably energetic men. 

On the occasion of his recent visit to President-elect Cleveland Hon. 
Barclay Henley, with admirable self-abnegation, refrained from referring 
to the question of the distribution of Pacific Coast patronage. When we 
consider that this subject is, in all probability, the burning issue in the 
mind of Mr. Henley, we must admire bis heroic pluck in "bidding his 
nervous yearning down," and mentally taking the measure of the next 
President's neck and piping off his manners. It has been said that poli- 
tics does not breed heroes, but we must allow an exception in the case of 
Mr. Henley. 

The distinguished chemist. Dr. Doremus, says thehvmidity of New 
York winters, with the alternate frosts and thaws, will eventually disin- 
tegrate the Egyptian obelisk, and estimates that in about 500 years the 
hieroglyphics carved thereon will lose their entire outline. Well, well, 
doctor, let us not simmer our souls over the matter. Five hundred years 
hence both Dr. Doremus and the T. C. will be disintegrated and the in- 
scriptions on their tombstones effaced by " the Winter's flaw." Why 
need we worrit if the obelisk keeps us company ? 

A hog weighing 1,079 pounds has been discovered io TJkiab, Mendo- 
cino county. What a splendid banquet that brute would make for the 
German Dictator! 

Governor Klncald, of Alaska, will spend the Winter in Washington, 
ostensibly for the purpose of securing needed legislation for bis bailiwick, 
but in reality, as the T. C. believes, to escape the frigidity of an Alaska 
climate. 

Coachmen, doctors, lawyers! The elopement craze will strike the 
bachelors next, and there's just where it ought to strike. 

Baseball bats will be flat next season, to correspond with the men 
that will wield them. 

Our German ladies take the prize for the heaviest babies. Their 
offspring are all Teutons. 

The Chinese Emperor drinks very little tea. Physicians seldom relish 
their own physic. 

General Gordon and El Mahdi are playing peek-a-boo in the wilds 
of Africa. 

Never look a Christmas gift on the cost mark. 



12 



SAN FRANOISOO NEWS LETTER AND 



10, 1865 



C. P. R. R. 

Time Schedule- Sunday, Nov. 23d, 1884. 

Trains leave, and are due to arrive at, 
Kan Francisco as follows: 



LRAVB 

(for) I 


DESTINATION. \ 


ARRIVE 

(from) 


8:00 a.m. 




6:40 p.m. 






11:10 a.m. 




ii 


10:10 a.m. 


8:00 a.m. 


. . . . Calistoga and Napa 


"10:10 a.m. 


"4:00 r.M. 


" " " 














11:10 a.m. 


8:00 a.m. 


....Delta, Redding and Portland 


6:40 P.M. 


3:30 P.M. 


. . ( Deming, El Paso ) Express. . . 


10:40 A.M. 


7:00 P. M - 


6:10 a.m. 


7:30 a.m. 


Gait and lone via Livermore 


6:40 p.m. 






"10:40 a.m. 


4:00 P.M. 


.... Knight's Landing 


10:10 a.m. 


3:30 p. m. 




10:40 a M. 


7:30 a.m. 


.. .Livermore and Pleasanton, . 


5:40 P.M. 


"5:00 p.m. 


U 11 (• 


'S.40A.M. 


J 8:00 a.m. 


.... Martinez 


6:40 p.m. 


*9:30 a.m. 


" 


•3:40 p.m. 








8:00 A.M. 


. . . . Marysville and Chico 


5:40 P.M. 


3:30 p.m. 


. . J Mojave and East 1 Express. 
..( '■ " f Emigrant 


10:40 A.M. 


7:00 p.m. 


6:10 a.m. 


7:30 a.m. 


....Nilesand Haywards 


5:40 P.M. 


10:00 a.m. 


,, " " '* 


3:40 p.m. 


3:00 P.M. 


it t< «i 


9:40 A.M. 


•5:00 P.M. 


x <( <« 


*8:40 A.M. 


3:00 p.h 


. . ( Ogden and East | Express. . . 
..( " " (Emigrant.. 


11:10 a.m. 


7:00 p.m. 


9:40 a.m. 


8:00 A.M. 


.. j Red Bluff > viaMarjsville. 
. . | and Tehama 1 via Woodland. 


5:40 p.m. 


8:00 A.M. 


6:40 p.m. 


7:30 a.m. 


Sacramento v ia Livermore.. 


5:40 p.m. 


8:00 a.m. 


.... " via Benicia 


6:40 P.M. 


3:00 P.M. 


.... " via Beniuia 


11:10 a.m. 


4:00 P.M. 


" via Benicia... . 


10:10 a.m. 


*4:00 p.m. 


Sacramento River Steamers. 


*6:00 A.M. 












t3:40 P.M. 


S:00 p.m. 


«■ 


9:40 a.m. 


7:30 a.m. 


....Stockton and 'Milton via Liv- 










"3:30 r.M. 


.... Stockton vie Martinez....... 


"10:40 a.m. 


"9:30 a.m. 


. . j Tulare, Fresno, 1 

. . ( Madera and Merced J 


"3:40 p.M. 


3:30 P.M. 


10:40 a.m. 


8:00 A.M. 


....Vallejo 


6:40 P.M, 


"9:30 A.M. 


" m 


"3:40p.M. 








4:00 P.M. 


<• 


10:10 a.m. 








8:00 a.m. 


....Woodland 


6:40 p.m. 


4:00 P M. 




10:10 a.m. 



Traiu leaving San Francisco at 8:00 a. m. meets 
Express from Ogden at Vallejo Junction, and ] 
Express from El r"aso and Mojave at Pinole. 
'Sundays excepted, t Sundays only. 



LOCAL FERRY TRAINS. 
From "SAN FBAN CISCO," Dai ly 

To EAST OAKLAND— «6:00, 
S-.30, 9:00, 



'6:30, 7:00, 7:30, 8:00, 
10:00, 10:30, 11:00, 11:30, 12:00, 12:30, 

1:00, 1:30, 2:00, 2:30, 3:00, 3:30, 4:00, 4:30, 6:00, 5:30, 

6:00, 6:30, 7:00, 8:00, 9:00, 10:00, 11:00, *12:00. 
To FKU1T VALE— '6:00, "6:30, «1:00, "7:30. *8:00, "8:30, 

•3:30, "4:00, »4:30, *5:00, *5:30, *6:00, '•etfO, 9:00. 
To FKUIT VALE (via Alameda) — *9:30, 6:30, (11:00, 

•12:00. 
To ALAMEDA— »6:00, »6:30, 7:00, "7:30, 8:00, "8:30, 9:00, 

9:30, 10:00, 110:30, 11:00, (11:30, 12:00, (12:30, 1:00, 

(1:30, 2:00, 3:00, 3:30, 4:00, 4:30, 5:00, 6:30, 6:00, 6:30, 

7:00, 8:00, 9:00, 10:00, 11:00, «12:00. 
To BERKELEY — »6:00, »6:30, 7:00, "7:30, 8:00, «8:30, 

9:00, (9:30, 10:00, (10:30, 11:00, (11:30, 12:00, 1:00, 

2:00, 3:00, 4:00, 4:30, 6:00, 6:30, 6:00, 6:30, 7:00, 8:00, 

9:00, 10:00, 11:00, »12:00. 
To WEST BERKELEY— »6:00, »6:30, 7:00, «"7:30, (8:00, 

•8:30, 9:00, 10:00, 11:00, (1:00, 2:00, 3:00, 4:00, "4:30, 

6:00, *5:30, 6:00, '$:Stl, 7:00. 



To "SAN FRANCISCO," Dally. 

Prom FRUIT VALE-<«:23, «6:53, '7:23, "7:53, "8: 
•8:63, «0:23, -10:21, "4:23, «4:53, '6:23, "6:53, '6: 

•6:63, 7:26, 9:60. 

From FRUIT VALE (via Alameda)— "5:15, "6:45, (6: 
(9:15, "3:15. 

From EAST OAKLAND -'6:30, »6:00. 6:30, 7:00, 7: 
8:00,8:30, 9:00, 9:30,10:00, 10:30,11:00, 11:30, 12: 
12:30, 1:00, 1:30, 2:00, 2:30, 3:00, 3:30, 4:00, 4:30, 5: 
6:30, 6:00, 6:30, 7:00, 7:57, 8:57, 9:57, 10:57. 

From BROADWAY, Oari,and-»5:37, »6:07, 6:37,7: 
7:37,8:07,8:37, 9:07, 9:37, 10:07, 10:37, 11:07, 11:37, 12: 
12:37, 1:07, 1:37, 2:07, 2:37, 3:07, 3:37, 4:07, 4:37, 6: 
6:37, 6:07, 6:37, 7:07, 8:06, 9:06, 10:06, 11:06. 

From ALAMEDA— »5:22, "5:52, "6:22, 6:52, "7:22, 7: 
•8:22, 8:52, 9:22, 9:52, (10:22, 10:52, (11:22, 11: 
(12:22,12:52,(1:22, 1:52, 2:52, 3:22, 3:62, 4:22, 4: 
6:22, 5:52, 6:22, 6:52, 7:52, 8:52, 9:52, 10:62. 

From BERKELEY— •5:15,«5:46, •6:15, 6:45, *7:15, 7: 
•8:15, 8:45, (9:15. 9:45, (10:15, 10:45, (11:15, 11: 
12:45, 1:46, 2:45, 3:45, 4:16, 4:45, 5:15, 6:45, 6:16, 6: 
7:45, 8:45, 9:45, 10:45. 

From WEST BERKELEY— »6:45, *6:16, 6:45, »7 
7:45, 8:45, (9:15, 9:45, 10:45, (12:45, 1:45, 2:45, 3 
4:46, '6:15, 5:45, »6:15, 6:45, *7:15. 



From SAN FRANCISCO— •7:16, 9:15, 11:16, 1:15, 3:15, 

6:16. 
From OAKLAND— »6:15, 8:15, 10:15, 12:15, 2:15, 4:16. 



•Sundays excepted. tSanduys only._ 



Pacific Standard Timo furniahed by Randolph & Co. 
101 Montgomery street, San FranciBCO. 
A. N. TOWNE, T. H. GOODMAN, 

Gen. Manager. Gen. Pass, and Tkt. Agt. 




Broad Gauge. 



COMMMENCINQ SUNDAY, NOV. 16th, 1884, and 
until f'irther notice. Boats and Trains will leave from 
and arrive at San Francisco Passenger Depot, MAR- 
KET-STREET WHARF, as follows 



Lravr S. F. 



Week 
Days. 



Sundays. 



Destination. Arrive in S. F. 



Petaluma, 

Santa Rosa, 

Fulton, 

Windsor, 

Healdsburg, 

Cloverdale 

and 

Way Stations. 



Sundays. 



Days. 



7:45 a. m. |8:00 a. m. | Ouerneville. |6:00 r. m. |6:00 p. m. 



Stages connect at Santa Rosa for Sebastonol. At 
Clairville for Skaggs Springs, and at Cloverdale for 
Highland Springs, Kelseyville, Soda Bay, Lakeport, 
Bartlett Springs, Ukiah, Eureka, Navarre Ridge, Men- 
docino City and the Geysers. 

EXCURSION TICKETS from Saturdays to Mondays, 
tn Petaluma, SI 75 ; to Santa Rosa, S3 ; to Healdsburg, 
54 ; to Cloverdale, 85. 

EXCURSION TICKETS, good for Sundays only— Tn 
Petaluma, SI 50 : to Santa Rosa, S2 ; to Healdsburg, S3; 
to Cloverdale, $4 50 ; to Guerneville, S3. 

From San Francisco for Point Tiburon and San Ra- 
fael, Week Days-7:45 a. m., 9:10 A. M., 3:30 P. m., 5:00 
p. m.; Sundays: 8:00 A. m., 10:30 A. M., 2:30 p. M., 
5:00 p. M 

To San Franci'co from San Rafael, Week Days — 
8:00 A. M., 10:20 A. M., 3:40 p. M., 5:05 r. M.; Sun- 
days: 8:10 A. M , 11:45 A. M., 3:45 p. M., 5:05 p. M. 

To San Francisco from Point Tiburon, Week Days — 
8:20 A. m., 10:45 A. M. 4:05 p. m., 5:30 p. M-; Sundays: 
8:35 A. m., 12:10 p. M. ( 4:10 p. m., 5:30 p. M. 

PETER J. McGLYNN, ARTHUR HUGHES. 
Gen. Pass, and Tkt. Agt. General Manager. 



SONOMA VALLEY R. R. 

Steamer JAMES M. DONAHUE Leaves San Francisco, 

and Connects with Trains at SONOMA 

LANDING, as follows: 

4. AA r.M., Daily (Sundays excepted), from WASH- 
• ^ ^ INGTON-STREET WHARF, for the Town 
of Sonoma, Glen Elleu and Way Points. 

Sunday Excursions. 

8.0/-\ A. m. (Sundays only), from WASHINGTON- 
,£L\J STREET WHARF, for the Town of So- 
noma, Glen Ellen and Way Points. Round-Trip Tickets : 
To Sonoma, SI; to Glen Ellen, §1 50. 
PETER J. McGLYNN, ARTHUR HUGHES, 

Gen. Pass, and Tkt Agt. General Manager. 



ONLY 

A common dooryard 

Back of a common flat ; 
Only a kitchen doorstep, 

And an old J. Thos. cat 
Lazily in the sunshine 

Dozing on the mat. 

Only an open window 

Directly overhead ; 
Only a fiendish boarder, 

His face with grins o'erspread, 
(All of which implies a big surprise 

For that sleeping quadruped.) 

Only a pitcher of water 

Dumped with precision square 

Icy down upon that J. T. C. 
So calmly sleeping there — 

And a frenzied chunk of cat-meat 
Jumps six ft. up in the air. 

— The Judge. 

Mr. Cleveland should paste up the official re- 
turns for future reference. There were 4,913,- 
901 votes cast for him, and if any more than 
that number of voters apply for office he will 
know that Borne hungry members of the oppo- 
sition are trying to "ring in " on him. 

— Columbus Dispatch. 

A thoroughbred Boston girl never calls it 
a " crazy quilt." She always speaks of that in- 
sane article as a " non compos mentis covering." 
— N. Y. Journal. 




BROAD UAIGE. 

Winter Time Schedule. 

Commencing- Sunday, Not. 16. 1884, 
And until further notice, Passenger Trains will leave 
from and arrive at San Francisco Passenger Depot 
(Townsend St., between 3d and 4th streets), as follows: 



LEAVE 
8. F. 



t6:50 A.M. 

8:30 A M. 
10:40 a.m. 
*3:30 p.m. 

4:30 p.m. 
"5:16 p.m. 

6:30 P.M. 



8:30 a.m. 
10:40a.M. 
*3:30 p.m. 

4:30 P.M. 



10:40 A.M. 
*3:30p.m. 



10:40 a.m. 
*3:30 p.m. 



DESTINATION. 



.San Mateo, Redwood,... 
....and Menlo Park... 



..Santa Clara, San Joseand.. 
. . Principal Way Stations . . . 



6:35 a.m. 
*S:10 a.m. 
9:03 a.m. 
*10:02am. 
3:36 p.m. 
t5:02 p.m. 
6:0S P.M. 



9:03 A.M 

*10:02a.M. 

3:36 P.M. 

C:0Sp.m. 



.Gilroy, Paju.ro, Castroville. II '10:' 
...Salinas and Monterey.... f | 6:' 



02 a v . 
P. v. 



.Hollisterand Tres Pinos.. } T 1 ^! P " M ' 



10:40 a.m. J Watsonville, Aptos, Soquel > I fl no P « 
'•'3.3 r.M { (Camp Capitola)&Santa Cruz. I j - U5 ''* 
1 0:40 A.M.I-(TSo le dad"and W ay Stations. J-| 6:0S p.m. 
♦Sundays excepted. fSundays only (Sportsmen's Train). 



iI3TSTASDARD ok Time. — Trains are run on Pacific 
Standard Time {Randolph & Co.), which is Ten (10) 
minutes faster than San Francisco Local Time. 



STAGE CONNECTIONS are made with the 10:40 a. m 
Train, except PESCADERO StageB via San Mateo and 
Redwood, which connect with 8:30 A. m. Train. 

SPECIAL ROUND-TRIP TICKETS.— At Reduced 
Rates — to Monterey, Aptos, Soquel and Santa Cru'; 
also to Paraiso and Paso Robles Springs. 

EXCURSION TICKETS 

c- c- a . „„i , ( Sold Sunday Morning ; good for 
For Sundays only, j Rctum same day 

For Saturday, ( Sold Saturday and Sunday only ; 
Sunday and-< good for Return until follow ii ig Mon- 
Monday (day, inclusive, at the following rates: 



Round Trip B „_ Sat to Rouud Trip „ 
from San SuP Mon. from San ' 



Francisco to 



San Bruno.. 
Millbrae .... 
Oak Grove.. 
San Mateo. 
Belmont.... 
RciUviukI. . .. 
Fair Oaks... 
Menlo Park. 
Mayfield .... 



75 
1 00 
1 00 
1 25 
1 25 
1 25 



e 50 
65 
90 
1 10 
1 25 
1 40 
1 50 
1 60 
1 75 



Fran ci; co to 



Mount'nView 
Lawrences... 
Santa Clara . 
San Jose.... 

Gilroy 

Aptos 

Soquel 

Santa Crux.. 
Monterey .. . 



Sat to 
Mon. 

Tkt, 



31 .'.o i 

1 50 
1 75 

1 75 

2 75 



S2 no 

•> 25 
2 50 
2 50 

4 00 

5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 



TICKET OFFICES. - Passenger Depot, Townsend 
street; Valencia-street Station, and No. 613 Market 
street, Grand Hotel. 
A. C. BASSETT, H. R. JUDAH, 

Superintendent. Asst. Pass. & Tkt. Agt. 

^" SOUTHERN DIVISIONS.^ 
For points on Southern Divisions and the East, see 
C. P. R. R. Time Schedule. 



SITTING ON A STILE. 

A maiden coy and tall slim boy 

Sat cooing on a stile ; 
The boy's lip wore a slight mustache, 

The girl's lip wore a smile. 
'I love thee.' quoth the boy, and stroked 

That faint and downy line; 
'And I,' the siren softly sighed, 

' Would dye it were it mine.' 
He left that maiden like a flash, 

A minute to the mile. 
Ah! trifle not with youth's mustache 

When sitting on the style. 

— Texas Si/tings. 

At a musical soiree a lady, after executing 
an interminable piano solo, faints dead away. A 
gentleman, with great promptitude, seizes a glass 
of water and administers a few drops to the lady, 
who revives. Then, with a compassionate cry, 
" !Now for the other sufferer," he pours the re- 
mainder of the water in the piano. 

The following is said to be a literal transla- 
tion of a paragraph in a French novel: "Cast- 
ing herself between her brother and his intended 
victim the fair Inez exclaimed, in a voice that 
vibrated with agony, 'Rodolpho, do notk II him, 
for if you did he would surely die.' " 






CALIFORNIA ADVEHTISKK. 



13 



BIZ. 



Wo remark, at the oatast <-f our weakly wriew, ■ decided Improve 
incut iu butli the demand and price of shipping Wheat Tbia advance la 
owing to more favorable advloee at band from Burope and in Eastern At 
Untie ottlea. The riae with m is folly 20a I' oil. say tlit* lowest price of 
theaaaaont] LB, oow$] g c tl. The price of Flour has also 

advano [' bbL for tlie higher grades, This i* owing in I'irt 

to the rise in Wheat but more to the tfreat decline in Bran, which latter 
Hilda fully IV. |* bbl to tho cost of the Floor. Bran has of late been 

, dealt in at the <":ill Board, and Futures were run up desperately, 
but the settlement came at the close of the year, causinc several " lame 
docks." Weonote Wheat, buyer season, v l 39@$1 W ]■ ctl; lmyer 1885, 
B M asked. The Barley market is rather quiet aince New Year's Day. 
The wet, rainy weather has taken the starch out of many holders, and 

pot offerings are more free. We quote Feed 85@95c.; Brewing, 
-1 I2jj C'etl.; No. 1, buyer season, $1 07£ ; seller season, 944c; 
buyer 1885, Olc; buyer January, Or»Ac. Corn seems to be ignored" at 
present within the rantre of SI 0~>ui si 25 t-' ctl. for the different grades. 
l"he supply of Oats is large, and the demand limited. The price ranges 
from SI up to SI 50 (;> ctl. for the various gradea. 

Salmon Exports by sea during 1SS4 aggregated 14.1, 735 cases, 5,687 
bbls., 4,863 hf.-bbls., 052 kits— all of the value of $771,521. 

Nails. The Pacific Iron and Nail Company has advanced the price of 
Nails to $2 00 per keg, 2 per cent, off for cash and a rebate of 10 cents 
per keg on carload lots of 200 kegs. 

Coffee.— Business during the last fortnight has been almost at a stand- 
still. The aales for home consumption are very insignificant. 150 bags 
good Cuatemala, new crop, sold for Cbicag-o at 12c. The New York 
market is also very dull ; fair Rio cargoes are reported nominal at OJc. 
Ileceipts in Rio de Janeiro from July 1st to December 17th were : 
•_',:ijr.,UOO bags, again&t 1.1MG.000 during the Bame period of 1883. The 
daily receipts f.>r the fortnight ending December 17th averaged 13,500 
bags, against 14,000 the previous year. 

Sugar.- The market is very dull, without change in the prices of Re- 
lined and (imcery Raws. At this writing the parcels recently received 
from Central America are still unsold, although for desirable lots refiners 
have offered on the basis of New York prices, without any reduction, 
iris : 5§C. for 00 polarization. This shows an advance on former rates and 
is the result of competition among refiners. Quotations are : 

R.-fined Crushed 7 (S8 c. per lb. 

Refined Yellow 5|@6|c. per lb. 

Hawaiian, grocery grades 5 @5.(c. per lb. 

Central Amer. Centrifugals, light colored grocery grades. .44@5§c per lb. 
Central American Centrifugals, polarizing 'J5{5)% per c. . .5 @5^c. per lb. 
Cen. Amer. Muscovadoes, bright, polariziug84@94 perc. .4 @5^c. per lb. 
Central American Muscovadoes, low refining 3J(jx(4 c. per lb. 

Coal and Iron. — The annual report of the Coal and Pig Iron market, 
Hsueil by I. Steuart, has been received. He places the total receipts of 
coal at 041,220 tons, and states that it is understood one of the coast 
Bources of supply which has annually placed some GO,OOO((/!7O,0OO tons in 
this market, will permanently cease operations shortly. The Btock of Pig 
Iron, according to the same authority, is 9,890 tons, and the imports for 
the year 11,980 tons. 

Grain Freights have been quite active during the week, and embrace 
the following engagements : Br. iron bark London, 1,152 tons, Wheat to 
Cork, U. K., £2 2s. Gd.; Br. iron ship Naiad, 1,039 tons Wheat to Cork, 
U. K., £2 2s. Gd. ; Br. iron ship Great Britain, 3,000 tons, Wheat to 
Cork, U. K., owner's account ; Br. iron ship Ladahk, 1,942 tons. Wheat 
to Cork, owner's account; Br. iron ship Lord Wolseley, 2,404 tons, 
Wheat to Liverpool direct, £1 13s. 9d.; ship General Knox, 2,141 
t >ns, Wheat to Liverpool direct, £1 12s. 6d.; ship Carondelet, 1,438 tons, 
Wheat to Cork, U. K., or Havre, £1 15s. direct, 2s. Gd. less; Br. iron 
ship Lord Lyndehurst, 1,187 tons, Wheat to Cork, TJ. K., £2; Br. ship 
Struan, 1,473 tons, Wheat to Cork, TJ. K., or Continent, £1 12s. Gd., di- 
rect port 2s. 6d. less; Br. ship Forest King, 1.G02 tons, Wheat to Cork, 
TJ. K, Havre or Antwerp, £1 12s. Gd.; ship Henrietta, 1,209 tons, 
Wheat t-j Cork, TJ. K. , Havre or Antwerp, £1 15s. , direct port 2-1. Gd. leas; 
Br. iron ship CaiMoch. 1,204 tons, Wheat to Cork, TJ. K., £2 2s. Gd.; ship 
John Rosenfeld, 2,300 tons, Wheat to Liverpool, £1 15s.; Br. 
iron ship Hartfield, 1,758 tons, Wheat to Cork, TJ. K., £2; ship 
Henrietta, 1,200 tons, Wheat to Cork, TJ. K., Havre or Antwerp, £1 17s. 
Gd.; a recharter ; Br. iron ship Lady Cairns, 1.278 tons, Wheat to Cork, 
U. K., owners' account ; Br. bark James Stafford, 1,110 tons, Wheat to 
Cork, TJ. K., private ; G-er. Bhip Clara, 1,037 tons, Wheat or Flour to 
Liverpool, Newcastle or Belfast direct, £1 16s. ; Galway direct, £117s.; 
orders for one of above £1 I83. 6d.; sbip Baring Brothers, 2,091 tons, 
Wheat to Liverpool direct, £1 I63. ; ship Standard, 1,535 tons, Wheat to 
Cork, TJ. K., Havre or Antwerp, £1 18s.; nothing less direct; ship J. B. 
Walker, Wheat to Liverpool direct, £115s.; Br. bark James Stafford, 
1.116 tons, Wheat to Cork, TJ. K., or Continent, £1 17s. 6d.; direct port, 
2s. 6d. less. 

Lumber Charters. — Bktne. Wrestler, 447 tons, Lumber from Colum- 
bia river to Panama, private. Ship Spartan, 1,376 tons, Lumber from 
Puget Sound to Australia, private. Br. iron bark Sidlaw, 499 tons, 
Lumber to Coquimbo, private. 

From the Orient.— The O. & O. steamship, , 24 days from 

Hongkong, via. Yokohama 15 days, is at hand, bringing for cargo 22,185 
mats Rice, 377 pkgs. Tea, 36 pkgs. Silk, 3S4 pkgs. Oil, 140 pkgs. SpiceB, 
140 bales Gunnies, 100 bales Jute, 114 bags Coffee and 4,700 pkgs. Chow- 
Chow ; also in transit for Eastern cities, to go overland, 2,200 pkgs. Tea, 
627 pkgs. Silk, etc. 

The Produce Exchange report stocks on hand in city warehouses 
Jan. 1, 1885 : Flour, 29,900 bbls.; Wheat, 424,282 ctls.; Barley, 390,500 
ctls.; OatB, 154,150 ctls.; Corn, 11,503 ctls.; Rye, 4,150 ctls.; Beans, 
02,025 centals. 



Latest Grain Charters. Br. Iron ship ( Irown 
Liver] I direct. £2 .V Ship Win, 



■f Bnglan 
II. Smith, 2,004 tons, 

I'M, 1 ,951 CODA, 



Wheat t.. L. 

Wheat to Liver] I direct, fc\ Los. 3d. tfutoh ship 1 

Wheat to Liverpool, II 7s. l". i.; orders for our of above |"»rts, L'l 10-.. IU 

ship (iron) Lord Lyndhnrst, 1.187 tow, Wheat to Cork, V. K , ISl 2a, Bd 

Ship Sin tram. 1,673 tons. Wheat to Liver] I, i;i 16a. Bd. Brijj I 

nay Ford, 381 tons. Lumber t<> Honolulu, At the uloae, shipnwm 
asking £2 5a. for British iron to Liver] Ij others ask B2 10*., I . K. 

To Consumers.- The beef a la mode, boiled beef, roast beef, boiled 

and ronst mutton, sausage meat and comprised tongue put up by the 
king-Morse Canning Company is unexcelled. 

Grand concerts in the Park on Saturday and Sunday, under the aus- 
pices of the Market-street Cable Railway Company. 

officesTto let 

— IX TUB — 

FIREMAN'S FUND INSURANCE COMPANY'S BUILDING, 

Corner California and Sansome Streets. 

Sunny Suites and Single Rooms, all new and conveniently arranged, anil having 
Electric Dells and Shaking Tubes from lower hall. 

FIRST-CLASS ELEVATOR IN BUILDING. 

655" The Most Eligible Location in tho City for C. rpirations or Profession*! .Men. 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE, 

Hale * Norcross silver Mining Company.— Location of 
Principal Place of Business, San Francisco, California. Locution uf Works. 
Virginia Mining District, Storey county, Nevada, Notice is hereby given that at it 

meeting of the Board of Directors, held on the 8th day of December, 18S4, ;in 
assessment {No. 83) of Fifty Cents per share was levied upon the capital Btock of 
the corporation, payable immediately, in United States gold '..in, to the Secretary, 
at the office of the company, Room 58, Nevada Block, No. 30'.) Montgomery street! 
San Francisco, California. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on the 
Thirteenth Duy of Jann try, 1885, 
Will be delinquent and advertised fur sale at public auction; and unless payment is 
made before, will be sold on Tuesday, the 3d day of February, 1885, to pay the 
delinquent assessment, together with est of advertising and expenses <>f sale. 

By order of tbe Board of Directors. JoEL F. L1GHTNER, Secretary. 

OlHce - Room 58, Nevada Block, No. 309 Montgomery Btreet, Sun Francisco, Cal, 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

The German Savings and Loan society.— For the half-year 
ending Dec. 31st, 18S4, the Board of Directors of THE GERMAN SAVINGS 
AND LOAN SOCIETY has declared a Dividend on term deposits at the rate of four 
and thirty-two one-hundredtha (4 32-100) per cent, per annum, and on ordinary 
deposits at the rate of three and six-tenths (3 0-10) per cent, per annum, and pay- 
able on and after tho 2d day of January, 1885. By order. 
[Dec. 27.] GEO. LETTE, Secretary. 

AMERICAN EXCHANGE HOTEL, 

SANSOME STREET, COB. HAIXECK, SAN FRANCISCO. 

This hotel is in the very center of the businees portion of tbe city, and has been 
renovated and newly furnished throughout. The traveling public will ibid this to 
be the most convenient as well as the most comfortable and respectable hotel, in the 
city. TABLE FIRST CLASS. Boardand Room, 91, SI 25 and §1 50 per day. Nice 
Single Rooms, per night, 50 cents. Breakfasts or Dinners, 50 cents. Lunch, 25 
Cents. Eighteen Tickets, good for any meala, $5, Hot and Cold Baths, free. Free 
Coach to and from the hotel. April 12. 

MOUNT VERNON COMPANY, BALTIMORE. 

The undersigned having been appointed AGENTS FOR THE PAC1F C COAST 
for the sale of the manufactures of above company, have now in store: 

Sail Duck--n.il Numbers; 
Hydraulic -all Numbers: 
Draper and Wagon Duck, 

From 30 to 1-20 Inches Wide, and a Complete Assortment of All Qualities 28',-Inc 
DUCK, from 7 ozs. to 16 ozs,, inclusive. 

MURPHY, GRANT & CO. 

JOSEPH GILLOTT'S STEEL PENS. 

Gold Medal, Paris, 1878. 

Mold by all Stationers. Sole Agent for tbe United States: 

^ MR. HENRY HOE, 91 John street, N. Y. Jan. 5. 

ALASKA COMMERCIAL COMPANY 

No. 310 Sansome Street, 

San Francisco, 

WHOLESALE DEALERS IN WUBS. 

R. J. MAGUIRB & CO., 

COAL! -WHOLESALE AND RETAIL. 

[Telephone No. 383.] 



206 and 208 Folsom Street. 



COKE CHEAPEST FUEL. 

Reduction In Price: Wholesale Price, 50 cents per barref ; 
Retail Price, 60 cents per barrel, at the works of the SAN FRANCISCO GAS- 
LIGHT COMPANY, Howard and First streets, and foot of Second st. Jan. 12. 

ADD T7 T^* Send bix cents for postage, and receive free, a costly box 
J. J-v ±Z-* JLj. of goods which will help alt, of cither sex, to more money 
right away than anything else in this world. Fortunes await the workers absolute 1 ? 
sure. At once address Truk A Oo„ Augusta, Maine. 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Jan. 10, 1885 



L.LOY!) TKVIS, President, San Francisco. 
| No, |. Valentine, Vice-President 

.i : i ■ t (..jii. Manager, San Francisco. 
James Heron, secretary, S;.n Francisco. 
)l, i(. PakshNS. Ass't Stc'y. New York. 
II. WaDsWOR'I li, Treasurer, S.in Francisco. 



office of the 
Vice-Pres't and Gen'l Manager. 



fills, Iarjj0 & 4 0m P an 8t 



%%#u$$ m m 



§avi ertcmciaco, JcmticMHj 11 OOO. 



Dear Sir : The following is a copy of our Annual Statement of precious Metals produced in the States and 
Territories west of the Missouri River (including British Columbia, and receipts by express from the West Coast States 
of Mexico) during 1SS4, which shows aggregate products as follows : Gold, $26,256,542 ; Silver, $45,799,069 ; Copper, 
$6,086,252; Lead, $6,834,091. Total gross result, $84,975,954. 

California shows a decrease in Gold of $944,703, and an increase of Silver of $513,597. In Nevada, the 
Comstock shows an increase of $1,668,524 ; Eureka District shows a decrease of $123,152. In the total product of the 
State there is an increase of $117,318; Montana shows a considerable increase; Colorado and Arizona a decreace 
from the production of 1883. 

As stated hitherto, the facilities afforded for the transportation of lullion, ores, and base metals, by the extension 
of riilroads into mining districts, increase the difficulty of verifying the reports of the products from several important 
localities; and the general tendency is to exaggeration when the actual values are not obtainable from authentic sources; 
b'Jt the aggregate result, as shown herein, we think may be relied on w th reasonable confidence as approximately correct. 



STATES AND TERRITORIES. 


Gold Dust & Bullion 
by Express. 


Gold Dust & Bullion 

1 by 
other conveyances. 


Silver Bullion by 
Express. 


Oics and Base 
Bullion by Express. 


TOTAL. 




$12,282,471 

I>527.859 
368,315 

45.964 

35.014 

1,010,077 

1,875,000 

31. 5 ot 

2,575.861 
157,688 
360,791 

2.726,847 
285,256 
647,719 


$614,123 


$i,S°4,7°5 

5,9°5,3o4 

2,695 

i,i79 


$ 871,689 
1,455,776 


$15,272,988 

8,8S8,939 

555. l6 7 

70,125 

ii5. OI 4 
3.542,177 






184,157 
22,982 
80,000 

150,000 












812,100 
6,175,000 
2,657,054 
4,877,888 

906,248 
3,139,628 

110,000 
2,257,144 


1,570,000 
3,812,000 

4,697,147 

12,780,000 

2,536,678 

3.455,9 6 ° 

12,000 




Utah 


4,134 


7,389,836 

20,233,749 

3,660,614 

7,056,379 
2,986,847 

2,554,4°° 
787,719 






60,000 
100,000 
150,000 






Mexico (West Coast States) 




140,000 




$23,930,363 


$1,505,396 


$28,348,945 


$31,191,250 


$84,975,954 



The gross yield for 1884, shown above, segregated, is approximately as follows: 

, Gold 30-&V/0 $26,256,542 

Sllver ; 53tu°u-% 45.799.o69 

Copperf. 7^% r. . . 6,086,252 

. Lead .W. : 8^% 6,834,091 

$84,975,954 

ANNUAL PRODUCTS OF LEAD, COPPER~SILVER AND GOLD IN THE STATES AND TERRITORIES WEST OF THE MISSOURI RIVER, 1870-1884. 



YEAR. 


Production as per 

W. F. & Go's Statements, 

including amounts 

from British Columbia 

and West Coast of 

Mexico. 


Product after 
deducting Amounts 

from British 

Columbia and West 

Coast of Mexico. 


The Net Product of the States and Territories west of the Missouri River.exclusive of British 
Columbia and West Coast of Mexico, divided, is as follows : 




Lead. 


Copper. 


Silver. 


Gold. 


1S70. . . . 


$54,000,000 
58,284,000 
62,236,959 
72,258,693 
74,401,045 
80,889,057 
90.875.I73 

9 s ,42i,754 
81,154,622 

75.349.501 
80,167,936 
84,504,417 
92,411,835 
90,313,612 
84.975.954 


$52,150,000 
55,784,000 
60,351,824 
70,139,860 
71,965,610 
76,703.433 
87.219.859 
95,811,582 
78 276,167 

72,688,8S8 
77.232,512 
81,198,474 

89,207,549 
84,639,212 
81,633,835 


$I,o8o,O0O 
2,100,000 
2,250,000 
3,450,000 
3,800,000 
5,100,000 
5,040,000 
5,085,250 
3,452,000 
4,185,769 

5,742,390 
6,361,902 
8,008,155 
8,163,550 
6,834,091 




$17,320,000 
19,286,000 

19,924,429 
27.4S3.302 
29,699,122 

3 I > 6 35.239 
39,292,924 
45,846,109 

37.248,137 
37.032,857 

38.033,055 
42,987,613 

48,133,039 
42,975,101 

43.529.025 


$"3.75°.°° 
34,398,°°° 
38,177,395 
39,206,558 
38,466,488 
39,968,194 
42,886,935 
44,880,223 
37.576,030 
31,470,262 
32.559.06/ 
30.653.959 
29,01 1,310 
27,816,640 
25.t83.567 


1871 




1S72 




1873.... 




1874.... 




1875 




1876.... 




1877.... 




1878 




1879.... 

1880 

1881.... 
188? 

1883.... 
1884. . . . 


$ '98,000 
1,195,000 

4,°.'5>°37 
5,683,921 
6,086,252 



i 

The exports 'of Silver' during the past year to Japan, China, the Straits, 
London, $40,221,658; from Marseilles, $1,361,250; from Venice, $130,680; from 
Total, $55,617,578. 



etc., have been as follows : 
San Francisco, $13,903,990. 



From 



Jan. 10, 1885. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



10 



TROnrCT OF GOLD AND SILVER IN THE REPUBLIC OK MEXICO FROM 1877 TO 1884. 



YF.AK. 


Gold. 


SlLVBR. 


TOTAL. 


1S77-187S 


$661,385 
662,524 
474,632 
380,301 
382,752 
380,419 
500,000 


$21,451,785 

21,405,330 
23.3 S 3,448 

23,583,135 
24,009,525 
22,921,921 
24,000,000 


$22,113,170 
22,067,854 
23,858,080 
23.963,436 
24,392,277 
23.302,340 
24,500,000 


1S78-1S79 


l88o-l88l 


1SS1 .1882 


1882-1883 


•1883-1884 




Total 


$3,442,013 


$160,755,144 


$164,197, '57 





EXHIBIT OF COINAGE OF GOLI>, SILVER AND COPPER IN THE REPUBLIC OF MEXICO FROM THE 1st OF JULY, 1S72, TO THE 30th OF 
JUNE, 1S84, INDICATING APPROXIMATELY THE PRECIOUS METAL PRODUCT OF THE COUNTRY FOR THE YEARS NAMED. 



YEAR. 


Gold Dollars. 


Silver Dollars. 


Coitrr Dollars. 


1872-187* 


813,415 
866,743 
862,619 
809,401 

695,750 
691,998 
658,206 
521,826 
492,068 

452,59° 
407,600 
500,000 


19,680,811 
18,846,067 
19,386,958 

19,454,054 
21,415,128 
22,084,203 
22,162,987 
24,018,528 

24,617,395 
25,146,260 
24,083,921 
24,000,000 


22,814 
15,966 
21,712 
30,654 
9,035 
4',364 
16,300 






lS7=C 1876 


1876 1877 


1877-1878 


1S78-1870 


1879-18S0 


14,035 


18S0-1881 


42,258 


1881-1882 


11,972 


1882-1S83 




*iSS3 1S84.. 








Total 


7,772,216 


264,896,312 


226,1 IO 







SUMMARY. 

Totals: Gold, $7,772,216 ; Silver, $264,896,312 ; Copper, $226,110 ; Grand Total, $272,394,638. 
* The production of 1SS3 to 1SS4 is estimated. 

EXHIBIT OF THE COINAGE OF MEXICO FROM THE ESTABLISHMENT OF THE MINTS IN 1537 TO THE END OF THE FISCAL YEAR OF iSSj-lSt,.! . 



Colonial Epoch. 


Gold. 


Silver. 


COI'PER. 


TOTAL. 


$ 8,497,950 
19,889,014 
40,391,447 


$ 752,067,456 
441,629,211 
888,563,989 


$200,000 


$ 760,765,4 6 

461,518.-'.- 
929,298,32 ) 




342,893 








$68,778,411 


$2,082,260,656 


$542,893 $2,I5I,58l.S(0 


Independence. 

Iturbid^'s Imperial Bust, from 1822-23. • 
Republ'c Eagle — 1824 to 30th June, 1873 


$ 557,392 
45,040,628 


$ 18,575,569 
740,246,484 




$ I9.132.<; 6 1 
790,522,290 


$5. 2 35,I77 




■ $45,598,020 


$758,822,054 


$5.Z35. I 77 


$809,655,25 I 


Republic 
Eagle coin, from 1st July, 1873 to 30th of 


$7,772,216 


$264,896,312 


$226,110 


$272.S94.6jS 







SUMMARY. 

Colonial Epoch— from 1537 to 1821, $2,151,581,960; Independence— from 1822 to i873,$8o9,655, 251 ; Republic 
—from 1873 to 18S4, $272,894,638; Total, $3,234,131,849. 

The exhibits of production and mintage indicate a steady development of the mining interests of Mexico, and with 
the increasing facilities of railway communication fostering every department of industry, the outlook for the prosperity 
of the Republic during the present year is most encouraging. _ . 

The exports of precious metals for the first nine months of 1884 show a marked increase in amounts to the united 
States of America, presaging the rapid growth of commercial relations between the two Republics. 

JOHN J. VALENTINE, 
Vice-President 6- Genl. Manager Wells, Fargo &• Company. 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 10, 1885. 



PASSING REMARKS. 



Judging by the list of operas announced for the second week of the 
season, Abbott has an extended " repeatoire." 

■**•** 

At the Traviata performance I sat behind a rather unsophisticated 
young person, properly escorted. She seemed to follow with great inter- 
est the opera, but her views of the plot, as audibly whispered to her 
companion, were more amusing than wise. In the scene where "Vio- 
letta " Bhows "Alfredo's " father the bill of sale of her goods and chattels 
the red seal attached to the document caught the innocent young person's 
eye. She had heard of Abbott's virtuous conservatism on the stage, and 
she had, surreptitiously probably, read the reports of our cause celebre, 
and under the mixed meutal influence she astonished those within the 
radius of her voice by the question, " Is that her marriage certificate 
that his father wants her to destroy ? " 

* * * * * 

In La Traviata, the absurdity of English dialogue in Italian opera, or 
any serious opera, for the matter of that, attained its climax. A servant 
enters and addresses " Violetta as follows: 



you! " 



" A et-ter for 

'■Violetta" takes it, and by way of proof of the antiquity of slang, 
reads from it as follows: 



" From Flo- 



She's go- to the 



a! ah! 



ball this 



In the terrible scene where Alfredo heaps insults, reproaches and gold 
upon the prostrate Violetta, Alfredo calmly asks of the public the follow- 
ing conundrum : "Did I insult her, or did I chide her? " The audience 
gives it up. 

I might cite a dozen instances in which the English words, fitted to airs 
that are familiar to every one, render them absurd and nonsensical. The 
Italian text expresses the same ideas, it is true, but then most of us do 
not understand Italian, and, if we do, its smoothness and euphony in- 
vests the most commonplace utterance with fascinating idealism. For 
Italians themselves this is not even necessary, as they have no sense of 
the ridiculous, and do not see anything ludicrous in aa arpeggio ejacula- 
tion of "Go fetch the doctor!" 

***** 

There is misery in the female camp. The performance of King for a 
Day has been postponed, and Tag is not to be seen arrayed in an old gold 
robe, a sunny smile and a mischievous twinkle. In this elaborate cos- 
tume, he is declared by all the susceptible creatures to be beautiful. The 
weeping and gnashing of teeth can be imagined. I don't know the cause 
of the postponement. Something may be the matter with the old gold 
rube ; it may be soiled. Or, perhaps, the smile is in the shade. Or, 
again, it may be the twinkle which is out of order. Anyway, the per- 
formance is not to take place, and the disconsolate ones are going to send 
a remonstrance to Mr. Emma Abbott. 

***** 

I have seen woe of all kinds. Woe in books, woe in pictures, woe in 
opera, and Woe Emma ! But I have never seen such a concentrated, 
double-distilled, superlative extract of the article as is shown us in Tag- 
lapietra's Binging of the " Heart Bowed Down." He was woe from top 
to toe. Every fiber in his body was impregnated with it. The furniture 
in the apartment in which this woe was exhibited caught it, and pre- 
sented an appearance in keeping. I can't imagine that heart ever rising 

again. 

***** 

Speaking of Balfe's ballad, reminds me of a very laughable incident 
which occurred during a performance of the Bohemian Girl by the Hess 
troupe, at the California Theatre, some vears ago, Carleton was the 
Count Aruheim of the cast. The prompter employed was a graduate 
from an Italian opera company, and possessed the conventional persist- 
ency and penetration of whisper of his school. During the performance 
I allude to he was auricularly so annoying that its progress was marked 
by well-defined hisses. In the third act, Carleton advanced to the foot- 
lights, during the ritournelle, and was greeted, on his way, by an audible 
admonition that the "heart was bowed down." Carleton glared down at 
the box from which the remark had come, and commenced to sing. For 
the nonce the solo was transformed into a duet, the prompter contribut- 
ing a vigorous, syncopated second. Carleton was, to put it mildly, an- 
noyed ; the audience manifested its displeasure by repeated " sh's," but 
the zealous occupant of the prompter's den was not to be disturbed. The 
matter became ludicrous, and Carleton began to smile. He final- 
ly lost control of himself and retired to the back of the stage, convulsed 
with laughter. The prompter, too satisfied with his work to understand 
the true state of affairs, bee tme aluio ^t frantic in his direcli ms to Carle- 
ton, who, to end the absurd scene, wisely had the curtain lowered, amidst 
the fierce whispers of " Memory is the only friend- -memory is the only 
friend — grief can call its own — grief can call its own— only friend — call its 
own — memory — grief ! " 

* * * * 

I am making a collection of instantaneous photographs. They are 
wonderful things. They picture people, figuratively speaking, in dis- 
habille. I have got one of an artist, noted for his grace of pose, taken in 
the act of striking at a tennis ball. I will not injure my friend, for he is 
such, by describing the attitude which the tell-tale instrument has 
caught. The kangaroo hop is poetical by comparison. I wish to add the 
folllowiog to my album : " Abbott's joyful skip— Mignon, First Act." 
" Annandale's pas de seduction— Carmen, Second Act." And " Abbott 
in page's costume — Mignon, Second Act — figure profile en movement." 

Clairbeau. 



A REMARKABLE MACHINE. 
A working engineer In Aberdeen has just invented a very 
ingenious machine for recording the number of passengers entering and 
leaving tramway cars, omnibuses, cabs or coaches. Bisset's Indicator, 
as it is called, besides registering the number of persons who enter or 
leave such conveyances as it may be used on, will perform with equal 
fidelity the somewhat marvelous function of noting, in the caBeof a tram- 
way car or omnibus, the exact amount of cash that ought to be received 
in fares by the conductor during a journey or series of journeys. The 
Indicator, as applied to a tramway car, would be placed on the platform, 
and every person entering would pass through a turnstile, and in so doing 
set the machine in motion. The same result would take place in a person 
leaving the car; but the wonderful thing about the invention is the fact 
that it records the number of persons who travel one or more stages, or 
make the entire journey, so that at the end of the day the sum which 
ought to be handed over by the conductor may be ascertained by a simple 
calculation. 

TEA-CULTURE AT TEMESCAL. 

Mons Cbabot, the enterprising head of the Contra Costa Waterworks 
Company, and owner of lakes Chabot and Temescal, is trying an experi- 
ment with tea plants at the latter place. He has planted most of the 
southern slopes of the hill-sides adjoining the lake with tea. Although 
the plants are only a year old they look flourishing, and are doing well. 
The variety sown is that grown in the hill districts of China and Japan, 
which come as near as possible to the latitude of Temescal. There have 
been several attempts made to grow tea in Southern California, and in 
Florida and Georgia, but with poor success. However, Chabot may have 
been lucky enough to have struck just the right locality. If so, there will 
be a big rise in the price of land around the Temescal hills. The tea- 
plants at Temescal are attended to by Chinamen who have had experience 
in such matters at borne, and the Celestials are most sanguine of success. 
As the tea-plant does not mature for three years, there will be some little 
time to wait before we taste the " new chop " from Temescal. 



If yon want to get a delicacy which will tempt the sickest appetite, 
obtain some of those delicious Mobile Oysters sold by Moraghan, stalls 
Nos. 0"8 and 69 California Market. Families supplied. 



The very choicest products of Japanese art are to be found at 
Marsh & Co.'s, No. 6'25 Market street, at reasonable prices. Examine 
them. 

The Latest Thing In Hosiery —A Christmas present. 



LIEBIG 




GEO. STREET, Agent News Letter, 30 Cornhill, E. C, London. 

COMPANY'S '. 

EXTRACT 

OF MEAT. 

Auiinal Sale, 

»,000,000 Jars. 

Finest and Cheapest 
Meat- Flavoring Stock 
for Soups, Made JDishes 
and Sauces. 

CAUTION.— Genuine ONLY with thefac simile of BA.KON LIEBIG'S Signature io 
Blue Ink acro^a Label. The title " BAKON LIEBIG" and his photograph having 
been lately largely used by dealers having no connection with BARON LIEBIG, the 
public are hereby informed that the LIEBIG COMPANY are the only manufacturers 
who are able to offer the article with BARON LIEBIG'S •{Tjarantee of genuineness. 

An invaluable and palatable tonic in all eases uf weak digestion and debility. 

** Is a suceess and a boon for which Nations should feel grateful." — See Medical 
Press, Lancet, British Medical Journal, etc. 

To be had of all Storekeepers. Grocers and Chemists. Role Agents for the United 
States (wholesale only), C. DAVID & CO., 9 Fenchurch Avenue, London, England. 

Sold Wholesale by BICHABDS & HARRISON. San Franc isco. 

THOMAS PRICE'S 

Assay Office and Chemical Laboratory, 

524 Sacramento Street, San Francisco. 

Careful Analyses made of Ores, Metals, Soils, Waters, Industrial Products, Foods, 
Medicines and Poisons. 
Consultations on Chemical, Mining uud Metallurgical Questions. 

CSJUBGES. 

ANALYSES. 
Qualitative Analysis of Ores.|;10 to $25 00 
Quantitative " " 15 to 50 00 

Qualitative Analysis of Water 25 00 

14 " 75 00 

1 Guano 25 00 

Proximate Analysis of Coal 10 00 

Quantitave " " .... 50 00 

Complete Analysis, Qualitative and 
Quantitative, of Complex Sub- 
stances, at Special Kates. 



ASSAYS. 

Gold and Silver 

Gold, Silver and Lead 5 00 

Gold, Sliver and Copper 5 00 

Cupper 3 OOJQuatititat 

Iron 3 00 

Tin 5 00 

Quicksilver 5 00 

Manganese 5 00 

Chromium 5 00 



QUICKSILVER 

FKO.iI NEW ALNADEN MINES, Santa Clara County, Cal. 

S3F Prompt Shipmeut. Lowest Price or Purest Uuiform Quality. 



P. O. BOX 2.54S. 



J. B. RANDOL, 

320 Sansome at-, San Francisco. 



L. LANSZWEERT, 

ualytlcal aucl Consulting Chemist, 360 Fourth street, 

San Francisco. July 7" 



A 



10, 188f>. 



CAM FORNIA ADVERTISKK. 



17 



NOTABILIA. 



YounK Men!— Read This.— Thi VoiTAIO l'.i.r Co., of Marshall. 
Ulofa., offer to Mod ttuir celebrated Ri paio Belt and other 

11 trial fur thirty days, bo men (young or old) 

effllutad with nervous debility, Ion of vitality end manhood, ami all kin- 
dred troobles. Alee foe rheumatism, neuralgia, paralysis ami many oth- 
ir flJMM— . Oomplete reetoraUoa to health, vigor end manhood guaran- 
tied. No rink iainoamd, ee thirty deye* trial is allowed. Write them 
at once for illustrated pamphlet free. 

Hcrr Krcutzbtibcr is a member of the secret police. Being ou his 

way home after midnight be Observes on tbfl street lamp a placard: " Ha! 

Kooodrela of Socialists have posted a placard denouncing His 

.," said Krentzhuber to himself, Being determined to destroy the 

placard he painfully climbs up the lamp-post, aud having secured the 

treasonable document he reads: " Fresh Paint." 

Catarrh Cured.— A clergyman, after suffering a number of years from 
that loathsome disease, Catarrh, after trying every known remedy with- 
out success, at last found a prescription which completely cured and saved 
him from death. Any sufferer from this dreadful disease sending a self- 
addreseed stamped envelope to Dr. J. A. Lawrence, 11)1) Dean street, 
Brooklyn, New York, will receive the recipe tree of charge. 

He entered the coal office with a small market basket on his arm. 
"Give me a ton of coal." "Yes, sir," replied the coal merchant; 
" where shall I send it?" "Oh, just put it into this basket ; I'll carry 
it home myself." " But we have a wagon right here and can Bend it up 
at once." " No. I cau carry the coal easy enough, but you might send 
the bill up in a wagon." — PottsviUe Chron. 

"Adam," says a writer, " was never troubled with dyspepsia." From 
which we iofer that Eve did not do her own cooking, but took the old 
man to Swain's Bakery, No. 213 Sutter street, San Franciac\ where de- 
licious lunches, ice-creams, pastries, confections, etc., are served at a 
moment's notice, in the most perfect style, and where the appointments 
and surroundings are all of the most reBned and luxurious character. 

'* Your wickedness will bring your father's gray hairs with sorrow 
to the grave," said an Austin school-teacher to the worst boy in school. 
"Oh, no, I guess not." "Are you going to reform, then, and lead a new 
life?" " Not much, but I'm not going to briog the old man's gray hairs 
in sorrow to the grave, for the old duffer wears a wig and belongs to a 
cremation society. — Texas Si/tings. 

Theatrical managers are endowed with rare powers. For instance, 
they can crowd more performers on a 3x5 poster than they can possibly 
get on a 40x00 foot stage. This is genius, and it is almost as good as the 
Imperishable Paint, sold by J. R. Kelly & Co., Market street, below 
Beale. The Imperishable Paint goes farther than any other paint, and 
is impervious to sun or rain. 

A young lady, whose very best young man lived over-the-way with 
his parents, took a seat by the window one cloudy morning. " Why do 
you sit by the window such a chilly morning, Laura ? " asked her mother. 
" I'm waiting for the son to come out, ma," Bhe replied. — Pitts. Tel. 

"Do you know the prisoner?" asked the judge. "Yes, sir," replied 
the witness. "What sort of a reputation has he?" "Reputation? 
First class." " What has he ever done ?" " Done ? Why, your honor, 
he killed four men in Texas with three shots, and he buys the pure and 
unadulterated liquors sold by P. J. Cassin & Co., corner of Washington 
and Battery Btreets, S. F." 

A Brooklyn girl can whistle so loud that she can stop a horae-car 
seven blocks off, and wake up the peeler sleeping in the basement on the 
other side of the square. — Lowell Citizen. 

A young married man gazed at his mother-in-law'a two trunks in 
the hall, and sadly remarked: "She has brought her clothes to a visit ; 
would that she had brought her visit to a close." And then the red-head- 
ed servant-girl gleefully remarked that Bradley & Rulofson, corner of 
Geary and Dupont streets, take moat artistic and life like photographs. 

An unfortunate cripple entered a saloon and drank several glasses of 
beer. "If I were you," remarked the saloon keeper, "I'd nut drink too 
much ; you may forget your crutches when you leave." 

Young pussons is ap' ter think dat da hab foun' a 'prubement on de 
way o' dar fadder, but de switch will alius be a powerful 'ducement fur 
er boy ter ack right. Dar am' ap'ter be no 'prubement in dat respeck, an' 
dar won't be no 'prubement on dem dar stylish hats, sold by White, No. 
G14 Commercial street. Dey can't be 'prubed on. 

Ladies love to feast their eyes upon sealskin sacques, even though they 
sea them off and very fur beyond their reach. — Chicago Sun. 

No sufferer from any scrofulous disease, who will fairly try Ayer's 
Sarsaparilla, need despair of a cure. It will purge the blood of all im- 
purities, thereby destroying the germs from which scrofula is developed, 
and will infuse new life and vigor throughout the whole physical or- 
ganization. 

It Is said that a goose drinks water one hundred times a day. Some 
geese don't drink water at all. — Drake's Trav. Magazine. 

Some say " consumption can't be cured." Ayer's Cherry Pectoral, as 
proved by forty years' experience, will cure this disease when not already 
advanced beyond the reach of medical aid. Even then its use affords 
very great relief, and insures refreshing sleep. 

Keep money out of marriage copartnership — matrimony, acrimony, 
alimony. — Merck. Trav. 

A baby-carriage is pretty sure to be struck by a squall. 

J. F. Cutter's Old Bourbon. — This celebrated Whisky is for sale by 
all tirst-class druggists and grocers. Trade mark — star within a shield. 

Best Pictures taken at the Imperial Gallery, 724^ Market St., S. F. 



REAL ESTATE TRANSACTIONS. 

Recorded In the Oltyand County of San Francisco. California, for 
the Week ending January 6, 1884. 

CV vipile ifromtht Rteordaqftiu Cotnmcrcial A<jeticy t U)l C<U\foniiaSt.,S.K 



Wednesday, December 3 let. 



HKANTOKANI) ORANTEE. 



DESCRIPTION. 



P Lev J to M Loflus 

C G Ewlng to E II Hammer., 
C Joseph to V B Masaou 



J T Boyd el al to A Uayward.. 



W J Gorman to Katie E Riesor.. 

Jane A Brickwedel to Catfa Bigley 

CG Howard to Helena Howard.. 
Jennie Smith to Delia Kelly 



A A Levi to Margt Gruber 

Rispnb Traylor to Elizlh U Traylor 



A J Coghill to Mary C Wattles.... 
WH Coghill to Same 



W Guerrero, 186:6 • 83th, a 50x100, be- 
ing i HA 81 

Be silver, 339 en 2nd, sw 2S:6x76i being 

in llM-vara SO 

Nw Stockton aud ".roadway, n 16x68 fl 
— olLvara 82 ; subject to a mortgage 
of #2 >,O00 

Nw Octavia and Greenwich, n 00, bw 
121, Be 44:0, c lis to beginning, being 
in W A 187 

N 19th, 125 w Valencia, w 25x100, be- 
in" in M B 71 

Sw Grove and Fillmore, e 50x122:6, be- 
ing in W A 3U7 

E Kearny, 50:0 n Sottcr, n 20:0x40 

N Valleju, 75 c Leavenworth, e 25x100: 
0-50- vara 885 

Sw Fulton and Brodorick, e 50x100, be- 
ing in W A 528 



N Broadway, 187:6 w Buchanan, w 137: 
6x275 -W A 265; iw Fillmore and 
Fullou. s6S:9xl37:6, being in W Ad- 
dition .^66 

SClay, 201:2 wTaylor.w 25x120 

S Clay, 176:2 w Taylor, w 25x120 



# 5 

3,000 



Gift 
Gift 



3,700 
2,600 



4,285 
7,500 
5,700 



Friday, January 2nd. 



E E Meyer to M F Stegelitz 

P Mulstay to M Greenwood 

C E Livcrmore to S F Hubley 

A Borel to J Sullivan 

J W Cudworlh to U Diederich.... 

C S Schmidt to M C Ford 

I FBIocb to W Hagan 



W Stanyan, 303:0 » Sullivan, e 23x111:6 
lot 30, Meyer'y Garden ... . 

S Jackson, 117:3 w Maple, w 20:6x127:8 
-W A 843 

W Chattanooga, 7S s 21st, s 26x125, be- 
ing in MB 89 

E Folsom, 175 g 25th, s 25x112:6, being 
in M B180 

Se Greenwich and Fillmore, 8 30x82:6— 
W A 321 

Lot51.blk 192, Central Park Home- 
stead 

N 17th, 407 e Douglass, e 37x260, being 
in M Block 



-■? 400 

500 

400 

950 

1,500 

1 

1,000 



Saturday, January 3rd. 



E T Briggs to Mary Creighton 

W Sullivan et al to nannah Daley 

S Bear to Louisa Abranis 

CRickoffto E E Hildebrand 

P J McGovern to C Edmunds 

T N McQuade to M Haley 

L L Robinson to M Greenwood... 

J A Shcpston to K Lorctz 

A Borel 10 Felice Ghio 



Sw 2nd, 175 e Harrison, se 35x90, being 
in 100-vara 70 ; subject to a mort- 
gage of #1,500 

Se Tehama, 525 sw 5tb, sw 25x80, being 
in 100-vara 201 

Se O'Farrell and Octavia, e 137:6x120— 
W A 154 -. 

Sw 7th, 25 nw Natoma, nw 50x75, be- 
ing in 100-vara 200 

Sw 16th street and Hoff avenue, w 32: 
6x97 -M 3 40 

Se Howard, 325 ue 7th, ne 25x85, being 
in 100-vara 239 

N Clay, 268:1 e 1st avenue, w 28:5x127:8 
-W A849 

Lots 4, 5, 8 aud 9, block 7, West End 
Map No 2. 

E Folsom, 200 8 25th, s 50x112:0, being 
in M B 180 



#2,700 
2,250 
4,000 
10,000 
13,500 
8,550 
5 
2,700 
1,900 



Monday, January 5th. 



W Wallace toTJPyne.... 

C H King to L Rodgers 

LRodgerstoL Gottig 

G H Gray to G Edwards 

T Hopkine to J Schroth 

G Pulscben to C G Haake. . . 
B Kelsey et al to R Sinnott.. 



T Magee to P Lamb.. 



W Lyon, 45 n Geary, n 25x100, being 
in W Addition 

Sw Chattanooga and 23rd, s 83x125 
— H A65 

Sw Chattanooga and 23rd, s 88x125, be- 
ing in H A 05 

E Shotwell, 195 s 20th, s 20x100, being 
in M B56 

Se Guerrero and 22nd, e 50x114, being 
in HA 13 

Ne 3rd, 20 se Harrison, ee 35x57:6, be- 
ing in 100-vara 78 

Se Clipper and Guerrero, 8 13:8, e 145, 
ne 1S:8, w 150 to beginning, beiug in 
BAS 

W Harrison. 45 n 25lh, u 25x112:6, be- 
inginM B 173 



I 10 

3.00U 

3,000 

5 

2,8 
5 



Tuesday, January 6th. 



W Baker, 75 n Page, n 60x103, being 
in W A 597 

Nw Tehama, 480 sw 1st, sw 25x80, be- 
ing in 100-vara 47 

Nw Howard.275 ne 6th, ne 31:3x30, be- 
ing in 100-vara 203 

Nw McAllister and Lolt, w 25x120, be- 
ing in W Addition 

N Ellis, 55 w Pierce, w 27:6x100, being 
in W A430 

N Sacramento, 118:9 w Webster, w 25 
128-WA315 

N Sacramento, 118:9 w Webster, w 25 

x 128-W A 315 

M Loftus to Nellie J Simons I W Guerrero, 151:6 n 28lh, s 25x100, be- 
ing in H A 37 

N Columbia, 100 w Valencia, w 79x115 
— MB78 

S Pacific, 117:6 w Stockton, w 20x78- 
50-vara 85 

Sw Powell and Vallejo, w 137:6, s 108: 
6. e 68:9, n 26:6, e 08:9, n 82 to begin- 
ning— 50- vara 165 



T "Magee et al to P Creigh ton ... , 
M J Uolden 10 M J Saunders 

CRickhoff toGHarshall 

L Blegis to BHealey 

M Murray io Sol Levy 

D E Cornfoot to Mary Talbort.. 
M Rosenthal to D E Cornfoot ... 



LGottigtoC Hocuna 

E Gcnty to E M Thompson 

W W Minor to W B Galloway. 



#2,800 
4,000 

12,550 
1,500 
4,0"0 
Gift 
2,500 
2,400 



20 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Jan. 10, 1885. 



COMMENTS ON FOREIGN AFFAIRS. 
Another dynamite outrage occurred in England last week. Like 
moat of its predecessors it was insignificant in its results and important 
only as an evidence of the existence of an organized spirit c< 
which nothing but sheer cowardice, and the incapacity which 



therefrom, prevents accomplishing serious crimes. 

L — .. — __ a ,-(.;„ a me re question of time when, it tnis 



CRADLE, ALTAR, AND TOMB. 



of evil, 
arises 
There is no lane so 
long'thaTit'lias no turning," and iUs a mere question l 
tbiSg is continued, one of these dynamite scoundrels will succeed in de- 
stroying hislown life in addition to those of many worthy persons When 
that day comes the American people will view with shame the fact that 
their Government has systematically avoided taking such action as 
would tend to terminate the construction, in this country, of villainous 
plots against the lives and property of a friendly people, who are allied 
to us by tieB of blood, language and institutions. 

The British Government has rejected proposals looking to the holding 
of another International Conference in regard to Egyptian affairs out- 
side of London. Closely following this, however there are rumors of an 
understanding having been almost arrived at between France and Eng- 
h\nd in regard to the matters in dispute. If these two powers should 
settle the differences which exist between them upon this question the 
Egyptian difficulty might be regarded as adjusted, because all the other 
objectors base their objection to the British proposals on the dissatisfac- 
tion of France. One thing is certain, and that is, that John Bull is get- 
ting heartily sick of the way in which he has been badgered lately in re- 
gard to this and other matters, and in his illness he is liable to do some 
goring. Such treatment has always affected him that way in the past, 
and the bovine spirit has not lost its pluck, nor the bovine horn its 
fighting power. 

There seems to be no doubt but that there are serious differences of 
opinion in the British Cabinet in regard to many of the most serious 
questions in the public policy of the day. A notable instance , of this is 
on the question of renewing the Crimes Act in Ireland. The Lord 
Lieutenant and the Irish Chief Secretary insist upon this, while, on the 
other hand, the proposal is vigorously opposedby the radical members of 
the Ministry. At this great distance it is difficult to say which side is 
ri«bt There is no doubt but that the statue is repulsive to every senti- 
nTent of British jurisprudence. It was an extraordinary measure, de- 
signed to meet an extraordinary condition of affairs— a condition under 
which ordinary laws were perfectly useless as a protection to life and 
property. The question now is-has that condition of affairs passed ? 
The comparatively peaceful state of Ireland, for a considerable period of 
time past, would seem to indicate that it had, and that the ordinary 
laws should be sufficient for the maintenance of order and the protection 
of life and property. The Lord Lieutenant and his Secretary, however, 
seem to think differently. They should know, or else they are grossly 
incapable of filling their positions. 

There seems to be no doubt but that Gladstone is in ailing, if not failing 
health He is now quite an old man, and he never was particularly 
robust. It need surprise no one, therefore, if, upon the passage of the 
Redistribution Bill, he Bbould retire from the cares of office. In that 
case Chamberlain would be likely to succeed to the leadership of the 
Ministry and as Chamberlain is an advanced and vigorous radical, there 
is a prospect of lively times ahead for the Liberal party. In fact, a 
broad probability of considerable of a disruption stares it in the face, for 
unless Chamberlain goes slow, the m oderate Liberals will not follow him. 

OBITUARY. 
John Wleland and Daughter.— The accident which occurred at the 
residence of this gentleman yesterday one week ago, and which resulted 
in the death of himself and his daughter, was one of the most tragic and 
deplorable events which have occurred in San Francisco for a long time 
past The deceased gentleman was a resident of this city for a great num- 
ber of years, and by his energy, shrewdness and industry had built up a 
large business and acquired a large quantity of wealth. The respect and 
esteem in which he was held by his fellow men was indicated by the great 
array of people who followed his remains to their final resting-place on 
last Wednesday. No purely private citizen of San Francisco ever had 
such a funeral before in this city. The deceased was 55 years of age, and 
a native of Wurtemburg, Germany; his daughter was 19, and a native of 
thia city. 

W D. Heath.— This gentleman, who tor many years past has occu- 
pied the position of President of the Bank of Chico, died at the residence 
of his sister, Mrs. Conly, in this city on Wednesday. He was born m 
this city in 1853, and fell a victim to consumption. He has left behind 
him a large circle of friends to mourn his untimely loss. 

Samuel Wetherlll.— Probablv one of the best known and most popu- 
lar men on this Coast was " Sam" Wetherill, who paBsed over to the 
Bilent majority on Wednesday last. He came to this Coast in 1858, and 
was thereafter engaged in politics and theatrical management m this 
State and in Nevada. Latterly Mb habitB of life were less correct than 
they might have been, and this, probably, hastened his death. 

David Nye.— The suddenness of the death of Captain Nye, General 
Superintendent of the North Pacific Coast Railroad, shocked, as well it 
mi"ht his many friends. The deceased was an old resident of this State, 
and for a long period was engaged in the stage business. When the 
iron horse replaced the bronco, the Captain drifted with the progress of 
the age. He was a man who was respected and esteemed by all who 

knew him. ____ 

Among the many officials who have retired from the service of the 
City and County of San Francisco, none ever stepped down and out with 
a better record than Mr. Ernest Brand, who has juBt been relieved of the 
duties of School Director. A member of a Board which was generally 
and accurately designated tough, Mr. Brand always remained honest and 
faithful in the discharge of the duties of the trust confided to him. 

We beg to call special attention the Mr. G. J. Duraind's poem, 
which is to be found in this issue. It was specially prepared for our hol- 
iday number, but was crowded out. 



CRADLE. 

ArvvoOD-In this city, Dec. 15, to the wife of Captain Charles Atwood, a Bon. 
Aronson-Iu this city, Jan. 3, to the wife of L. Arouson, a daughter. 
Carlson-Iii thiB citv, Jan. 2, to the wife of C. E. Carlson, a daughter. 
CHAFMiN-In this city, Jan 6. to the wife of W. R. Chapman, a son. 
MALLADV-In this citv, Jan. 5, to the wile of William L. Mallady, a daughter. 
Sayrb— In this city, Jan. 6, to the wife of J. H. Sayre, a son. 
West— In this city, Jan. 2, to the wife of Charles West, a son. 

ALTAR. 

BROWN-WOOD-Dec. 25. Walter E. Brown to Emma H. Wood. 
BEACH-PoPE-Jan. 6, Ransom E. Beach to Edith L. Pope, both of this city 
Hawkins-Coffin— Jan. 5, Elijah Hawkins to Mrs. Belle J. Coffm. 
Natuas-Lkvv— Jan. 4, Oscar Nathan to Tiene Levy, both of this city. 
STF.BBINS-ABKI.-Jan. 4, Albert De W. Stebbins to Annie Abel, both of this city. 
ToRKELSES-OLBES-Jan. 5, Richard Torkelsen to Josephine B. Olsen. 

TOMB. 

AiiRESB-Jan. 1, Frederick Ahrens, a native of Germany, aged 28 years. 

Bernard -Jan. 4, Charles Bernard, a native of Dinan, France, aged 5» years, 15 days. 

CowF«R-Jan. 8, JameB CowpOT, a native of Chichester, England, aged 82 years. 

EARLE-Jan 3, Mary A., wife of the late George Earle, aged 75 years and 4 months. 

GABBiEt-Jan. 5, Annie Maria Gabriel, a native of Germany, aged 54 years, 9 mos. 

GooDROM-Jan 3, Rose Ann Goodrnm, a native of England, aged 51 years, 8 months. 

Goodwin -Jan. 5, Sophia Goodwin, a native of England, aged 63 years. 

Hanson— Dec. 30, John Hanson, a native of Maine, aged 72 years and 4 months 

HeATH-Jan 6. W. D Heath, aged 33 years, 7 months and 6 davs. 

How— Jan. 3, John How, a native of St. Louis. Mo, aged 72 years. 

LANE- Jan — , Kate M. Lane, a native of New Orleans, aged 40 years and 4 months. 

MiDLiREN-Jan. 4, James H. Milliken, a native of Surrey, Maine, aged 44 years. 

Mott— Jan. 8, Julius H. Mott. 

PLA'T-Dec. 30, James M. Piatt, a native of New York, aged 76 years. 

Pinet— Jan. 7, Madame L. Pinet, wife of J. Pinet. 

Van Tassei,— Jan. 4, Charles Van Tassel, aged -.9 years. 

WiT0EN-Jan. 1, Diedrich Witgen, aged 56 years, i months and 16 days. 

WlELAND— Ian. 3, John Wieland, aged 55 years, 2 months and 27 days 

WiELA.ND-Jan. 4, Bertha W. Wieland, aged 19 years, 6 months and 3 days. 



THE DEAD-LOCK. 
The cloven foot of demagoglsm has been exhibiting itself in a very 
marked manner at Sacramento, during the past week, in the ranks of the 
Democratic party. One would almost have fancied that the Bignihcant 



for the Democratic party, would have driven these people into retirement. 
This supposition, however, was based on the assumption that " the radi- 
cal leaders," as they are pleased to designate themselves, had sufficient 
sense of shame in their composition to enable them to appreciate a re- 
buke ■ consequently it was erroneously based. It turns out that one might 
as well expect the professional thief to stand abashed at being called a 
criminal as to expect these self-appointed " leaders " to bow before the 
startling rebuff administered to them by the people, and retire to that 
obscurity tbey are so eminently fitted to adorn. _ 

Animated by disappointed ambitions, and seeking to attain base and 
selfish ends, they have labored assiduously to create a public sentiment 
anta»onistic to some of the greatest interests in the State. They cauBed 
the calling of an extra session of the Legislature, at great expense to the 
State in order to advance their own personal interests. Having, by the 
tricks' and artifices of that contemptible system of politics in which they 
are expert gained control of the machinery of their party, they cracked 
the party whip and dictated a course of idiotic and communistic legisla- 
tion which would have been acceptable to the most advanced socialist 
that ever aimed to burst organized society, with its property rights, into 
fragments. A number of the more intelligent and refined members of 
the Legislature refuBed to accept this programme and surrender the dis- 
charge of the duties of their offices to an irresponsible lobby. These gen- 
tlemen were read out of the party by the Hoodlum Convention which as- 
sembled at Stockton; and the people, at the first opportunity, repudiated 
the Hoodlum Convention and its hoodlum leaders. Nothing abashed, 
however, the little remnant of them, which popular indignation has not 
yet been able to get a whack at, step to the front, now, and demand 
that the men they attempted to read out of the party shall obey their 
behests and that, too, without the slightest recognition. It is said that 
the secret of this cheeky demand lies in the fact that the science of 
" practical politics " suggests it as a step necessary to the control, by the 
"radical leaders," of the Federal patronage— in a State which they drove 
to the other party. If Mr. Hendricks, who doesn't believe in "reform 
after the schoolmaster's fashion," but who does believe in turning the 
rascals out," and " to the victors belong the spoils, was President, this 
idea might have some weight, but, with Mr. Cleveland as President, the 
thing is different. He is unlikely to recognize either the principles of 
the science of " practical politics " or the " radicals." 

Mr. Hawthorne, chief officer of the Lord Dugerin, has been appointed 
Commander of the Star of Erin, vice Mr. RuBsell, the officer who brought 
her into port. The latter gentleman, who proved himself worthy of the 
responsible position of Captain, has, on account of his youth, un- 
fortunately, not yet completed the neceBsary legal service to permit of 
Mb retaining his well-won spurs. His record during his recent trials will, 
however, we have no doubt, do him good service in the future, and pro- 
cure for him a fitting recognition of his services from the owners of the 
vessel, who are indebted to his good judgment and skill for the salvation 
of the Star of Erin. 

The branch establishment, opened last Saturday by Gnnst & Co., 
in the old Examiner business office, Phelan Building, Market street, has, 
by reason of its beautiful and artistic appearance, been attracting univer- 
sal attention. The decorative and ornamental work, which is the chief 
source of admiration, was designed and executed by Messrs. Blum, Epp- 
stein & Marsh, and it is a job of which any firm might well be proud. 

One of the finest residence properties in Oakland is that belonging to 
the estate of the late Dr. Hugh J. Glenn. It is announced to be sold by 
public auction tomorrow week. The sale is under the charge of Mr. 
William J. Dingee, and the affable Joe. Eldridge will preside. 




Vol. 35. 



8AN FRANOISOO. 8ATORDAY. JAN. 17, 1885. 




PRICES OF LEADING STOCKS AND 00V. BONOS. 

)g> fniPi^if. .'.in. I'.. IIM, 



Ckl. Mala Boob, rOT .... 

U. 0..-M 


107) 
M 

ioa| 

too 

ltn 

119 

80 
S7J 

1" 
W 


! .1 
111 
100 

110 
«** 
<•> 
S3 

"I 

4 


"itimiiM. 


tfii. 

lis 

H 

00 
67 
08 
I US 

*' 

• 
2D 

60 
M 

110 

81 
18 
■0 

It) 


A'k.J 
118 




■ ' P. K. 11 


110 

00 






00 


l>« taakiOn i. f- i. 


ttaaVxi K. R. ... 


104 

8* 


It. K. 111. 




N"iu. 
60 


8. PL K. It...!. 



Vl'.. .ft k k ii. .i.i« 


Cmiitat'm Powdar Oo 


SO 
60 
160 




Atlantic Oianl Powder 

O..I.1 and Stock Telear*h Oo. 

!•». iflc C«t»l S. !*. Co'» Stock 
Proaldio Railroad 


66 




06 




117 


MlaCBtXAXKHa. 

P«.-ifl= Rolling MI1U. 

Cala. Dtj Dock 


88 
18 


Sale [*|.-.n Oo 


laaCRAXCl COMPAMKa. 

Flreman'a Fund (ox dlv) .. 


67( 


Vukaji l*.m.ii'» . 

Hawaiian Ooaaomretmi On.. 

Calif. run lr..h lad M.-.1 i... 


118 

ua 

107 



The dividend* paid thi* week U the leading topic of interest: 

Bank.* Call form* $1 SO per ■hart Oak Art Sum.- raving Co. l> 00 per share 

lUiik 6 00 | It It ftOpcrshare 

10 R It 80 per share 

.utw Co .. 3 OOperahir . Iiry Dock 50 per » ha re i 

... r_ h 2% KTBh*ri b-.-ii worked for years. 1 ho Keening Star is al*<. very rlen n 



FINANCIAL REVIEW. 
The mining market oontinoso dsprss— d in the absence of any im- 
portant new» Irom the II ■ ha» been an exospUoo to 
the rule, and ha* maintaine 1 oofuridei 

i ■ooifn to bo improving in the tjuijotnaj., qidto a nun' 
shares changing band* at from H 

ha* just boa levied -in poor tad Poorlooa, raepsotivoly. Latest . 
from this uemp arc very favorable. 
The S. V. Btook Kxonango Board bold its annual mooting durii 

early part of the OPOek, aud elected S. B. Wak H. L. 

V:,n \^ v k \'ii • President The retiring President, Geo, l . nan 
dent an liiUwoelhig letter to the Board, in vrhii 

that the palmy deyi ol Mm Oomotook are pa*»t. bat Looks forward, with 
bops, to the outlying di-tricta, ami moat especially to *.* 
Board seems in a very prosperous oondition, bflLog Out ol deht en< 
ry ol property worth $4'_\%,000. 

Shasta oounty mines are beginning to attract considerable >>'' 
from capitalists. The ledges, we are informed, are generally i>f immense 
widtb, and, notwithstanding the refractory ..r rebellion* i'l)»rm i 
ores can be worked to ml vantage. Some Kantern capitalists leave thi* 
city, in a few days, with a view of purchasing ■ group ol these mine*. 
The price asked in largo, and the property, wo understand, will boar in- 
vestigation. Wo bope to be able to give more definite infor .nation 
regarding these mines ami others in the oonnty in our nasi i 

Trinity r.mnty ir« wheeling into line, and A OompaDV hus 

organized for tin' pm p -•■ ol working olalmi in tho New River dJatriota 

U900 feet each, and assays ihow o yield 

running from 940 to 9100 |s-r ton in gold and allfer. Too great tronble 

at present with thin part nl tho ooanty i^ lack of oommonleation , moat ol the 

supplies, machiiiory, OtC, huviu ought in from Humboldt 

county. We have reason to believe that, recognizing the Importance of 
toil dlltriat, this drawback will be remedied in a lew month". 
In PlaoaT countv auriferous gravel mines are in high domal 
in the vicinity of Iowa Hill. The Booker Flat, moi known 

as the We«ke mine, has just been told in London Thin 

mine is situate southeast of Monona Flat, and is not far from < h 
I ing Star ami ofoming St; t r. The utter b ;i very ofofltablo mine and ni 



i > ikUml R. R !>0 )s-r share 

I- r«h»re 

CuBtre Costa Wn* i per inare 



Kir«meo"» Puntl In*. Co... 3 00 perabare 

i-rr-hire 

State Invert. Ins. Co 1 00 

California, Powder Oo ., 1 OOpernhsru 

The Inion [nenranoo Oo. an-l the Western Insurance Co. have pasaed 

their dividen-l,.. Th-- divid.-nd paid by the Pacific B:ink is for the half 
year ending the 31*1 nit. In general the volume of business has been 
very light— apparently no disposition to sell these teonrioo, nnd -till leej 
to purchase toeiD. A. Baibd, 411 Montgomery street. 



G 



OLD BAJW-yJO fine par. — KEriNEn Silvik - 16®17| t? cent, dis- 
count. Mexican Dollars. m^H.'*:. nominal. 

"Exchange on New York, 15c.@20a ; on London Bankers, 

Paris, sight. 5-12^(^5-10 francs per dollar. Telegrams < 

York, 20c. fa, 25c. 

"Price of Money here, 6@10 per cent, per year— bank rate. In the 

open market, i'q H per month. Demand fair. On Bond Security, 

5(0, r» par pent. i>"r vear. on f'^ll 1 '-maud g I, 



D No 



INSURANCE ITEMS. 

Sin co onr remarks of last week we are not in a position at present 
to give mnch new information, but at the same time we would call the at- 
tention of the general public to the body of Insurance Ooderwriten under 
the name of the " Pacific Insurance I rnion," termed In our last issue "The 
Compact." We have seen several arti rn papers concerning 

similar organizations there, and from them we gather the inference that, 
although at first insurers are antagonistic, they gradually Itecome familiar 
with the workings of them, and finally come to the conclusion that they 
are instituted both fur the benefit of the insurers and the insured. There 
are at present some companies in this city who are nut in accord with 
this organization, hut it is only a matter of time when they will gladly 
come into the fold, and reap the benefit of just and equitable rates. 

There has, we believe, been a meeting of the old and, bo to speak, le- 
gitimate brokers, who are somewhat incensed at the wholesale issuance of 
certificates to persons who are nut eligible in their ideas. How this diffi- 
culty is to be overcome we cannot at present surmise, but presume that 
their future action in this respect will throw some light upon it. 

The annual election of officers of the Fireman's Fund Insurance Com- 
pany came off last Tuesday, the loth iust., and the President and officers 
of the institution entertained their friends right royally. 

The semi-annual statement of the Nevada Bank of San Francisco 
has just been made public, and it shows that that great financial institu- 
tion is in a flourishing condition. Itn paid-up capital and reserve fund 
aggregates six million dollars, and its entire assets sum up the comfortable 
amount of close on twenty millions. Its balance sOeet shows undivided 
profits to the amount of about ninety-three thousand dollars, and it en- 
joys a continually increx^ingvolnnn^n^^iness. 

London, January 15 —Consols, 99 13-16d (3>10Q. 



gold. There i* roi.-iilerahle inquiry after bondl in tin* di*trict, and 
there is a rumor that a pretty good eum has already been offered for the 
Evening St:ir property. 

The report of the annual meeting of the Silver King Minis 
which appears In another column of this week 

ment in anything bat » uvornblfl light Direct onargei ol fraud are 
openly made ngjiiiiHt the manager of tin' mine by the attorney of certain 
stockholders, and suit i* threatened against tho Director*, for mal- 
feasance in offioo. It W0», W0 beHoVO. impolitic on the part of thi 
(lemon to refuse the requests made at the mooting by tho minority for 
an explanation of certain matters connente.1 with bho annoaj report. If 
there was any explanation due, it should have bono It there 

and then. There is nothing to gain by an exercise >>f dictatorial power, 
and Director! of mining oorporattona are very not to for: 
and their responsibility to itockholdero under tho Infinen 
vaunted superiority, bred and fostered by an inane pride of reprooi I 
for the brief t**riod ol an hour or to, some thousands of share*, often 
obtained from credulous people by false representation*. We have bad 
occasion before to allude in tbeoo columns to the evil of granting proxies, 
and especially to men who make their living as Directors aui dummy 
figure-heads in mining corporations. These individimN are as soulless as 
the corporation* they represent Nine times out of ten they aro tbo toolo 
of some thief who utiliy.es them to further bis nefarious end* Hi* will 
is their law, and they will hesitate at nothing whfoh will serve hi* end*. 
Cringing and fawning, these *«rvile things can any i I 00 our 

streets, hanging i" 00 ind their god, flattering and Cajolis 

as he sucks his golden-headed cane on some prominent corner, or 
ing the eye 01 b gnldOO the vote in the company'* offioo, 

Stockholders, to be safe, should vote their own stock, or, if they must 
give proxies, let them be given to some one in whom they can place 
reliance. 

There are very few mining companies in existence in our city to-day 
which would stand the crucial test of a legal investigation. Tb< 
ity of them are rotten to the core. How many mines are there listed 
on our board to-day which are not owned virtually by one individual. 
And be not only owns the mine but also the Directors. His name does 
not appear on the minutes of the company, yet every movement i* under 
his direction and for hi* benefit The investigation now and then into a 
mining corporation would have a good effect upon the community at 
large, especially if some of the thieves connected therewith WQ 
nered so tightly that their only choice ley between a inioidei grave or a 
lengthened retirement to the San Quentin buck fields. The honorary 
position of professional Mining Directorship might DOt then bfl in inch 
high demand, and the arch thieves would be compelled to hoe their own 
row, and take the medicine in person. 

Latest from the Merchant's Exchange.— New York, Jan. 16, 1885. 
U. S. Bonds— :ta, 101, k; 4a, 12U, ex int.; 4Ji, 112/, b. Sterling 
Exchange, 482j@486&. Western Union, 66g. Market- Firm. 

Registered at the Postofflce at San Francisco, California, as Second-Ciaas Matter. 



Printed and Published by the Proprietor, Frederick Marriott. 607 to 615 Merchant street, San Francisco, California. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Jan. 17, 1885. 



THE DAUGHTER WORKS, THE MOTHER FRAYS. 

" Don't sell him another drink, pleaBe, 

He's reeling already, you see ; 
And I fear when be comes home to-night 

He'll beat my mother and me. 
She's waiting in darkness and cold, 

And dreading to bear him come home, 
He treats us so bad when he's drunk ; 

Oh! don't sell him any more rum! 
"I beard mother praying last night, 

(She thought 1 was quite sound asleep), 
While she in sweet devotion knelt, 

She prayed God her husband to keep. 
She cried like her poor heart would break ; 

So trying to comfort her some, 
I told her I'd beg you to-day 

Not to Bell my father any more rum. 
"Why don't you have something to sell 

That will not make people so sad; 
That will not make dear mothers grieve, 

And kind father's cruel and bad ? 
Ah, me! it is hard, and I see 

You're angry because I have come ; 
Forgive a poor, sad little girl. 

And don't sell her dear father any rum." 

— C hicago Standard. 

MEN I MEET— THE JUVENILE HUSBAND. 
[By Silver Pen.] 

" There's nothing half so sweet in life as love's youne dream," 
Except, perhaps, those other dreams which every one has experienced 
going to bed Bomewhat hungry, and dreaming, dreaming, dreaming of a 
delicious supper which, the moment you expect to taste, is a disappoint- 
ment, since you instantly awake. Both the carnal and spiritual dream 
is alike unfulfilled, though, when Mr. Thomas Moore wrote the above 
little stanza, there was more truth in it than in the present day, for the 
age of chivalry has gone by, alas ! alas ! and love seems to have perished 
of cold. The love that lived through length of years, dating from the age 
of twenty to the end of life, is like a lost art, and among earth's trea- 
sures we find it no more. Dear me ! I must be growing sentimental, 
and that is far from my thoughts at this moment. I simply wish to 
show my female acquaintances how futile a thing it is to expect con- 
stancy and romance from the young husband of the present time. For 
my part I don't see how, in this enlightened age, any woman can be so 
ridiculous as to expect perfection in the average boy of twenty or twenty- 
one. 

Up to the age of thirty, men are little better than boys, you know, 
and even after that turning point more than half of them do not settle 
down. The boy who is bitten by " Love's young dream," and recklessly 
rushes into the chains of matrimony, naturally thinks at the time that 
there is only one woman in the world for him for ever and for ever — but, 
poor fellow, he forgets that he has a bushel of oats to sow, and it is hard 
to suppose he can scatter them between the time of leaving school and 
entering upon the duties of a married man at twenty, but this thought 
never crosses his mind while in love, and it is only upon reflection that 
he finds out the necessity of scattering the oats in his composition to the 
wind. With him it is a necessity, because these Boy Husbands lack the 
common Bense to bind themselves down to the matter-of-fact life of Dar- 
by and Joan. 

The young husband is in more ways than one an idiot. He marries 
almost always for love, that boiling-hot love that brooks no denial, that 
boils and bubbles up till it evaporates, leaving the kettle empty. Per- 
haps he has a beautiful wife, who is admired by others as much as by 
him, but by-and-by the beauty that conquered him palls on the sense, 
and, regardless of her happiness and love for him, he by slow degrees 
altere, possibly imperceptibly to himself, but he alters. He finds the 
evening spent with one woman irksome, and he sighs for the company of 
the "boys" with whom he had "such a devilish good time." So it 
comes about that after dinner he drops down town for " an hour," which 
gradually lengthens into two, three and four, and by this mode of pro- 
ceeding not only incenses his wife but gradually estranges her from him. 
Meantime he is very particular about this wife left alone, and if she has 
pluck enough to follow his lead and go out on her own account, he "gives 
her the devil," and is keenly alive as to what the world will say, for this 
young gentleman's " honor" is not to be compromised by an overt action 
of his neglected wife. 

The Young Husband, if a good looking man, has, of course, plenty of 
admiration from the women "on the outside," which renders him more 
of an idiot than ever. He grows enamored of himself in an extraordi- 
nary degree; thinks it a thousand pities tbat he- has " thrown away hiB 
chances," and wonders "what the devil "he got married for. The Ju- 
venile Benedict is more or less selfish. If too lazy to go out of an even- 
ing, he feels disgusted at any attempt on the part of his wife to drag 
him to ball or theatre against his will ; not that he contributes to the 
amusement of said wife by remaining at home, but simply sticks up his 
feet on a chair and either drops off to sleep till bed time, or peruses a 
novel, from which his eyes are never uplifted. Sometimes a great many 
girlB, who would make admirable wives if well used and not neglected, 
in the first instance, are driven to ruin by their Boy Husbands' indis- 
criminate acting. The Juvenile, in time, grows bo careless that anybody 
but himself is welcome to take his wife out. He goes his way, she goes 
hers, and thus it is that the misery of married life has become a public 
scandal. No man should marry until he is thirty. By tbat time he has 
ceased to bother himself about the Bhine of his boots and the twirl of his 
mustache. He grows sick of Billy girls, and looks out for a good wife 
and home comforts, i. e., that's what he ought to do ; and when a girl is 
so foolish as to tack herself to a boy who has not seen the world and 
been through the mill, she deserves all she gets after this caution. 

Williams & Norton, new Photograph Gallery, 914 Market street, be- 
tween Powell and Stockton, U6e the San Francisco Dry Plate exclusively. 



SUNBEAMS. 



"Officer, what is the charge against this woman ? " asked the Police 
Justice. " That's no woman, your Honor ; that's a man dressed up in 
woman's clothes." " How do you know?" " Why, I watched him on 
the street, and he passed four women with new Winter cloaks on, and 
never turned around to look at them." " Seventy-five and costs," 

— Chicago News. 

" George," said the young wife, " I know what Santa Clans is going to 
bring me Christmas." Do you, love — what is it?" "An elegant sealskin 
sacque, George." " You don't say so. Well, I'm glad to hear it, for it 
will save me a good deal of money." And then she went out into the 
kitchen and stepped on the cat, and gave the cook a week's notice. 

— Bos. Post. 

" No," said the dying punster, with a grim smile, "I don't object to 
flowers, but don't have any violets, please. I shouldn't care to have my 
grave violated, you know." It was immediately agreed that it was best 
that he should go. — Jios. Trans, 

"I have neither time nor inclination to pass paregorics on the de- 
ceased," remarked a Southern funeral orator. " Panegyrics," a person 
present corrected. "As you please, air," remarked the orator, stiffly ; 
"the words are anonymous." — Pitts. Tel. 

"I bope you are not cutting a friend," said a neighbor to the farmer, 
who was scratching the back of a pet pig with a stick. Bristling up with 
indignation the soil-tiller replied: "No, sir; I'm only scraping an ac- 
quaintance. — N. Y. Jour. 

"He tried to kiss me, and I just told him to behave," said an irate 
young lady, after a sleighride down the road the other day. " Well, did 
he kiss you ? " asked her friend. " No, the idiot, he behaved." ' 

— Prov. Tel. 

"John," said Mrs. Bascom to her husband, " I intend to return some 
visits this afternoon. Won't you step down to the stable and tell them 
to send up a carte-de-visit, with a driver? " — Bar. Free Press. 

"Why do you put that nickel with a hole in it in the contribution 
box ? " asked one man of another. " Because I could not put the hole in 
without the nickel, and I had to put in something." — St. Louis Mag. 

An Exchange has an article on " The rise of the roller rink." This 
ought to confirm the theory of the young man new to the rollers that the 
floor flew op and hit him in the b»ck of the neck. — Oil City Blizzard. 

One of Wagner's compositions is called " Gotterdammerung,'' and it is 
said that several persons have become insane listening to it. If it means 
what it sounds like, nobody can be blamed at getting mad. — Peck's Sun. 

"I wish 1 were a muff," said a disgusted poker player. " Why so ? " 
inquired his astonished friend. " Because then I might have a chance of 
holding a fair hand once in awhile." — Judge. 

"You want to aim very low when hunting bison," said the old hunter. 
" How low ?" asked the tenderfoot. " Buffalo," replied the old hunter, 
without a struggle. — Bur. Hawkeye. 

A Madison-street girl's answer to the current conundrum: "Will 
the coming man work ?" is " He will if I get him." — Wilmington Star. 

A new thick Guipure for trimming woolen costumes is called " Khar- 
toum." It ought to be most awfully cheap, it has fallen bo often. 

— Bur. Hawkeye. 

Benjamin Smith, of Dubuque, bet S50 he could hold up a weight of 
800 pounds. He lost the 650, but he had an elegant funeral. 

—Phil. Call. 

Stanley, the explorer, has received ninety-five resolutions of thanks 
and one hundred and fifty complimentary dinners, and is not dead vet. 

— Phil. Call. 

A policeman is a curious creature. He knows a rogue when be sees 
him, but very often he doesn't seize a rogue when he sees him. — Judge. 

Alice (who has been taught that God sees everything) — " I don't sink 
dat Dod's eye could see ze butter on dat bwead." — Life. 

No one knows how often Rebecca went to the well before she caught 
on. —Pitts. Tel. 

A man is called a confirmed liar when nothing that he says is con- 
firmed. — Bos. Trans. 

The Finances of Germany are in bad shape. The other Nancies 
are all right. This paragraph is strictly humorous. — St. Paul Herald. 

Vassar girls do not knead anything — not even bread. — Som. Jour. 



Save money and get the best! Burnett's Standard Flavoring Ex- 
tracts are of triple strength, and pure fruit extracts. For flavoring, use 
one-quarter the quantity of the ordinary extracts offered for sale. 



BURR BEDS! 



The Only Successful and Satisfactory FOLDING BED ever made. 
No Trouble. Opens and Closes with Bedding and Pillows all 
in place. THTRTY STYLES— from $30 TTp. 

MANTEL FOLDING BEDS from $15 Up 



BE. H. GEOSS, 

16 ;ni<l IS Second Street, S. IT. 



Jan. 17, 1880. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



SOCIETY. 



January 15, 1SS5. Rain, fosj end occasional gleams of sunshine make 
up the *um ol our existence just now, and tin- damp ol tin* atmosphere, 
i Inn degree, seems to affect the spirit of society, for the 
i) lack in spirit, and there i* a general limpness noticeable 
at them .ill. I never knew a winter when ■ "ir aooiatty baa entered into 
party (riving with les.s heart, entertaining, apparently, more as a duty 
than a pleasure, 

II. .\.\,t. tin- week ha.* been well rilled with gaieties of one .kind or 
another, nearly every day ami evening having its appointed fete. On 
Thursday evening took place Mrs. Ladde dinner, given in honor of 
>r Cbaa. warren Stoddard, now here aa a bird of passage, and 
the very pleasant little dame, given by Miss Ethel Heaver, at her home 
on T ft lor street i In Friday evening the second of the < 'ticket i Hub ger- 

iii. ui- i-.iiue on* .it l» ii ii I'.'rith Hall. and. although the delay of nearly an 
hour in the laid d.«wn time for commencing the dance was regarded, by 
\a a gradual approach to "later hours " in the future, it has been 
positively promised that it shall not occur again. Mr. Ed. Sheldon once 
mi. re proved himself the efficient leader that he has always been in the 
evening was such a complete success it was with regret that 
(for once) supper hour arrived, as, with the announcement, the dancing 
Oame to an end. Mrs. Hopkins also gave her first large dinner since her 

r.'turii here. 

Saturday was again devoted to the afternoon hop at Angel Island. 
which. In spite of the really inclement weather, was unexpectedly well 
attended. Mrs. Kantz is once more to be found among " the ladies of 
Angel [eland," and her presence aeema to infuse new life into the partieB 
there, which, during her absence, appeared to lack the spirit of former 
days. (In Sunday, the Spanish Church, on Broadway, was filled with a 
large throng, called there to listen to the mass of Mr. Edward Masten. 
Trinity Church also had a larger congregation than usual, the attraction 
being the splendid bass notes of Signor Campobello, who sang, as an 
offertory, "ThnsSaith the Lord." 

Monday more dinners, and a couple of lunches were given, and on 
Tuesday, besides another of her weekly dinners at Mrs. Gordon Bland- 
ings, Mrs. ( His opened her doors for the first time this winter, and gave 
one of thoy pleasant parties for which she has always been noted — I call 
them pleasant advisedly, as at them all ages and tastes can be satisfied in 
the choice of companionship, for the guests are nut exclusively composed 
of young people, as ia so often the case nowadays, but a happy blending 
of youth and age is made, and the result is very pleasing. I had the good 
fortune, on that oecasiou, to meet many old friends whom I had not run 
across previously this winter, as, for instance, Mr. John Perry and hia 
pleasant little wife, who was quite chatty on the subject of their recent 
Eastern visit Among the younger guests, many pretty faces were seen, 
but I think Mrs. Fax m Atherton carried away the palm from all com- 
petitors, and I have seldom seen her look more lovely. The house was 
entirely thrown open, aad though the floral adornments were not profuse, 
they were very tasteful, and the graceful smilax draped chandeliers and 
picture frames, etc. Mrs. Otis received her guests in the room to the 
left of the entrance, those across the wide h ill being devoted to the danc- 
ers, who, however, as the evening wore on, encroached on the domains 
which were not strictly theirs. 

Wedneaday were married Mr. Rose, of Los Angeles, son of one of the 
nhlest residents of that county, and Miss Fanny Fargo, a popular belle 
of several seasons back; and at Mrs. Fair's the Euthuno Club met for the 
third time this season. Luckily the night was rainless, thus doing away 
with the necessity for an awning down that apparently interminable flight 
of Bteps, which, when spread over similar ones, always makes me feel as 
if I were entering a mining shaft, and serves as a tunnel for whatever 
cold, damp wind there may be stirring. Inside the house there wa3 light 
and warmth in abundance, and the same lavish display of floral decora- 
tion which is a distinguishing feature of all Mrs. Fair's parties. Truly, 
the Club should feel moat devoutly thankful to their hostess of last night 
for one of the most complete and pleasant parties of the season. 

Among the newest engagements reported and announced are those be- 
tween Mr. Henry Newhall and Miss Wyatt, and Mr. Ralph Selby and 
Miss Fanny Adams, both of Menlo Park. The marriage of Mr. William 
Hoff Cook and Miss Mollie Edmonds, of Oakland, will take place there 
early next month. 

The young ladies of St. John's Church, on Post street, have been busily 
engaged lately in preparing an entertainment for the benefit of the church 
fund, but, owing to some misunderstanding with "the powers," it came 
very near coming to naught. At this juncture Mrs. John McMullin 
came forward, assumed chief management and the entire responsibility, 
and everything promised well for a most successful and charming kettle- 
drum, to be given at B'nai B'rith Hall next week. But now, unfortu- 
nately, comes the death of Dr. Scott, the venerable pastor of the church, 
to again mar their efforts, and this time there will probably be an entire 
abandonment ot the idea, owing to Mrs. McMullin's contemplated de- 
parture from San Francisco. 

It has been with sincere regret that the news of Dr. Scott's death has 
been received by the community at large, for the reverend gentleman was 
a very great favorite, especially with his own parishioners, who will truly 
mourn his loss. Another effect produced by it will be the postponement 
of his granddaughter, Misa Bessie Kittle's wedding, which was to have 
taken place at St. John's Church next week, and, though fears of this 
have been felt for some time past, owing to Dr. Scott's state of health, 
hopes have at the same time been entertained that he would rally suf- 
ficiently to give the young couple his blessing at the appointed time. 

More pilgrims to New Orleans are announced in the persons of Mr. and 
Mrs. Charles Josselyn, who left last week, and the McMullinB, who leave 
next month. The Clark-Crockers are on their way back from there, and, 
with their party, will arrive to-morrow. Mrs. Bradley and Miss Grace 
are there en penncnance until after the Mardi Gras, at all events. 

Mrs. Parrott and a portion of her family have taken rooms at the Oc- 
cidental Hotel, where they will remain several weeks, while her house in 
the country is being renovated and painted. In the meantime, Mr. and 
Mrs. Payson have gone East on a visit to the Payson family. Judge and 
Mrs. Hayne were in Paris when last heard from. Mrs. John McMullin 
and her daughters purpose leaving us at an early day, going first to New 



Orleans for the exhibit! thence to New y,, r k, and Bully to Europe 

for a year or more. Another pie ostto the looiety of 'Frisco. 

She lias given several pleasant dinner parties in her r oe 

Hotel during the lust, two weeks. The Risings, who have been expected 
from \ irgima I 'ity for some time past, are with uh at lout, and ar* at the 
I alaoe Hotel for the rest of the Mason. 

I am -lad to say that Mr. Hall McAllister, whofe recent illness has 
been causing his friends some uneasiness, is on the road to recovery, and 
hopes soon to be himself once more— a hope echoed by all who know 

him— as we could ill afford to lose him. I also hear that the uncomforta- 
ble attack of rheumatism which haw deprived Society of Mis., i 
Gwln thiH Winter is yielding to treatment, and we may aee her vet before 
the season ends. Fiiix. 

PHYSICALLY SAVED -MORALLY DAMNED. 

A well-known and wealthy citizen of San Francisco, who is inter- 
ested, to a large extent, in mining, and takes periodical trips to look per- 
sonally after those interests, had occasion, not long since, to absent him- 
self for a few days on that business. Besides being the possessor of a 
good large banking account and a fine residence in one of our most aristo- 
cratic neighborhoods, this gentleman is also blest with a charming wife. 
The lady moves in the very best San Francisco society, and holds a po- 
sition there that only wealth and accomplishments can obtain. And 
now we must introduce a third character, of the male sex, upon the 
scene. He is a member of one of our moat prominent clubs, and also a 
Bociety man. For sometime past bis attentions to the mining man's wife 
have been somewhat marked, but not sufficiently so to set the ever-ready 
tongue of scandal a wagging. During the receut absence of the husband, 
already alluded to, upon one of his mining trips, the gentleman in ques- 
tion called upon the fair wife. The evening passed so pleasantly that no 
record was kept of time, and the visitor, on looking at his watch, discov- 
ered that he had missed the last car which took him to his house, Borne 
long distance away. 

A remedy, however suggested itself ; he became the self-elected deputy 
of the husband, and stayed all night. Just as the gray dawn of a Winter 
morning was struggling through the blinds which guarded the desecrated 
chamber from the eyes of the vulgar and inquisitive, the deputy husband 
awoke, felt a horrible sense of dizziness and suffocation, and rushing to 
the windows threw them all open. Then, to his surprise, he discovered 
that in turning out the gas, through some faulty arrangement of the key, 
he had turned it out and partially on again. As soon as he had slightly 
recovered, he turned to the bed, and was horrified to find his hostess in- 
sensible and to all appearances dead. Hastily jumping into his clothes, 
he summoned the maid servant, and telling her to go at once to her mis- 
tress's room, rushed out to find a doctor. The medical man arrived just 
in time, after several hours' hard work, to resuscitate the lady, and, so far 
as is known, the husband is still in blissful ignorance of the indiscretion 
which came so near making him a widower. "Where ignorance is bliss, 
'tis folly to be wise?" 

PROFESSIONAL JEALOUSY. 

The petty tricks and dishonorable devices resorted to by some 
professional musicians, in order to injure and decry the reputation of 
rivals, are contemptible to a degree which is disgusting to contemplate. 
A recent occurrence in this city strikingly illustrates this well-known 
fact. Last week, Miss Susie Blair, a pupil of Professor Goffrie {who has 
won great renown in this country and in Europe as a violinist and 
a teacher of the violin), gave a concert, in which she made her debut, 
at Piatt's Hall. At this concert a Mr. J. H. Rosewald, also a profes- 
sional violinist, was present, and occupied a box, in company with the 
person who represented the Alto, in a critical capacity. This critic evi- 
dently took*his inspiration from the expert who sat by his side. The re- 
sult is a critiBcism in last Sunday's Alta, in which it is intimated broadly 
that the young debutantee possessed considerable native talent, but that 
her instructor had developed her natural powerB in a most imperfect man- 
ner ; that she had been taken into the classics before she had been taught 
the rudiments, etc. In fact, the alleged criticism was simply, from begin- 
ning to end, a covert attack upon the professional reputation of Professor 
Goffrie, and indeed, it was so malignant in its tone that the Professor's 
daughter, a pianiste of acknowledged standing and reputation, and Miss 
Van Arnam, a pupil of his daughter, were accused of being unable to 
play or sing. For any man laying claim to gentility and pursuing a rep- 
utable vocation, to use such means of hurting another professional gen- 
tleman is dishonorable in the extreme. 



Mr. Geo. M. Pinney, once of California, is in London with a grand en- 
terprise for the enrichment of the British public. 



CsUf&?t&<, 




t<zae/. 



LJux*np<Lqiied. 



^ 






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v** 



*t°» >f 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. AND 



Jan. 17, 1885. 



SHORT STORIES. 

[From the pen of the News Letter Novelist.] 



Senatorial Poles and Folers. 

Scene I.— Perkins' Headquarters at SacrameDto. Boxes of cigarB ly- 
ing around in confusion. All hands smoking. 

"Ames, old boy, hand me that tape-line, will you!" said George C. 
Perkins, with one of those happy Oroville smiles, which reached from the 
butt of his right ear, via his chin, to the subsoil roots of his left au- 
ricular. 

" Cert., Perky," answered Ames, as he reached into hia coat-tail pock- 
et and produced the object desired ; " what ye going to do— measure your 
pole again ? " 

" Ay, my boy ; that's the very idea that is dancing a Scotch reel in 
my noggin. During the period of adjournment I've carefully estimated 
the hight of yonder Senatorial persimmon, and by Badlam's burn?ides, I 
suspect that my pole is a trifle short. Lend a hand here, Basset, and you, 
Booth, take this end of the measure. Ames, my man, note down the 
figures as I call them off. Now, then, all ready? 

"Ay, ay, sir! " sang the trio of lieutenants in chorus ; " blaze away! " 

" Four and a half twain! — six two and a twain four! — five ten and a 
half ! — mark twain! " 

"Hold on, Perky!" yelled Ames, in consternation. "What in the 
n?me of Sargent's socks, are ye giving us? 'Four and a half twain! ' 
Translate it into broken English, won't you ? I don't exactly Burround 
such lingo! " 

"Ha! ha! ha!" laughed George C, giving his pantaloons a running 
half-hitch; "so you don't, Ames. You were never a rover o'er the 
briny waves of Suisun Slough. Hence, you don't catch on to sailor talk. 
I'll speak in the political dialect. Sixteen votes — plus one to carry — and 
Butte county on the ragged edge — three doubtful in Amador — put on the 
screws — and ten from San Francisco — subtract eight and divide the pot! " 

" Bravo! " yelled Booth ; " the pole is just two thousand five hundred 
and ten political chances too short! Sometimes those chances accumulate 
rapidly, and probably the fruit's ours! " 

" Think you so, good Booth— think you so ? But silence, boys, on your 
lives! Here comes Estee! " 

[Enter M. M. (Many Mistakes) Estee, holding in his left hand a coil 
of rope.] 

" A merry morning to you, Est. Hope I see you! " said the Ex-Gov- 
ernor, grinning a great grin and holding out his fist. 

" Good morning to you, George," said Estee, solemnly ; "Ames, Booth 
and Bassett, the top of the day to you! " 

"Why, friend Estee," said George C., with another smile, "do you 
carry a rope with you? — do not contemplate hanging yourself, do you ? 
Ha! ha! ha!" 

"Ha! ha! ha!" laughed Ames, Booth and Bassett. (Everybody 
laughs at Perkins' jokes.) 

"Not by a jug-full, replied Estee; " though I'm willing to lend this 
cord to any of my opponents who may wish to use it for suicidal purposes. 
L've just been measuring my pole." 

"Ah! " said Perkins ; how does it tally ? " 

" Tallies to a hair. The persimmon just now hangs Sargent east by 
Stanford west. By standing on Parks' ear and giving at anti-monopoly 
jump, I can just graze the skin of it." 

"Booth (aside): " Devilish close call." 

Bassett {sotto voce): "Yes; we better get a bag and stand directly un- 
der. If he knocks it loose we can catch it." 

" But," said Estee, giving a tremendous sigh, "there's one difficulty in 
the way." 

" Ha!" said the quartette in a breath : " what is it ? " 

" Parks won't let me climb on his ear!" 

Ames (in a whisper): " that Parks is a dandy, ain't he ? " 

Perkins (chuckling): " He's a regular daisy. I'll invite him up into our 
good society to-morrow." (Aloud, to Estee): "Well, Morris, don't give 
up the fight. Remember the old woman's maxim, 'Every little helps.' 
If you need elevation, call on me and I'll lend you a sheet of paper to 
stand upon. Have a cigar ? " 

" Thanks," said M. M., bowing. " Come into my room this afternoon 
and take a nip at the block bottle." And Mr. Estee slung his rope over 
his shoulder and departed. 

[Slow curtain. Perkins and his aids dancing the Highland Fling], 



Scene II.— Sargent's Tent. The Ex-Senator walking the floor in agi- 
tation. Bemis, McCulloch and Drew in the background. 

" By the belly of Bismarck, this delay in organization is enough to dis- 
gust an ordinary politician and give him the gangrene ! " said A. A. Sar- 
gent, stamping his foot in indignation. 

"That's a fact," said C. C. Bemis. " Especially since our pole is all 
prepared, and is sufficiently long to knock the persimmon on the first 
bout. If they postpone operations much longer the infernal tree may 
grow an inch higher, and the fruit get out of our reach. " 

"No danger of that," said Sam McCulloch, chipping cheerily in ; "I 
have girdled the trunk, and there ain't sufficient sap in the branches to 
cause a perceptible growth. We've got the yellow boy, if the circus man- 
agers will only give the word to pole." 

" Give me your band, Sam, old boy," said Sargent, brightening up ; 
"your words give me joy. But are you sure, boys, that the pole is suffi- 
ciently lengthy ? " 

" Sure ! " said M. M. Drew ; " why, I'd be willing to bet a year's sal- 
ary that it is long enough and to spare. You'll knock the prize in the 
first round, as Bemis says. 

" ' Be sure you're right, then go ahead,' is a good motto. It won't do 
any harm to be cautious ; so suppose we measure the pole again ? " said 
Sargent. 

"Agreed. Fetch the yard stick, Drew. Now, McCulloch, get out 
your pencil and mark the result," said Bemis, rolling up his sleeves. 
"Twenty-eight, with a clerkship to spare — thirty-two and fifteen thou- 
sand — Parks still firm — tally one — Alameda solid— a clear majority in the 
sack — keno ! " 



"Hip! hip! hurrah!" sang the trio in one voice, as the result was an- 
nounced. Three cheers for Senator A. A. Sargent!" 

" Easy, boys, easy," said the Ex-Minister, his face beaming with satis- 
faction. " I'm convinced we've got the thing dead. Come, let us inter- 
view the butler. We'll have to kill the time as best we may till the rep- 
resentatives of the people sound the trumpet." 

[Tableau— All hands drinking champagne, with ten political sacks piled 
in a beautiful pyramid on the table]. 



Scene III. — The persimmon tree. Polers standing with eyes strained 
and poles in hand. A vast concourse of spectators awaiting the result 
with bated breath. 

" Hast thou rosined my pole, Badlam? " asked George C. Perkins, smil- 
ing in Bpite of his anxiety. 

"Ay, sir, that have I," responded Aleck ; " and more than that, I've 
fixed a sharp nail in the end, so that you can stab the persimmon and 
bring it down without its falling. It's a cold day when we get left, 
Georee. " 

"Thanks, my noble mate. I shall reward thee right loyally for thy 
fealty. Pass me the bottle a minute. I feel yet nervous, and would 
strengthen myself for the supreme effort." 

Estee (in au undertone to Hurlburt): "Is Parks still fractious? Doth 
he refuse to lend me his ear ? " 

"Alas, good friend, he is still implacable. He saith he doth not itch 
for the ear-ache, and besides hath not served an apprenticeship as a step- 
ladder, and doth not wish to be climbed." 

" Then I do fear me for the result." 

"Courage, ray friend. Remember thou hast on rubber boots, and 
canst spring an inch or two at a pinch." 

" I will do my best. Hand me the pole." 

" Shannon," said Sargent, speaking in a whisper to his henchman, " art 
sure the shakiog which thou gaveat the tree this morning loosened the 
persimmon?" 

" Right sure, good master," answered Shannon. "The fruit hangeth 
as by a single hair. One touch from thy pole, though it be light as the 
stroke of a humming-birds wing, will bring the vermilion beauty to tuy 
feet. All is set." 

"Then the game is ours. Give me my weapon." 

[The trumpet sounds, and George C. Perkins steps smilingly up to the 
poling place. With a mighty swing he vaults his pole aloft, but it fails 
to reach the mark. The persimmon still dangles in tantalizing beauty 
upon the branch. 

"Bravo!" "A good stroke!" "Another leap will fetch it!" "Hurrah 
for Perkins!" were shouted by the excited audience. 

[Perkins retires to await another turn, and M. M. Estee walks with 
faltering step to tbe spot. Just as he reaches the mark he seizes Parks 
by the ear with a firm grip, but the latter, by a dexterous movement, 
frees himself. Cries of "Foul I" "Ear! Ear!" Discomfited by his fail- 
ure Estee swings his pole nervously at tbe fruit, but fails miserably in 
reaching it. He retires amid the groans of the spectators]. 

"Now we'll see some tun," said one stout yeoman, as A. A. Sargent 
marched proudly to the scratch ; " here's the pole that will make that 
persimmon tumble like a beer-joint bum to a soft racket." 

[ Mr. Sargent grasps his pole with an easy and graceful grip, balances 
it aloft for a moment and makes the thrust. The persimmon falls from 
the branch amid the universal applause of the populace. Shannon rushes 
to secure the prize, but lo! and behold! it is nowhere in sight! ] 

" Where is the persimmon ? " asks everybody, in one breath. 

[At this moment Hon. Leland Stanford, who has been a quiet specta- 
tor to all the proceedings, softly inserts his hand in the hat, which he has 
been carrying upside down, and draws forth the much coveted prize.] 

" S'death and s'dam! " said Perkins. 

"Ye gods and anti-monopoly!" shrieked Estee. 

"Well, I'm durned! " smiled Sargent. 

" Three cheers for Senator Stanford! " said the populace, with one ac- 
cord, and hats went into the air as thick as hailstones, while the new 
Senator, with a complacent countenance, bowed his profound acknowl- 



Foot Note. — The longest pole knocks the persimmon, but the biggest 
hat catches it, because it covers tbe biggest head. 

Housekeepers, who take a proper pride in their table, should try the 
Sunrise, Sunshade, Sunset and Sunshine brands of Tea, which are im- 
ported raw by Richards, Harrison & Sherwood, and, after being toasted 
by that firm's new process, put up in convenient-sized packages. These 
Teas are said to be superior to anything in the market. 

BANKS. 

Charles Orocker, E. 0. Wool-worth, Wm. H, Orocker 

CROCKER, W00LW0RTH & CO., 

BANKERS, 
S22 PINE STREET 8AH FBANCISCO. 

(tarry on a General Banking Business. Correspondents 
j in the principal cities of the Eastern States and in Europe. June 16. 

SECURITY SAVINGS BANK. 

GUARANTEE CAPITAL, $300,000. 

Officers: Vice -President, Jerome Lincoln; Secretary, W. 
S. Jones ; Attorney, Sidney V. Smith. Loans made on Real Estate and other 
Approved Securities. Office: No. 216 Sansome street. San FTanciseo. Oct. 1. 

THE GERMAN SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 

Deutsche Spar and Leinbauk, Sio.526 Callfornlastreet.Ban 
Francisco. Officrrs : President, L. GOTTIG. BOARn OF Dirbctors.— L. 
Gotticr, Fred Roeding, Chas. Kohler, Edw. Kruse, George H. Eggers, N. Van Bergen, 
H. L. Simon, Peter Spreckels, A. E. Hecht. Secretary, GEO. LETTE ; Attorneys, 
JARBOE & HAKRISON. May 18. 



Jan. 17, 1 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



GOSSIP FROM NEW YORK. 
New York, January 7, 1883. " Isn't it ■ beautiful right?" was the 

..k iMt night, its, seated Eoe 
box tt i hf MetropnUtao Opera rTwiw, they took in tin- glories of 

rit y Hall of New Y.-rk, where all tbe wealth ;>u>l ln-mity ..f the 
metropoUs are nppoeed bo be gatkavad onoa every year, Joe looked 
sroQDo before unrerhiff, and then said slowly j " Well, BogeDe, 1 never; 

k»w such sights siniv I was sreaned, " Aa I matter of fact, the Charity 
Ball i- ettaoded principally by the old eploatan and dowagers, and the 
older they arf the more i- the display of ariott, necks end bneom*i I have 
seen young men aotually blosh at the node display, while old gallants 
end clob men like Joe Clark, Bogene Dewey and Harry Logan, look on 
and laugh satirically. One of tie morning papers, commenting on the 
" Dotioaablo features" of New York's great charity show, says: "Two 
feature! attraoted universal attention tin*t, the small number uf young 
present, particularly young ladies, and, second, the extreme full 
. m by the Ladiee in low neck costume. Precisely how some of 
the dresses worn last night were retained in place, no ordinary observer 
eonld determine. Looked at from the Boor upward, iu bos after box, the 
appearance presented was that of a collection <>f nudes." I hope, for de- 
oenoy'i sake, thai such nndish costunleB were not numerous at the San 
PVanciaoo Charity BalL But is it not singular that the old dowagers 
ihoiild be si. iiiixi'His t>> display their Hubby and faded charms ? Cuibonof 
Give it op. 

San Pranaeon wai fairly well represented at the Charity Ball. Many 
came f.ir eurinrity to see what the show looked like. Mr. and Mrs. D. 
O. Mills occupied a box vit a vis to one which Mm. George Hearst se- 
aured For herself and Mrs. and Miss Head, who took everything in. Mra. 
J. \Y. Qaahwiler, of San Francisco, occupied a box with her son, Mr. 
Jaied Irwin. Xear by Col. H. ('. Logan entertained a handsome widow, 
lately tome, they say, from the Pacific Coast. Eugene Dewey flitted 
fnitn box to box, paying bis compliments to his lady friends. Mr. James 
EL Keene was seen, from time to time, in different parts of the house. 

Quite a number of Pacific Coast mining experts are here to testify in 
the celebrated Excelsior Gravel mine suit, which will be tried next week. 
Your readers will probably recollect that the Excelsior Gravel mine was 
planted in New York some five or six years ago. Somehow or other when 
Eastern stockholders get " cinched " in a mining operation, they kick like 
steers. They can stand fleecing in a railroad skin like veterans, and 
never squeaj, but to lose an investment in a mining stock operation and 
they are up in arms and fee lawyers with reckless prodigality. The 
Courts are full of suits against trustees and managers of mining compa- 
nies, who are charged with fraud and all sorts of villainy. 

George Roberts has suits enough against him and co-trustees to sink an 
ocean steamship. Many of these are blackmail pure and simple; others 
hive some basis of fact. The Excelsior suit involves about half a mil- 
lion dollars, and is based upon fraud and misrepresentation. Professor 
Thomas Price and Louis Janin are among the latest arrivals in the expert 
line, who are to testify in the case. Joe Clark will give the case the ben- 
efit of bis experience. Among the other experts are Hamilton Smith, 
Jr. , and James D. Hague. Smith has been bidding on acqueduct work 
for, on dit, our old friend, Jim Keene, but, as Jim was not in any of the 
political rings, be didn't get a smell. J. M. Harper, the expert, is trying 
to work off a Montana mine in Philadelphia. 

Gen. O. H. LaGrange has cencluded to resume the practice of the law, 
and is devoting his attention specially to mining litigation and such like. 
The General has become thoroughly acclimated, and likes New York 
more than passing well. 

Jack Mahony's many friends will regret to bear that he is very ill, 
Buffering from rheumatism of the heart, which threatens to carry him 
away. He is at bis mother's house and receives the best of care and 
attention. 

Young Jim Fair is in New York, chaperoned by Col. M. G. Gillette, 
who has taken him under bis special charge, and promised the Senator, 
his father, to make a man of bim or kuow the reason why. Gillette has 
no son of bis own, is a strict disciplinarian, and knows a thing or two. 

The spurt in the wheat market has made business look up somewhat. 
It is wonderful how many operators, who wouldn't touch May wheat in 
I Ibicago at 76^ a couple of weeks ago, have been buying it right along at 
from SO to 87." Always the way. The war rumors from the Continent, 
the discovery of a large shortage in the English markets, the alternate 
freezing and thawing of winter sown wheat out West, are the causes 
that contributed to the upward movement. Of course, your California 
farmers can stand this kind of a raise, and as much more as the specula- 
tors and operators want to indulge in. It is the prevailing opinion that 
wheat is bound to see much higher prices this year, and those who can 
afford to hold will make money. 

Genial old Tom Sunderland came over from Washington a few days 
since to see his many friends. Ex-Governor K. C. McCormick, formerly 
of Arizona, is living here permanently. He was a strong Blaine man, 
and regrets that the three K's should have been so destructive. Curt J. 
Hillyer is engaged in the law business in Washington. On dit, that 
Tommy Edmondson has developed into a regular horse sharp, and as such 
is consulted by all the millionaires who are troubled with the horse-buying 
mania. Bill Hamilton, after whom the Nevada town of White Pine was 
named, has moved to Philadelphia, where he proposes enlightening the 
Quaker mind by means of electricity. Tom Wallace has secured the boss 
telephone and a prospective fortune. OCCASIONAL. 



BANKS. 



E. Amsden, late of San Francisco, now of Yokohama, Japan, exports 
(skillfully packed) all classes of g>ods, from the rarest Curios and Works 
of Art to the more moderate grades, and invites correspondence. No. 18 
Yokohama, under Windsor Hotel. 

For the lunch, dinner or supper table, you can find no more de- 
licious attraction than some of those luscious Mobile Oysters, sold by 
Moraghan, stalls Nos. 68 and 09 California Market. 



Keep Your Husband at Home.— The best way to keep your husband 
at home is to set a good table. The King-Morse Canning Co. bave the 
best articles in the market. 

'A Fact." C. Muller, the Optician, having had 35 years' practice, with 
a thorough knowledge of the eye. Consult none other. 



LONDON, PARIS AND AMERICAN BANK (LIMITED), 

205 Sansome Street- 



Authorized On pltnl 

Nubicrlbed < upiiui 

Paid Up 



.H„.IMIII.OIH) 

. 2,300,000 

. 2,000,000 



DAVID cahn Manager | EOCENB UBTRR Bub-llanager 

Head Office. -9 and 10 T0KENH0U8E YARD, LOTHBURT, LONDON 

Areata. -NEW vukk: Agancj o! the I Ion, Paris and American Bank 

(Limited), Ifl Ex< bsngi Place, P IRIS: Messrs. Lazard Freres&CIo, lORueSto.C* Ho. 

Draw Direct on the Priuclpsl Cities o! tbe United States, Great Britain, Ireland, 
France, Germany, Russia, Austria, Italy, Belgium, Holland, Spain, Swlti 
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at current rates o( exchange. Issue CERTIFICATES OF DEPOSIT and receive De- 
posits on open accounts. BULLION and FOREIGN COINS bought and old. 

BANK OF BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

Incorporated by Royal Charter.— Capital paid up, 81,730,- 
000, with power to Increase to §10,000,000. Reserve Fund, 1250,000. Soothes il 

corner California and SansOHM streets. Head Office— 28 Cornhill, L loo. 

Branches— Portland, Oregon; Victoria and New Westminster, British Columbia. 

n»iB Bank transacts a General Banking Business. Accounts opened subject to Check 
and Special Deposits received. Commercial Credits ifrantcd available in all parts of 
the world. Approved Bills discounted and advances made on good collateral security. 
Draws direct at current rates upon its Head Office and Branches, and upon its Agents 
as follows : 

New York, Chicago and Canada — Bank of Montreal ; Liverpool— North and South 
Wales Bank ; Scotland —British Linen Company ; Ireland — Bank of Ireland ; Mex- 
ico and South America — London Bank of Mexico and South America ; China and 
Japan— Chartered Bank of India, Australia and China ; Australia and New Zealand 
— Bank of Australasia, Commercial Banking Company of Sydney, English, Scottish 
and Australian Chartered Bank. 

THE BANK OF CALIFORNIA, SAN FRANCISCO. 

Capital $3,000,000. 

WM. ALVORD President. 

THOMAS BBOWK, Cashier | B. MURRAY, Jr., A»8*t Cawbler 

Aornts : 

New York, Agency of the Bank of Calfornia ; Boston, Tremont National Bank, 
Chicago, Union National Bank ; St. Louis, Boatman's Saving Bank ; New Zealand, 
the Bank of New Zealand. Correspondent In London, Messrs. N. M. Bothschild & 
Sons. Correspondents in India, China, Japan and Australia, . 

The Bank has Agencies at Virginia City, and Correspondents in all the princi- 
pal Mining Districts and Interior Towns of the Pacifl Coofit. 

Letters of Credit issued, available in all parts of the world. Draw direct on New 
York, Boston, Chicago, St. Louis, New Orleans, Denver, Salt Lake, Cincinnati, 
Port'and, O. , Los Angeles, London, Dublin, Paris, Berlin, Bremen, Hamburg, 
Frankfort-on-the-Main, Antwerp, Amsterdam, Copenhagen, Stockholm, Christiana, 
Locarno, Melbourne, Sydney, Auckland, Hongkong, Shanghai, Yokohama, Genoa, 
ami all cities in Italy and Switzerland. 

THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Paid up Capital $1,500,000, Gold. President, Dnulel Cal- 
lii-lmii. Vice-President, GEORGE A. LOW; Cashier, E. D. MORGAN; 
Assistant Cashier, GEO. W. KLINE. 

Directokb. — D. Callaghan, C. G. Hooker, Peter Donahue, James Phelan, James 
Moffitt, N. Van Bergen, James H. Jennings, George A. Low. 

CORRESPONDENTS— London : Bank of Montreal. No. 9 Birchin Lane, Lom- 
bard street. Dublin : Provincial Bank o( Ireland. Hamburg : Hesse, Neuman 
& Co. Paris: Hottinguer & Co. New York: National Bank of Commerce. Bos- 
ton : Blackstone National Bank. Chicago : First National Bank. This Bank is pre- 
pared to transact a general Banking business. Deposits in Gold, Silver and Currency 
received subject to check or on special deposit. Exchange for sale on the principal 
cities of the United States, Great Britain, Ireland and the Continent. Commercia 
Credits issued available in Europe, Chii.a and Japan. Collections attended to and 
prompt returns made at the lowest market rates of Exchange. June 28, 



THE CALIFORNIA SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY, 

N. W. Corner Eddy and Powell streets, San Francisco. 

Loans made on city and country real estate at current rates. Term and ordinary 
deposits received. Dividends paid in January and July. 
Last dividend, paid in January, 4.50 per cent. 

DIRECTORS— David Farquharson (President), Robert F. Bunker "Vice-President), 
John Bain (Treasurer). John Easton (Surveyor), J. F. Cowdery (Attorney), A. C. 
Corbett, Edward Farrell, Joseph R. Wilcox, Thomas Downing, Charles D, Farquhar- 
son, Chas. Lux. [July 12. J Vernon Campbell, Secretary. 

LONDON AND SAN FRANCISCO BANK, LIMITED. 

Capital, 82,100.000. 

San Francisco Office, 424 California street; London Office, 
22 Old Broad street. Portland Branch, 48 First Street. 
Manager ARTHUR SCRIVENER. 

Assistant Manager, WILLIAM STEEL. London Bankers— Bank of England and 
London Joint Stock Bank; New York, Drexel, Morgan & Co. ; Boston, Third Na- 
tional Bank. This Bank is prepared to transact all kinds of General Banking 
and Exchange Business in London and San Francisco, and between said cities 
and all parts of tbe world. June9. 

THE ANGLO-CALIFORNIAN BANK, LIMITED. 

N.E. Cor. Sansome and Pine Streets, 

London Office, 3 Angel Court ; New York Agents, J. w . Sel- 
igroan & Co., 21 Broad street. Authorized Capital Stock, *u,000,000. Will re- 
ceive Deposits, open Accounts, make Collections, buy and sell Exchange and Bullion, 
loan Monev and issue Letters of Credit available throughout the world. 

FRED. F. LOW, * Mana „ erB 

IGN. STEINUART, \ Mana S ers - 

P. N. Liubnthal, Cashier. Sept. 13. 

THE NEVADA BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO. 

Capital Paid Up $3,000,000. 

Agency at New York, 62 Wall street. 
Agency at Virginia, Nev. 

Buys and sells Exchange and Telegraphic Transfers. Issues Commercial and Trav- 
elers' Credits. Nov - 8 - 



SAN FKANCDSCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Jan. 17, 1885. 



PLEASURE'S WAND. 

* We Obey no "Wand but Pleasure's." —Tom Moore. 

When " Le Cceur et La Main " was first produced in Paris the critics 
declared it to be one of Lecocq's best works. Never had he shown a 
fresher imagination and a more complete mastery of the musical art. 
When first sung in New York, as Heart and Hand, the critics there were 
but faint in their praise. As a paragraphiat expressed it, " Lecocq put 
in, maybe, a good deal of hand, but very little heart." Tbesejtwo.opinions 
are, in their respective extremes, exaggerated. The muBic may be con- 
sidered a compromise between opera comique and operetta. It cannot be 
precisely called a return to Lecocq's earlier style, but it is, nevertheless, 
very much of a reaction. Tne composer of Fleur de The, La Fille de 
Madame Angot and Girajle-Girofia once thought that he was able to write 
music of a more serious class than that which had made his name known 
throughout the world, but, like Offenbach, he was mistaken. In La 
Marjolaine and Le Jour et la Nuit (Manola) he was clearly beyond his 
depth. His desire to compose a high class of music was not a motived one, 
for there was, to what he did compose, a delicious and fascinating com- 
bination of art and frivolity that gave it a sui generis stamp. In melody he 
was, and is, extraordinary fertile ; his tunes are easy and catchy, and ap- 
peal to the many. In the elaboration of his melodies his decided and 
unquestioned musical knowledge is shown in a way that charms the few. 
But, nevertheless, his style is of the essentially light order. It is his 
natural vocation, however hard he may struggle against it, to write mu- 
sic for the people. 

***** 

Heart and Hand is a very fair specimen of this kind of work. It has 
not the go of La Fille de Madame Anqot, but it is bright and lively, with 
a tender thread running through it, musically considered, and it furnishes 
pleasant entertainment. Some of the numbers are exquisite in their com- 
bination of melody and delicacy; others are mere jingles of sufficient 
rhythm to be appreciated by the unmusical ears of the mass. It is in 
the music allotted to Michael a and Gaetan that Lecocq has done his best. 
A higher tone of color is there attained. The first half of the opera is 
the more charming. In the second half the composer seems to have run 
out of material. The plot affords but little material out of which to con- 
struct three acts, and a certain piquancy bad necessarily to be given to 
the action to relieve its tediousness. This has not been closely observed 
in the translation. To put it mildly, the translation is trash. The dia- 
logue is pointless and silly, the humor represented by villainous puns. 
***** 

There are several musical numbers to be noted. The eccentric Soldiers' 
chorus, with its ludicrous effect of dog and cat imitations respectively in- 
troduced in the midst of two phrases; the song sung by the disguised 
Princess, thoroughly French in style, with a species of drone bass and a 
citchy refrain, and Gaetan's song, a song full of emotional expression and 
drama 1 ic earnestness. These are all the first act. In the second act there 
is a strongly-written and skilfully-developed sextette, the celebrated 
"He'met Song," sung by Vannm in Orpheus, and two delicious duets. 
One ot these, the one sung by Josefa and Morales, is constructed on a 
'• double pedal," with a persistently repeated figure for the flute. The 
other, sung by Michaela and Gaetan, is rich and sensuous in its first half, 
but ends with a commonplace castanet song. In the last act there is 
nothing above what may be called "machine-made " music. It may be 
that in the original partition there is pretty music in the final act, but the 
"cuts" of the Abbott Company in this part of the operetta are so ruth- 
less that there is but little of Lecocq left. It is said that this composer 
never scores his own operas, but leaves the job to the respective chefs d' 
orchrstre of the theatres at which they are produced. I do not know who 
to give credit to for the rich instrumentation of the present performance. 
***** 

Principals and chorus give a fair performance of this operetta. The 
male chorus sings with vim and spirit. Allen, as the King, makes a good 
deal out of a very unsatisfactory character. Broderick is heavy in his 
comed v. Miss Annandale, as Josefa, and Castle, as Morales, sing the 
music alloted to them most charmingly. 

***** 

There is not much French chic to Abbott, but she is sprightly and vi- 
vacious as Michaela. In the love duet of the second act, she sings and 
acts with a genuineness of aensuouaness that is remarkable for one ordi- 
narily so practical and matter of- fact an actress. In the la; tact ahe sings a 
French Bone, which is familiar to me, but the name of which I cannot 
recall. It is elaborately adorned with vocal fioriture, and is sung by 
her in her usual style of execution. 

****** 

Tag'iapietra gives to Gaetan a sentimental tone, which, although very 
charming and fascinating, is utterly inconsistent with the humorous and 
burle que spirit of the plot. In a composition of the genuine 
opera-comique school his Gaetan would be a perfect impersonation. The 
characteristics of the Italian school are not apropos io such a work. 
Tagliapietra forgets that operetta is not opera, and sings almost every- 
thing adagio, or at least andante. In operetta, the usual tempo is either 
andantino, allegretto or allegro. The warmth of his manner, while in 
absurd contrast to the trivial comicalities of the King, is not out of place 
in the love duet with M ; chaelo. As sung by Tagliapietra and Abbott, 
there is a depth of passion to this bit of a scene that stirs the blood in 
one's veins. Tagliapietra's costume in the last act must have been se- 
lected in a moment of temporary insanity. It is the most startliog bit of 
incongruous costuming ever seen on the American stage, and Heaven 
knows there is litrie enough chrouological accuracy observed by our stage 
managers in this respect. The song introduced is by Teresa Carreno. 
***** 

A lam's King for a Day (Si j'etais Roi— ) is known to the American pub- 
lic only through the performances of the Abbott Company. It is a light 
work of a calibre to which the abilities of this enterprising singer are well 
suitid. The charm of Tagliapietra's King is as potent as ever, to judge 
by the applause. He endows the character with a decree of true oriental 
languor. In" the second act he interpolates the drinking song from " II 
Guarany." He sings it with great vim, forming a tfc:ong contrast to Vil- 
niant's tan* and modtst effort. 



Faust is sung very much as it was last year. Abbott can hardly be 
called a poetical Marguerite. Fabrioi sings Salve Dimora with a good 
quality of mezzo voce. The better points of Annandale's voice and 
method of singing are developed in Siebel'a Flower Song. Tagliapietra's 
Valentine is a forcible bit of operatic work. As Mepbistopheles, Oam- 
pobello is hardly as effective. In some respects, he is almost tame. But 
still he can be counted among the great Mephistos of the day. 

* 

To the role of Gilda, Abbott has evidently devoted, in the last year, 
some study. In some of the scenes, notably the duet at the end of the 
third act, she almost equals her very meritorious singing in the Traviata 
cavatina, " Ah, fors e lui." The voice is fuller, the method broader and 
both singing and acting are imbued with greater depth of feeling. The 
improvement in Fabrini's voice is more to be noticed in Rigoletto than in 
any other opera in which he appears. ( * La donna e mobile " is sung 
with all the necessary spirit. Annandale as Maddelena, and Broderick 
as Sparfucile, are both excellent. Tagliapietra's Rigoletto is his great 
role. The defects of his voice are the only blemishes. As a dramatic 
characterization, it is almost perfect. The actor and the singer are 
merged into one, and the terrible pathos of the poor jester's misfortune 
is superbly expressed. 

***** 

The more I hear Abbott, the firmer the impression she produces upon 
me. She is of all Americans on the stage, the most thoroughly Ameri- 
can. Her success is an example of purely American " push." Perse- 
verance and shrewdness have made her what Bne is. She has made the 
most out of the scanty gifts nature has bestowed upon her. She is a 
curious singer. Her singing is extraordinarily uncertain. Her voice is 
capricious beyond description. In comparatively easy roles, the thinness 
and weakness of her voice are perceptible outre measure. With strange 
inconsistency, in operas of a more aerious character, she surprises all by 
a sudden gain of vocal volume. Even her fioriture, which at best is but 
poor stuff, gains comparatively, in brilliancy. There is more breath than 
tone to her trill, more jumble than limpidity to her runs, and little else 
but uncertainty of intonation and grimaces to her higher flights in florid 
music, and yet, in Traviata, for instance, there was a successful attain- 
ment of a high ideal. Abbott is not afraid of anything in the op- 
eratic line. There is nothing she will not attempt, little she despairs 
of. Pluck and energy are her substitutes for a musical spirit and an ar- 
tistic instinct. She is truly a curiosity. 

San Francisco is at last to have Iolanthe. We sometimes get ahead, or 
at least keep abreast of the East in theatrical novelties, but generally we 
are unable to make up the handicap of distance, and lag behind. In the 
case of Iolanthe we have been hopelessly beaten. In the East, this 
operetta of Gilbert and Sullivan has outlived its usefulness to managers. 
There its tunes are no longer whistled, its jokes and catch phrases no 
longer current. Not so here ; it is all new to us. We have all read ao 
much about it in the papers and in the letters of our friends from across 
the Rockies; we have all heard so much about it from returned travelers 
that our curiosity is excited. The Abbott company are going to give us 
this treat. On Monday we will be introduced to Iolanthe, Strephon, the 
Fairies and the Lords. 

***** 

Irma, the Waif, gives Idalene Cotton another opportunity of display- 
ing her very versatile talent. This clever young person deserves a better 
training than she is apt to receive in playB of such a class. Ben Cotton is 
unctious as ever. Time has dealt kindly with him. His jollity and his 
activity are as fresh as in the days when we were young. 

***** 

On Monday next the Dalys appear at the Bush-strePt Theatre. Their 
repuation is that of being very amusing comedians, who display their 
diversified abilities in a very amusing sketch, entitled Vacation. They 
represent a party of college boys enjoying themselves on a lark. 

Emerson is trying to make a hit with his very low prices. He gives a 
remarkable entertainment, of very enjoyable features, for a trifle. 
* * * * * 

The Philharmonic Orchestra will give an extra concert on Saturday 
afternoon, February 2d, at 2 p. m. 

***** 

Helen Dingeon is a charming Michaela — pretty in appearance, sprightly 
in acting, and piquant in singing. She makes the Tivoli performance of 
Heart. and Hand a bright and active one. Lortzing's Czar and Zimmer- 
man, under the name of Peter, the Shipwright, is to be the next Tivoli pro- 
duction. The plot of this is taken from an old French vaudeville Le 
Bourgemestre de Saardam. 

Hugo Mansfeldt, whose approval, by the critics of Germany, has given 
him high rank as a pianist, announces a concert for Tuesday evening, 
January 27th. He will be assisted by Miss Alice Dyer, of Oakland, as 
vocalist. 

***** 

It is hardly proper to comment upon a musical composition of religious 
purport in a column devoted, as this is, this week, to the moat frivolous 
sort of amusements, but as the province of this department includes 
everything musical, the undignified juxtaposition of items must be par- 
doned. Mr. E. C. Masten, a young man of thia city, has composed a 
mass (in D) which was sung last Sunday at the Spanish Catholic Church. 
It is a most creditable and promising work, although it does not display 
either the finest musical instinct or the profoundest knowledge of har- 
mony. It shows greater power of combination than invention. Until 
young composers have succeeded in freeing themselves from the direct 
influence of both practical study and admiration for favorite musicians, 
their work will rarely show originality of either melody or harmony. 
It is only when the necessary confidence has been acquired that the 
mind will work for itself. Haydn seems to be the composer whose in- 
fluence Mr. Masten has subjected himself too. In this mass there is 
nothing trivial or frivolous ; Mr. Masteu shows, throughout, a vivid 
sense of the devotional purpose of his composition. The " Gloria" and 
" Benedictus " are particularly rich in religious expression and sacred 
fervor. San Francisco can pride itself on the fact that, notwithstanding 
the lack of artistic encouragement, it is contributing its share to the 
ranks of musical composers. To the names of Edgar S, Kelly and H. 
B. Pasmore, can now be added tLat of E. C. Masten. Beauclerc. 



Jan. 17, 1885." 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



SPORTING. 



Bicycling The Buy Oitj WheslmeD wen- Dot fftvorad with pleas- 
iDl weather for their tournament lant Saturday Digbt; bill in the face nf 
oppoaSna elements they bad ;»ti *udlenaa of nbout I 200, of whom 500 
were ladies. The Treasurer'* 1mI.hh- is, therefore, fortunately "ti the 
right "i.ie, although the margin la maoh smaller than we hoped it woo. Id 
be. The «|H>rt, throughout, wae axeaflent ; the management, on the 
whole, good ; the audience well pleased, and we gladly offer the Club 
.•iir oonxrattiluti'iiis upon the general success secured. The drill was 
quite up to our expectations, and Oaptain Mnhrig must be complimented 
on the fine knowledge of tactics his men displayed, and the smooth, easy 
way in which every change was carried out, without a hitch or break of 
any kind. ^ The slow race. 7-"> yards, waa won by W. H. Gibbons, H. 
Teaney, W. H. Day and \V. M. Meeker dropping out before the finish. 
For the half-mile race, from scratch, E. Bfohtlg, C. J. Sinister, H. Tenney 
and H. W. Melendy started, ofobrig won handsomely in L37$, Tenney 
second. Joseph Dixon won the mile handicap race for boys under 1G. 
He had 75 yards start. Joseph Bley, with ."100 yards, was second. The 
scratch rider, M. Bemlshine, was nowhere. The one-mile maiden race 
was won by II. W. ntetendy in 3:234, II. S. Blood a good second, the 
other competitor being Thos. L. Hill. The one-mile handicap walking 
match followed : J. B, Benjamin, scratch ; C. B. Hill, 35 yards ; J. 
Theobald, -til yards; W. A. Scott, 45 yards ; F. J, Spencer and G. W. 
Hupers, 100 yards. There was a fine struggle between Hill and Renja- 
min. " the long and the short " of the race, Hill winning gamely in 7:24^, 
Benjamin close at his heels. The two-mile rase was really a match be- 
tween S. F. Booth, Jr., and F. E. Johnston. Booth led for the first 
mile, but Johnston won the race brilliantly in 6:52£ The exhibition of 
fancy riding followed, E. Bidout and 0, J. Shu3ter being the performers. 
Both did excellently, and if they had more practice on the smooth floor, 
could do still more surprising feats. They well earned the liberal ap- 
plause given by the audience. The five-mile scratch race was a match 
between E. Mohrig and W. Davis, the only starters. Mob. rig won in 
18:11. The time race, distance one mile, was not very successful. The 
time announced, just before the start, was 4:10. W. Nash won in 4:33. 
The ten-mile handicap race attracted a good deal of attention. Cook, the 
scratch man, was the favorite, because of his well-known staying powers. 
F. E. Johnston was given 15 seconds, H. S. Blood 30, and VV. J. Monro 
45 seconds. Blood gave up before the finish, but Cook, Johnston and 
Monro made a gallant struggle. Johnston rode with axcellent judgment. 
He made the turns much more easily than his competitors, and when 
one-third of a mile from the finish he put on a magnificent spurt, and 
passed both Monro and Cook. He was greeted with thunders of ap- 
plause, and when a moment later he finished first, with 6 lengths to spare, 
the cheering was wildly renewed. Time— 35, 29J. The grasshopper 
race, distance two miles, finished a most enjoyable evening's amusement. 
C. F. Thompson won in 7:bS\. The San Francisco Club has elected the 
following officers for the ensuing year: President, Columbus Waterhouse; 
Captain, Henry A. Greene; First Lieutenant, Henry C. Finkler; Second 
Lieutenant, Charles L. Leonard; Bugler, John Gibson; Club Committee, 
H. C. Eggers and G. W. Kerr; Secretary and Treasurer, George J. Habe. 
At the annual meeting several of the members appeared in the Club's 
new and handsome uniform ; it includes navy-blue coat and pants, black 
stockings and black silk helmet. When the formal business was concluded, 
the members of the Club adjourned to the Bodie restaurant and dined to- 
gether. The spread was the finest the members have ever taken 
together; the viands were deliciously cooked, and the wines were of the 
finest quality. The President, as usual, filled the chair, and waa in his 
happiest and most genial mood, the whole entertainment passing off with 
delightful harmony. Naturally the members of the San Francisco Club 
feel very much aggrieved at the hasty action of the Park Commisioners 
in excluding all bicycle-riders from the Park. The Club waa the first 
organization to secure for local wheelmen the privilege of riding over the 
Park roads. Very strict rules were drawn up in regard to members rid- 
ing in the Park, and these have been followed to the letter. Not a single 
accident has ever happened through the carelessness of any member of 
the San Francisco Club. Now, after several years, two irresponsible and 
recklehS boys cause two mishaps in one day, for which the members of an 
old and conservative club, who have for years studied the welfare and 
safety of visitors to the Park, must suffer in being deprived of the use of 
the only roads in this city that are fit to ride a bieycle over. We trust 
the Park Commissioners will reconsider the matter, and, under proper re- 
strictions, allow a number of gentlemen to indulge in this delightful exer- 
cise in the only place suitable. The danger is not from the bicycle, but 
from wrong-headedness of the riders. 

Rowing.— The Triton Boat Club is reported to be almost split in two 
by internal dissentious. The case and cause seems to stand thus: About 
two years ago, some six or seven unruly members of the Dolphin Club 
were expelled. They proclaimed themselves far and wide as " injured 
innocents," and under false pretenses attracted a good deal of sympathy, 
and at once formed the Triton Club; a large number of young men 
joined them, and the new club was soon able to erect and equip the hand 
some boatbouse they now occupy at the foot of Montgomery Avenue 
Recently, the men wno were expelled from the Dolphin club have formed 
a clique in the Triton ranks, and they are now actively engaged in trying 
to drive out the orderly and well disposed members, by subjecting them 
to many annoyances. The quarrelsome seven have adopted a rule or ruin 
policy, so far as the club is concerned, but we understand that in both at- 
tempts they will fail, the majority of the club deciding to give the dis- 
turbers the choice of two things, either to resign or be expelled, as they 
were from the Dolphin Club. 

Duck-shooting. — The most recent and reliable reports we have are as 
follows : On the Sacramento river and the flooded lands on either side, 
ducks and geese are very scarce; the market hunters can barely make a 
hiving. The mallards have long since gone to other feeding grounds ; 
widgeon, teal, with a sprinkling of spoonbills and sprig, are all that is 
left. Many of the hunters' arks are lying unused beside the railroad 
track. The direct cause of the migration of the wild fowl is said to be 
the large number of flooded grain fields near Colusa. The report from 
that quarter being that the fields are literally black with ducks and geese. 



Flahlng.— On Thursday, Friday and Saturday of last week, Mr II. 0, 
Ladd, while fishing in tide water on Paper .Mill Creek, near Olema, 
booked two salmon, whioJi he estimated to weigh SO end 

sportively, but both got away. Messrs M 

sportsmen, were fishing last week in Paper .Mill Creek, near the White 
Bouse, where Lhey put oat sixty set Lines ; Fortunately tin ■ 

ih, but did not succeed in landing either ol them. < Inei li y < ireen, 

the notorious fisherman, has been r intly fishing In Piper Mill Creek, 

above the dam, where he caught four salmon trout. Such fa bis own re- 
port of bis own perfurmanoe, which we oommend to the notice of the 
Fish_ Commissioners. The dam on theoreek near the Paper Mills is being 
repaired. During the short time that it was open a large numl 
Halmon passed up the stream and have been seen at San Geranfmo and 
Lagunitas. Young salraou have been taken freely front the bay re 
Green street. Spear street and the cattle wharves have been the most 
favored localities, and some success has also been met at the oil and 
refinery wharves. At Tiburon and along thetr stle bridge in Etichai 
Bay, large catcher of flounder have been taken during the week. White 
perch have appeared at O ikland Wharf, within a week, but the best sport 
for this kind of fish can be had off the rocks at Fort Point. 

Athletics.— We suppose this heading is as good as another for tin- dis- 
play to take place at the Central Park to morrow. It is to be a Cow 
Boy's carnival, judged by the notices that have been printed. Doubtless 
the fun will be fast and somewhat furious, and we hope for the sake of 
the spectators, there may be no dispute as to a division of the gate 
money. Otherwise the actors may use their six-shooters in a manner 
more exciting than safe. Kittleman is once more in the city, anxious to 
rim any man in the world 100 yards for $500 or 81, 000. This is a poor 
place to look for runners; we never had a ten-second man amongst us, 
and there is no prospect that we ever shall have one. Californian's don't 
take kindly to the cinder path. Lewis, the Oregon man, appears to be 
the game Kittleman is after. Doubtless the event will be fixed up in a 
few days, and we shall then know all about it. 

The Ring.— Brady and Whistler are to fight for the gate money, some- 
where, and within thirty days. There are now something less than one 
hundred fights, for purses, belts and other unconsidered trifles. We can- 
not keep the list in mind, it is so long, but the Brady and Whistler knock- 
out, Queensbury Rules, overtops the rest. They, the sloggers, are sure to 
get a crowd, but what sort of a match the crowd will see, the event will 
prove. _ It is none of our business. We are asked every day, " will it be 
a genuine fight?" and our answer has been, "go and see for yourself." 
We have no faith in any of the brood. 

Rifle Shooting. — At Shell Mound, last Sunday, there was some good 
shooting done at the 200-yard range, as the following scores will show, 
the strings being 20 shots each: Hovey, 47 and 44—91; Ranlett, 42 and 46 
—88; Moore, 43 and 43- 8G; Vaughn, 42 and 40—82; Townsend, 4<> and 
39—79. At the same distance, 10 shots each, Kellogg and Waltham 
made 46 and 43 respectively. At the 500-yard range, 20 shots each, Hovey 
made 93, Johnson, 88, and Ranlett, 79. 

BUSH-STREET THEATRE. 

Mr. M. B. LEAV1TT. Leasee and Manager | Mr. JAY RIAL Acting Manager 

Continued Success of the Old-Tinic Favorite, 

BEN COTTON I 

Supported by his Talented Daughter, IDALENE COTTON, in the Beautiful 

Comedy-Drama entitled, 

IRM&, THE "WAIF! 

Incidental to the plav BEN and IDALENE COTTON will introduce SONGS. 

DANCES, BANJO SOLOS and IMITATIONS. Last Matinee Saturday. 

Monday, Jan. 19— A Feast of Fun! THE DALYS and their Great Combination, 
in T. A. Daly's and Fred Marsden's Athletic Comedy, Vacation; or, Harvard vs. Yale. 

CALIFORNIA THEATRE. 

WM, EM3RSON Lessee and Mumper 

TREMENDOUS HIT OF 

EMERSON'S NEW COMPANY! 

DON'T FAIL TO SEE MUI/DOONS PICNIC! 

— NOTICE! — 
All the School Children are invited to attend the Picnic on Saturday. It will only 
cost Twenty-five Cents for a Reserved Seat -nothing extra. 
NIOHT PRICES -Gallery, 15c; Family Circle, 2,ic ; Dress Circle and Orchestra, 50c. 

TIV0LI OPERA HOUSE. 

Eddy street, near Market.— Krellugr Bros., Sole Proprietors 
and Managers.— This Evening, and until further notice, Lecocq's Charming 
Comic Opera, 

Heart and Hand! 

Produced in a Superb Manner, with the following Cast: Micaela, Helene Dingeon) 
Jo^efa, Kate Marchi; DonaSco] istica, Emily Possezi; Anita, Lottie Walton; Don Ga- 
etan, T. W. Eckert; The King. E. N. Knight; Don Mosquitos, R. D. Valerga; Briga- 
dier Baldomero, M. Cornell Morales, H. Nieman. 

The original music only will he sung. 

Admission, 25 cents, Reserved Seats, 50 cents. Jan. 17. 

BALDWIN THEATRE. 

EMMA. ABBOTT OPERA COMPANY! 

FOURTH AND LAST WEEK I 



Thursday... Iolanthe 

Friday ( 4th Act Trovatoro 
I 1st Act Traviata 
3d Act Mfcnon 



Saturday 

EMMA ABBOTT 
Matinee. 



Monday, Jan. 19. .Iolanthe 

Tuesday Sennramide 

Wednesday Matinee 

II Trovatore 

Wed. Night.KingforaDay j 3d Act Rfgoletto j Saturday Night ...Martha 

Jan. 2U.-SHADOWS OF A GREAT CITY. [Jan. 17. 

THE GRAND PACIFIC RINK, 

Cor. Sitfter and Jones Sts. 

There will be a GRAND ORANGE RACE TO-NIGHT. It promises to be a very 
amuaing affair. Jan. 17. 



s\N FRANOISOO NEWS LETTER. 



J«n, 17, 1886, 



WORLD, FLESH AND DEVIL 



t By M Truthful Foil man 1 



An artilleryman tn the UIaiuI of Kiioul. m 

Marnrl lim o! .» singular noddenl. Being Fond 

,-t tWhiuii iu hi* leisure moments, ha laio* down somt night linn M usual. 

wlnii to the soot the next morniug ho found th.it oat ol them At 

nl ,» hit*, I>rnwtng op hi* Uns with nuvsideroblt effort*, ho saw 

with pleasure thet hi* capture Rut ssj| ol iht w 

[OU o| the Rsh, h mil as 

inture n( ih.' i»etfa with which it h armed, he in 

light hand And to 

ill, to, I .» Fearful Lit." H* BWOOned FroU) the pun Mid lOM of blood. 

and the boot, drill In shore At the iVi.lo Inter -n, ho wm taken out, still 

iml .ilten.1,-,1 to At III* l\lslOUI House there. Alter hni lofl 

hi* baud ten to tlu- military hoapitafc 

' tin* tun, the NttmrKtt At'. ». WM mneh esteeme.l 
aUOteHl*, who ■ ouslruete.l for the 

The htalurj ol Vnutius (Vlllo, who canted hit tronsgri 
to be Ruug uu.- those poud* .ts food for the wHrtrniv, is well known, 

The following story al Su H. B I ioch, lio> ernor ol \ loeurta, is going 

ind ol tlu- \n>u.»:<: > klleooy visiting Iht 

oital lately, h* fonml unlv on* patient " An yon thi 

inmate * naked tin- Governor " No, sir, thi plae. was 

Hien where or* the otoem ' was the natural Inquiry, 

but most is pi 
: match Li « For mo," he. o-ontume.l. Phou, 

np, added : '* Hut I'm guilt)! to th* play to night, I am, I'm 
.or." 

It fa stated that | gentleman whotttnort likely to know wl 
■■-.-; and the Soudan limn most ol our guides, ; 

*\s th.it tho 
Htahdi .:ini soldiers utd omcere, utd thai 

it he were to wish it ha couldnoi ■-. had tho garrison to with 

ted with the N htinnnl u*Hj 
\ .. 
in the Soudnn. Prw ^ ol taldai tins stAtomout 

The Maori Klu£. on hfa ivtoro to hi S Mlnnd, 

hna eiven Ins impv, :a , i»o hm 

til to And cti.^t In* .vliniiAti.Mi is in Bttoh ( 

ird with thnt id the « toot, Ho thinks the 

- .- exhiMtion in Rngfond is theahoveJiag un o| gold it: tho 

Ivnitk ol Khi;1ah,1, I „ qo DOMOM > huHilnsltoM more. th.-*n 

ith the grnndneKi ol tho minnw of hnnting 
hlth.v Ittore whieh ■ s J*.mrt**h 

It t» u soiiuMvtiat routtu-hahle fact th.it tho oho i .n.l h 

owrtain ■ . \ . , ■ \ .■■ . This 

eoatpetitiott ■ itntlo AtnaU' 
:. l'ho other .i.iy nbnut 1*000 : 

l iwdon, uo Mate \m lite 

• leuttere\l -it SV W a ton. hut e nttne 
£0 50 .-» ton, utd the 

Omn WSMt hw nropottadod .i mn nueatiau, u,- - q i w hj ahouM 

. be tAshiov ... ol dwh 

w t uighl odd W | 

A why el mid he nol tho 

learned, ha* perhapt never heard ol tho 

no aeooQntinj! for tat 

■i ,'o«r«;ij\ 

Hotaoihnrs owatN « is Miafed the t War and th* navel ol 

x ■ »(f, whteh will 

I railroad ti.iitiol hoe bean ran no- 

ie roivAtovl Ua»ta Iv^^u tho work al uneettting tho 

mk) tho heavy trains are ewryinj; on tho ,L Sevnral 

p a t o hw v't wall hnveainady t"*Hon, and I ired indangar. 

The- uutiil>. bed S .it I he 

Manared with : ; t - 1 *t the 
^ m; ,\', tho outumenceutent 

'■.\01UV 

or, l>7°. and 

rt\o mb nfl \ :'.»Tsytiwu in ' ' 

UMUrrnHl in tho ohaUal 

■■ ... . . 

SIM . | . ,. 

suUsUutial dxvk* ol the «' 

"■■ lth<T», 

A srand ntonetaxy boaflre will s KV i» Komo. Tho 

ina<vordan«e with tho l»e 
i*y of ^vi^vr mono? will be {urtnaUv bnrned in* 

aul croet'.Ki, . •. Many three mil 

>..■: s >:. ' :. ,. u ;.. > ,;■:>- ■.»•.. smoke 

Bere t> nonietttinjt foi aoiuv nnaaU recover] Fran 

... .... 

limb in pJ*.stor of l*ari*. 
r« to lrvl«i»i tx^ |vue the 
MM " own js. 



THE GAME-BIRDS OF CALIFORNIA —No 1. 
| A» tlt9 followtni; subject is ol patatnounl intorost to a number ol the 
\ n. ] re Intend enoh week to pablkb n deeoripUon ol 

tme bird, riving Ita habits, the beet manner ol bagvingit and how 
to prepare it (or the table. At the Mint time we shall endeavor to point 
onl hunting (fronnde within r Few hours' \ turney from San Frai 
where t;»ir ipoH can be had, and give other paHianlare, wtnoh onnnot Fall 
to be ol Intereel to thoM •■ re of the Run. We niny, .-*t the 

Mme time, tdd th.it tho News l inn; offlot heitunted on raerehnnl 
■treet, near Montgomery, end thai any over laden kportsmao is pei 
.•*t hhorty to leave pari of hi* burden ol gout *t this offlot 1 
Tur < V H ah There are Fen gamer birds than the Calitarnian quail, or, 

■ .-:,>. and h Rpnrtauinn who 
is not :i ntnoitg thom is Indeed IismI to 

pleaM- The oommon Californlnn quail I th bnoh 

and wins* ol an oHvAOeone brown, the utd terUariea 

with buff ; breatl and ntoh Ah.no. plumbtotu : the tmbrtoated (eathett 
on tho latter wltfc d middle itript ol blaok ; top of head, 

brown, nnd creel or top knot, blnoklth brown ; throat, black edged with 
while, i.'u.tii begin to nest in fcprll nnd Mtny, the uumbw 
Ing From ndo m or twenty, rinse, like ohiokent, begin to 

ior .» living m soon m tlnv art out of tho shell. Quail thootiog 
oommenoM on October 1st nnd ena» on Februery Slst. During tht 

; the Beaton taanj bevies ;iu- met with thai .irr' hardly iolt t- 1 fty. 

rtuoan will ol wnrtt not molest. Quail luoraatt rapid 

In many inttMncet they hatch onl two broodi In t ttaton. V^ hunt 

quail siuvossfullv.it is abeoltttelj . For II 

Wert is one Atom of life lott in a hit bird it will hide itself in ;» hole, or 

under (treat or brush in tuch t manner at to defy tht n 

hunter. Setters or pointers trained t.» retrieve are tl 

on quail. Spaniel*, ' and dumbert, have been tried, but bavt 

been Found too anstoady For Utt sport, Howovor, In thiok onemiet ut 

ohapertJ thoy *tv useful, a-s being smaller they o.in Rush nod i 

n hen- a larger clog erould be nnaJut to move About with any free 
don, In qaoi] shooting a light gnn shonM be used, ol s tti 
smaller barn, Hm reason For this is Ihnl the oountry whore quail Are 

numerous is goners liuj;, end often mountainous, so 

th.it t: ', % man carries tho bettor. Besides, s mu has to be 

quick al * Rath when shooting quail uaong trees, nnd a light gnn is tl 

w.i\s h.m.lior In tho eirl\ part of the - \ dtO Argt 

\ 3 I bt Found mort of 
Feclivo, The main secret in successful quail hunting is to pen 
When t> bevy ol ^\- nsstht hunter should oever leave thom 

until hi h.is shot mail ol them, or they have got Into somt iu.u. 
cafton. Tho reason For this is that nftwr .i Few shots hnvt 1h\»ii tiixHl. and 
tho birds carefully Followed up, they soattor, btcomt dttnornHied, and 
will !i, ig, Tlioiv i> thou no better sport to be had in Catttor 

niA. for if pnperiyhnndted the) wilt rest, one or two At a time. It is 
best, under those drcumstai attempt to retrieve « bird until 

all, or nearly nil, ol the birds havs \ 

,vll the killed nnd wounded without Rushing the others. The ohJeJ drm 
bach toqnsil their tendency t^ > tree. This is mod annoying 

In the hunter, for when the Foliage is tuck it is Almost imp 
thom. Of to get a shot when they fly out, *$ I 'it the 

■site si.lo to that which the hunter i? on. Tho blue jay is at the same 
tune tho friemi and oueniv of the qvisjl M*> Feeds Upon Its Sgjgt, but in 
return ho WOTM it of the hunters tpuroaoh with ill ShriU I 

uMtl to kill one of I In cooking quail, 

the best metr. across their 

and bake ten minutes in n 

iliro enemy of the quell, ana it is w^rtc! that thousands Art* ni 

V,,ni in the N :e growing dlsi 

that the quail dS ntn^ quail is nuLiw 

fnl. tad every hunter thould make a point ol '.imp ho 

QOttMl M 

The «oM*t(«»*t ftmsi is a larger bird than the common one, and Is 
..une uniMes, in tho mount 

l neck, s rich rcl brown, with 
lee and tortiarh h black, It i> a bird the 

not allhrd much sport to the shooter, as I of fly 

it almost imi > d, qsftong the 

thiok m.mjAnitA bushes, where It 1m mountain 

qotil nbounds in tho nortiht n Ne> ..*. There the tndjans 

trap thom in tnrgt numbere, mid At tht 

is tliiok on tho jjivuml, th, - 
V ir>:iinA City 

INSURANCE. 

FIREMAN'S FUND INSURANCE COMPANY. 



fivo .ud McLi-ino lusurAuoo. 



s 






A Bel* I 






One fAousjtad live l-.uiiar s -a And fwly-.\uo —^ 

- 
titu«s. 






s 



- 



Mil V If IIMII'If. 
! aOTJTHWKSr COR. CALIFORNIA AND SANSOKG BCB 
v » \ FttROISI 

PACIFIC DEPARTMENT 

LONDON AND LANCASHIRE FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY 

W Ul CHI'lllll.. 

i Okpttai ts.aeo.ooo 

OuhAutl) 

CwhAucUui I'miolSam l.S*S,5*8 

BI1HIU1.I.I IIIKII ,1 lU..l.fi,fMll.™i,. 
\luvkt*. 3t* l\ttifitrmt4t Street, SMI Fr«»ria<«. 



Jan. 17, I 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



THE LOCAL DARWINIAN. 

There once wan a thinker nbfltrune 
Man'* origin NHXghl to ilrtluce. 

He tried vivUn-tion, 

And natural selection, 
But of neither coold in ike any use. 
While at iVoodicard'a the search to pursue, 
An anthropoid ape met his view : 

"Good (,;«*! !" cried the sage, 

Afl he peered in the cage, 
" I'vo struck an idea that's new! 
If my knowledge I manly expend, 
And come to a premature end, 

What matters the loss of a 

Modern philosopher 
Science's law to defeud? 
"As the ape still resists elevation 
To man's present paramount station, 

I guess I'll arrange 

As perfect a change 
By process of degeneration ! " 
Then he gave up articulate speech. 
And practiced each day on the beach ; 

Round and round in the snn 

On all fours he would run, 
And jabber, and whistle, and Bcreech. 
He studied each simian he met, 
Their manners and customs to get : 

Chimpanzee and Chinchilla, 

Ourang and Gorilla, 
Spider monkey and small Marmozet. 
His garments were next all discarded, 
And naked around the back yard did 

Our scientist go 

His wool for to grow, 
For clothing the object retarded. 
In a tree, to pursue his design, 
Every day would he breakfast and dine ; 

But he noticed with trrief 

That, prehensile or brief, 
No tail graced the end of his spine. 
To encourage his tail and his fleece 
His entire epidermis with grease 

He annointed ; but while 

Success seemed to smile, 
Some neighbor informed the police. 
The Professor escaped just in time, 
(It was lucky he knew how to climb,) 

Most deeply disgusted 

His project was busted. 
And science considered a crime. 
But Fortune befriended the sage, 
For a showman — the 6rst of the age — 

Lured him into his gallery, 

Paid him a salary, 
And shut him up snug in a cage. 
Though you laugh at his story and quiz it ; 
The Philosopher's well worth a visit j 

Clad in strips of hair-trunk 

And more or less drunk 
He shines as a great "What is it?" 
San Francisco, January 10, 1885. 

THE NEW CORONER. 

The News Letter has been for a long time past a consistent and fear- 
less critic of the present Coroner, C. C. O'Donnell, and an active oppo- 
nent of almost every idea of which he has been in favor. This has arisen 
out of the fact that he has always been a champion of demagogy, and 
that a thorough knowledge of his antecedents necessarily threw doubt 
upon any promise he might make for the future. "We opposed his candi- 
dacy at the last election, and at many previous ones, and looked upon the 
men who voted for him as little less than criminals or imbeciles. The 
opinions of a paper are but the opinions of men. We do not claim for 
the News Letter's opinions infallibility, although we do claim, as a rule, 
to get close up to the truth. In this O'Donnell matter, the man has been 
elected and is now discharging the duties of the office. So far he has 
conducted himself with dignity, and is discharging the duties devolving 
upon him in a manner which cannot be found fault with. In this he has 
surprised the News Letter, as well as many other close observers. 
We hasten, therefore, to say so, not merely because we believe in giv- 
ing the devil his due, but also in the hope that a prompt recognition of 
his conduct may lead to its continuance. We must not be understood 
by this as indorsing O'Ponnell's past, or guaranteeing his future. We 
are dealing with the present, and we have no hesitation in saying that 
if this man continues as he has begun he will deserve public esteem. 
Good came out of Nazareth once, and it may again. The new Coroner, 
however, must not backslide. His beginning is the standard by which 
he must be measured. It will not do to run in jobs, or trickery, or dema- 
gogy further on in his official career. 

In conclusion, the News Letter desires to say, in this connection, that 
th6 action of the Mayor and Board of Supervisors, in offering factious 
opposition to O'Donnell's praiseworthy efforts towards establishing a 
proper public Morgue is discreditable, and should be immediately 
terminated. ____ 

The Metropolitan Hall, Fifth street, near Market, is a splendidly- 
equipped place for holding public meetings, concerts, etc. It contains 
an organ which, in point of size, tone, etc., is the most magnificent on 
the Pacific Coast. This is a very pronounced advantage. 



INSURANCE. 



HUTCHINSON & MANN 
Fire and Murine* Insnranoe A.fgenoy t 

Nos. 322 and 324 California Stieet. San Francisco. Oil. 

Capital Represented $27,000,000. 

All Losses Equitably Adjusted and Promptly Paid* 

PACIFIC DEPARTMENT 
THE FIRE INSURANCE ASSOCIATION OF LONDON. 

HUTCHINSON & MANN .Managers | W. L. CHALMERS.Spoclal and A.lju.tir 

HOME MUTUAL INSURANCE COMPANY, OF CALIFORNIA. 

Organised 1S64. 
Principal Offloe 216 Samsome street. 

FIRE INSURANCE. 

Capital Paid Up in TJ. S. Qold Coin) $300,000 00 

Reinsurance Reserve $200,069 75 

Assets January 1, 1884 $759,475. 13 I Premiums, since orgnnisHit'n. 84,511, s27 .57 

Surplus for policyholders 8758,096.78 Losses, Bince organization.. 81,972,098. 40 

Net Surplus (over everything. 8252.03U.9S j 

OFFICERS * 

J. P. HOUGHTON President I OUAs! R. STORY Secretary 

3. L. N. SHEPARD Vice-President | R. H. HAOILL General Agent 

Directors of tub Homr Mutual Insurakck Co.— L. L. baker, H. L. Dodge, J. 
L. N. Shepard, JohnCurrey.J. F. Houghton, John Sinclair, C. Watcrhouse, Cnaoooej* 
Taylor, S. Hug, J. S. Ca rter , H. P. Coo n. April 12. 

SOUTH BRITISH AND NATIONAL FIRE AND MARINE INS. CO. 

Capital, $20,000,000- 
Unlimited Liability of Shareholders. 

THE CITY OF LONDON FIRE INSURANCE CO. 

Capital. $10,000,000- 

THE STANDARD MARINE INSURANCE CO., LIMITED, 

Of Liverpool. Capital, $5,000,000- 

W J. CALLINOHAB A CO., General Agents, 

213-215 Sansoiue Street 
R. H. NAIINTON. Manager City Department. 

UNION INSURANCE COMPANY OF SAN FRANCISCO. 

PRINCIPAL OFFICE 416 CALIFORNIA STREET. 

(CALIFORNIA LLOYDS.) 

Capital 8750,000 | Assets Over 81,000,000 

The Leading Fire and Marine Insurance Co. of California. 

JAS. D. BAILEY Secretary I GUSTAVB TOUCHARD President 

C. P. FARNF1ELD General Agent | N. G. KITTLE Vice-President 

GEO. T. BOHEN, Surveyor. 

A JOINT POLICY ISSUED BY THE FOUR COMPANIES. 

Imperial Fire Insurance Co , of London Instituted 1803. 

London Assurance Corporation, of London. 

Established by Boyal Charter 1720. 

Northern Assurance Corporation, of London.... Established 1836. 
Queen Insurance Company, of Liverpool Established 1857. 

ROBERT DICKSON, Manager. 
S.E. Cor. California and Montgomery Sts., Safe Deposit Building. 

PHSNIX ASSURANCE COMPANY 

Of London, England, Estab'd 1782.-Cash Assets, $5,266,372.35 

BRITISH AMERICA ASSURANCE COMPANY 

Of Toronto, Canada, Estab'd 1833.~Cash Assets. $1,343,908.54 

WESTERN ASSURANCE COMPANY 

Of Toronto, Canada, Estab'd 1851.— Cash Assets, $1,357,328.39 
BUTLER A HALDAN, 

General Agents for PaciOc Coast, 

405 California Street San Francisco. 

THE SWISS MARINE INS. COMPANIES COMBINED. 

Switzerland, of Zurich, Capital 5,000,000 francs; Helvetia, 
of St. Gall, Capital 10,000,000 francs ; Baloise, of Basle, Capital 5,000,000 francs. 
These three Companies are liable jointly and severally for all losses that may be sus- 
ained. Losses made payable in all the principal seaports of the world. In the set- 
tlement of all claims under an English policy, these Companies will strictly adhere to 
the conditions and customs adopted at Lloyds, and submit to English jurisdiction, 
jono 9. HARRY W. SYZ, Agent, 420 and -122 California St., S. F. 

THAMES AND MERSEY MARINE INSURANCE COMPANY 

(Limited), of Liverpool, London and Manchester. 

OAPITAX SUBSCRIBJD1>....~ $1 °A\l?.^ 

Oaoital paid tip • • 1,000,000 

Reserve fund ( in, 'addition to capital) I'il^.'I'i'K 

Total Assets June 30, 1S83 S,222,71Si 



WM, 



GREEK HARRISON, Manager, 

308 Pine street, San Franci sco. 



[July 19.] _ 

NATIONAL ASSURANCE COMPANY OF IRELAND. 

[ESTABLISHED A. D. 1B22.] 

Authorized Capital.$10,000,000 I Subscribed Capital... $5,000,000 

H. M. NEWHALL & CO., 

General Agents for the Pacific Coast. 

fjoace — 309 Sausome street, San Francisco. 

BRITISH AND FOREIGN MARINE INS. CO. OF LIVERPOOL. 

(Capital 85,000,000.— Agents: Balfour, Guthrie * Co.,Ko. 
7 316 California street, San Francisco. nov. is. 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 17, 1885. 



THE SHARON CASE. 

The latest development of villainy in the Sharon case has fairly 
taken away the breath of the community. That, for any purpose what- 
ever, a member of the Bar should deliberately write, in his own hand, a 
pretended contract between himself and a witness, on whose evidence 
mainly a cause had already been decided in favor of his client, and then, 
with or without the consent of that witness, and after careful and re- 
peated study and experiment forge his signature, and then deliver the 
document to his clerk with instructions to sell the infamous manufacture 
to his adversary for any sum he could obtain between S10,000 and $50,- 
000, would be impossible of belief, had not the shameless perpetrator of 
the crime boldly avowed on the witness stand his act, and demonstrated 
his iniquity. 

Judge Tyler seems to imagine that he has played only a sharp profes- 
sional trick upon his adversary, justified by the willingness of his oppo- 
nents to treat with his clerk, who, under his own instructions, had gone 
out from him as a pretended deserter. Had this false contract been gen- 
nine it would, or should, at least, have settled the cause. Its production 
in court would have conclusively demonstrated a guilty and criminal com- 
bination between the lawyers and the witness, as well as a gross imposi- 
tion successfully practiced upon the Court. The defendant in such a case 
was justified in obtaining such conclusive and damning evidence at any 
price. Indeed it was a public as well as private obligation to secure it, 
especially if he knew that he had been defeated by every species of fraud, 
conspiracy, forgery, perjury and subornation of perjury. No man in his 
senses would hesitate ts do just what the counsel for the defendant in this 
case did. It is true he was successfully deceived. It is true he was 
cheated and robbed of a large sum of money. It is true that the conspir- 
ators have now the coin, and propose to hold on to it, but it cannot be 
true that the bar will sanction such villainy. It cannot be true that any 
right-minded citizen can uphold it. 

The laugh that ensued at General Barnes' expense has died out, and in 
its place has come a sentiment quite opposite to that of mirth. It re- 
mains to be seen what power the law possesses in Buch a case. It cannot 
be true that the officers of public justice will hesitate to exhaust the re- 
sources of the Criminal Code to punish every person connected with an 
outrage bo bold and conscienceless. Whether the alleged bo?us contract 
be genuine or counterfeit, we express no opinion. It is as likely to be 
one as the other; but in either event, if Mr. Gumpel signed it, knowing 
the purpose for which it was designed, or trained Judge Tyler to imitate 
his signature, he has shown a willingness to serve him in this fraud, 
which may well argue the possibility of previous corrupt arrangements 
and understanding respecting his testimony. The whole business is ab- 
solutely sickening. 

From first to last, this case has been a stench in the nostrils of the 
community. Its moral sewer-gas has nauseated every household. It has 
disgraced the State abroad, and the press everywhere, without exception, 
has apparently been lost in wonderment that such a suit could live so 
long and end as it has. It is now a common nuisance. It calls for stern 
suppression by every appliance known to the law. If the principals and 
accessories in this last criminal indecency are permitted by the Court to 
divide between them one dollar of Mr. Sharon's money, by the aid of the 
beneficent provisions of the law requiring a recreant husband to provide 
for a pure, good, but deserted wife, we shall be again greatly snrprised, 
if, indeed, our capacity for surprise is not already exhausted, The com- 
munity will be roused to the expression of an indignation hitherto unex- 
pressed, out of respect to the judicial system, but which has been daily 
growing stronger. 

Courts can command small respect when such offences can go un- 
whipped or find palliation or excuse. The plaintiff may be entitled to 
alimony, and Judge Tyler may be entitled to attorney fees by a lax and 
favorable construction of the law, but if Judge Sullivan condemns Mr. 
Sharon to pay a dollar, at least until the fruits of Judge Tyler's fraud 
are brought into Court, and returned to the defendant, he will do what, 
from all our previous knowledge of his reputation, will be a most unex- 
pected act. 

LET US HAVE JUSTICE AND NOT LAW. 

The Bar Association of San Francisco has appointed a committee 
to inquire into the present crowded condition of the Supreme Court Cal- 
endar, and to suggest some means of removing the barrier which at present 
stands between the public and speedy justice. At present that depart- 
ment of the Court which embraces San Francisco in its jurisdiction is 
two -and -a- half years behind in its work, ana the two other departments 
are far from being up with the cases on file. In other words the Supreme 
Court, under the present condition of things, practically bars the road 
to justice. This is a state of affairs which certainly demands immediate 
and serious consideration, and the Bar Association has done well in un- 
dertaking to investigate it. The News Letter is ambitious of helping 
in this good work, and begs to offer the committee a few suggestions as to 
the cause, or causes, which have operated so as to clog the wheels of the 
judical stystem. The fact of the matter is, the Supreme Court admin- 
isters too much law and too little justice. In cases of atrocrious crime 
i ; has frequently interposed its power upon the slimmest of strained tech- 
nicalities, in order to protect criminals and defeat justice. The Court's 
action in some of these cases, in fact, has been perfectly scandalous, just 
convictions being set aside upon the most frivolous pretense, where the 
convicted person had had the advantage of even more than every sub- 
stantial right to which he was entitled, and where even a shadow of a 
doubt as to guilt did not exist. In civil suits, too, the shadow, rather 
than the substance, of justice is pursued, and proper decisions are re- 
versed upon the thinnest technicalities. The consequence is a deluge of 
appeals beyond the capacity of the Court to get through; and of these a 
third or more are entirely destitute of merit. If the Superior Court 
would refuse to interfere with the decisions of the lower courts, except 
in order to further substantial justice, and would disbar every lawyer 
who makes a causeless appeal, the present difficulty would soon be over- 
come. This is the remedy which common sense suggests, but it is hardly 
the remedy which lawyers' sense will suggest. 

It Is said that a telephone transmitter has been placed in the pulpit 
of Dr. Talmage, in New York. Wires are thus run to the houses of 
members desirous of hearing the sermons without going to the church. 
The idea is well worthy of adoption in less civilized parts of the world. 



THAT RECOUNT. 
The recount in the Shrievalty contest, which was concluded before 
Judge Wilson this week, should be pondered over in detail by all intelli- 
gent and patriotic citizens. It reveals the Boss methods in all their 
hideousness, and raises in one's mind a natural query as to the propriety 
or necessity of holding elections, with all their expense and bother, so 
long as Boss rule prevails. In this case HopkinB was the Bi>ss candidate 
on the Democratic side, and Connelly was a gentleman of the same 
political faith, who, smarting under a kick of the Boss's boot, ran as an 
Independent. Patterson was the Boss candidate on the Republican side. 
This triangular contest indicated a close tight from the start. And it 
was a close fight. Hopkins was declared elected by a trifling majority of 
2C1. A judicial recount reduced this majority down to 8, and showed 
that there had been a determined effort running throughout the whole 
164 precincts to count Hopkins in. Besides, the finger-marks of a great 
deal of fraud, which could not be inquired into, were plainly disclosed. 
In view of the fact that Connolly was a rebel against Boss rule, and that 
he had little expectation of being able to accomplish anything more than 
the defeat of Buckley's man, the outcome of the recount is peculiarly 
suggestive. The Bosses, it is known, constitute a mutual protection so- 
ciety, and readily undertake to help each other out. Connelly's rebellion 
was as dangerous to one as to the other ; hence the necessity for electing 
Hopkins. This is the explanation of the systematic fraud, in a small 
way, which ran through every precinct in the city. If, however, this 
thing is allowed to continue, is there any use in going through the farce 
of holding elections in the future ? 

ABOLISH TELEGRAPH POLES AND WIRES. 

The hanging of large masses of wires upon telegraph poles and over 
the roofs of houses has, for long years nast, been one of the greatest 
nuisances which large cities have had to contend with. For a time the 
fact that the necessities of civilization demanded the fullest telegraphic 
facilities, and that in order to have this it was necessary to endure the 
inconvenience of the wires, was a sufficient answer to the angry protests 
which their existence drew from all sides. Now, however, the matter 
stands in an entirely different position. The stream of modern invention 
has supplied the means of placing the telegraphic system entirely under- 
ground, and the dangerous and unsightly presence of those vast masses of 
wire, stretched along the streets and over the housetops, should no longer 
be tolerated. It is a well ascertained fact that the presence of these 
wires are a serious menace to the public safety in many respects, but 
particularly in the way in which they retard the movements of the fire 
department in cases of conflagration. Several half-heavted efforts have 
been made in this city to compel the various companies to remove their 
wires underneath the ground, but a judicious use of "soap" seemed to 
relieve the friction on the official mind. There is a hope, however, that 
the new Board of Supervisors will distinguish its advent into office by 
passing an effective ordinance on this subject, and then seeing that it is en- 
forced. Time will tell whether this hope is well founded or not ; mean- 
while, every private citizen, who is annoyed with telegraph wires on the 
house-top, is advised to cut them down. Without the permission of the 
owner they have no right to be there. 

"PRACTICAL POLITICS." 

The attack which is now being made upon St. John, the late Pro- 
hibition candidate, by the Republican press, at the instigation of the Re- 
publican party managers, is to those who, like the News Letter, occupy 
a purely independent position, instructive if not edifying. The Prohibi- 
tion movement has wounded the Republican party nigh unto death. It 
helped its defeat in this State in the last gubernatorial election, and it 
also cropped up as a very lively element in Ohio and other places. In 
the last Presidential contest, it contributed largely to the defeat of 
Blaine, and to-day it stands as a menace to the success if not the actual 
existence of the Republican party. Out of every five Prohibitionists it 
is safe to assume that four are otherwise Republican, but their leaders 
will not permit tbem to remain in the Republican ranks uolees their 
principles are emblazoned on the Republican banners — and that means 
defeat before the people for the present and for a long time to come, if 
not forever. The necessity, therefore, of getting these obnoxious Pro- 
hibition leaders out of the way and destroying their influence, is a clear 
necessity in the field of "practical politics.'' Intelligence, honor and 
manhood would suggest that this should be done by an open and forcible 
discussion of the principles at issue. But this is not the way of " prac- 
tical politics." "Practical politics" suggests the propriety of assailing 
St. John's personal character as a more effective way of accomplishing 
the desired end, and so that gentleman is being vigorously accused, all 
over the country, of having offered to retire during the campaign for a 
consideration. " Practical politics " is a curious if not elevating science. 

THE DEAD-LOCK. 
The people of this State must be delighted with the exhibition of 
practical anti-monopoly which is now being given by the fifteen anti- 
monopoly Democratic Senators. These gentlemen were instrumental in 
having the five brethren with whom they are associated denounced by the 
Stockton Convention as corruptionists, railroad tools, "no Democrats," 
etc. Now they ask those men, whom they have branded with personal 
dishonor and placed outside the party lines to come in and help them to 
organize the Senate. The read-outs have replied : " Well, you have 
placed us outside the party. If you want us to come in now and act with 
you as Democrats, recognize us as such by electing one of our number to 
the purely honorary position of President pro tern of the Chamber." To 
this the anti-monopolists have replied : " O, no ; we will give no recogni- 
tion. You must come in and do as we tell you, like dogs." This is the 
anti-monopoly position in a nut-shell. It is a position which, to use mild 
terms, is hardly justifiable, and it is taking about SI, 200 per day out of 
the taxpayers' pockets fnr nothing, without taking cognizance of the neces- 
sary legislation it is rendering impossible. And when it is borne in mil d 
that this action is taken by these alleged anti -monopolists because they, 
having possession, for the present, of the party machinery, expect to di- 
vide the Federal patronage among themselves and fear to recognize the 
read-outs because the President might do likewise, the beauty and virtue 
of anti-monopoly and its advantage to "the people " is seen in a still 
clearer light. It is, like Ben Butler's horny hand, a thing which should 
be put in a museum and kept there. 



.Fan 17, 1885. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



II 



TOWN CRIER. 



'* llc«r Iha Crier!" "Wbsl Lh« devil irl ihoul 

"One th»t wilt pi . -ir. with fOU." 

" He'd ft sling in his tail as long u a flftU, 

Vfhlob oudi htm gnra bolder and bolder. " 



On account of the unprecedented style in which the " Immortal Stiffs " 
exhibition has oaogut on to the popular pulse, the T. C. is mmpWled to 
dI a beautiful hand-painted sign bearing the legend : "Standing 
Soon Only." (Confidential— There are, of course, plenty of vacant seats 
in the front rows, but they are "reserved," and, if you desire to be ac- 
commodated with one of them, you wilt have to interview the cashier at 
the box office, who will charge you the modest sum of 50 cents extra for 
a coupon. The 7\ C. is no bigger fool than the common run of managers). 
The |K-rformance will begin this week with the rendition of a ravishing 
overture by tfafl Town Crier Orchestra, entitled, "The Devil's Tattoo, "in 
which His Satanic Majesty (disguised as a musician) will execute a diffi- 
cult xylophone solo upon attuued skulls. No applause desired. If the 
audience were to Signify their approval by an encore, His Majesty would 
be liable to play " Hell " in response— and this, as you can see, would in- 
volve probable consternation and loss of life among the deacons. There- 
fore, listen in silence and applaud with your ears. 

First upon the list of distinguished performers, this week, is the cele- 
brated Marquis D. Bore Rack, famed not only for the size of his head, but 
Era the immensity of its emptiness. The Marquis is reputed to possess the 
largest gall of any living man, but in this respect the T. C. iB inclined to 
think that common report is in error — Mr. Gee Whoa Toiler (exhibited 
last week) having recently developed an abnormal growth of bile, which 
entitles him to a prominence co-equal with the Marquis, if not beyond 
him. TiOrd D. Bore Rack will now waltz out in his usual pompous style, 
and deliver his "Sixty Thousand Reasons Why I Should be Governor, or 
i . 3. Senator, or Something, by Thunder." (While the Marquis is 
speaking, the orchestra will play, " Please Give Me an Office, Sir," and 
the gallery gods can prepare the hen fruit for the final burst of- approval. 

The programme next announces " Billy Potter's Son and Peter Hop 
Skins, in their Great Brother Act — the Twin Hangmen." The perform- 
ers will first bow their profound respects to the audience, after which they 
will engage in a superhuman effort each to hang the other upon a gallows 
specially prepared for the occasion, labeled, "The Recount." It is ar- 
ranged that Peter Hop Skins shall be victor, and the spectators will be 
amused by the startling spectacle of Billy Potter's son hanging by the 
neck until be is (apparently) dead. N. B. — But Billy will not be dead. 
Politicians only die once in a hundred years, and William is still on the 
shady side of fifty. The act will conclude with a grand tableau illumin- 
ated by blue lights, showing a gigantic gallows containing the dangling 
bodies of seventeen criminals, with the words, " Hop Skins' Choice " in 
fiery letters overhead. 

The orchestra will now discourse circus music, and Signor Hard Wag 
Near will become visible, holding in one hand a copy of The Golden Ear, 
and in the other an empty purse. Signor Wag Near will explain to the 
audience that the Ear contains the former contents of the purse, but 
under no consideration will he undertake to refill the money-bag from the 
Ear. The Signor's performance will be chiefly interesting in that it will 
serve to illustrate how easily a purse may become the victim of misplaced 
confidence. 

We have here, confined in an iron cage, the great What Cheer House 
evangelist, Hurrah -for- God Coax, captured, after a terrible struggle, in 
the mire of bigotry. We keep Mr. Coax caged because he insists upon 
going to Sacramento and pulling for Sargent. As we think Mr. Sargent 
hardly ripe enough to be pulled, we deem it best to restrain his would- 
be plucker. Mr. Coax will now sing: 

'* Oh ! how I love office ! 

Oh ! how I hate labor ! 
Oh ! how I like fat sits 1 

Because they bring me coin !" 

Our next marvel is Mr. Bill He Guns, who, while he would scorn to 
be called a cow, struts when you refer to him as a boss. He iB associated 
in business with Mr. See See Buckle Lee (mentioned last week). The 
firm is engaged in the great game of political draw poker. Mr. Buckle 
Lee goes the blind, and Mr. He Guns does the straddling. Between the 
two the public pot is about aa completely raked as a well-kept flower-bed. 

The performance will close with the recitation, by Consul Bumble, of 
his side-splitting parody, "The Heathen Chinee," composed after sev- 
eral years of next-door-neighborship with the denizens of the Celestial 
Kingdom: 

" Which I rise to explain — and my language is plain — 
That, for ways that are dark and for tricks that are vain, 
The heathen Chinee is peculiar; 
but when it comes down to genuine eccentricity, to concentrated and un- 
mitigated artifice, to sombre and inexplicable blackness, I most humbly 
submit that I am entitled to both the bun and the baker." 

It Is hereby respectfully suggested to the powers above, that the 
vapory substance known as the air we breathe be ordered removed for 
the benefit of science. Astronomers, for whom, as a class, the world is 
not a big enough field of operation, have been compelled to Bit down in 
sober disgust, because the presence of the atmosphere obscures their 
vision of the starry globes. On account of the air, they say, their view 
of the sidereal realm is comparable to that of the man who sees a 
house through a swift-moving body of water : Everything is blurred, in- 
distinct and unsatisfactory. Omnipotence will at once perceive that 
the atmosphere is a nuisance— to the astronomers — and will observe that 
He is x'rged to adopt one of two plans : either remove the air or trans- 
late the astral peekers. In consideration of the comfort of lawyers, 
preachers, demagogues and lecturers, it would, perhaps, be advisable for 
Him to choose the latter course. 

Professor Guyot has estimated that Manhattan Island is sinking at 
t le rate of twenty-three and one-half inches in a hundred years. About 
two thousand years hence Sammy Tilden will jump out of his warm bed 
at Grammercy Park, look out of the window, and exclaim : " Holy crow, 
gardener ! You've let that hose squirt all night ? " 



Dr. Dorchester, one of the Almighty's advance agents, at a recent 
convention .if Baptist elders in New York, made the following ittertlon : 
1 A preacher has to contend with many abnormal growths in the obi 

with persons fancying themselves the chimb militant, but who art- really 
the church termagant ; with the church somnolent; with the church of 
Ineffable rest ; with the church of holy cranks ; with the cbOTOh of 
perpetual tramps, who live on star preacher diet." And then the 
doctor asks : " Who is sufficient for these thingB?" The T. V. respect- 
fully refers the troubled elder to his Satanic Majesty, who, if current 
report be true, has pitch hot at all hours and is continually going about 
roaring for a job. If the Devil cannot solve the " abnormal growth" 
problem, it will be useless for either the doctor or the T. V. to fret their 
gizzards about it. Pass the ice water. 

Mr. Duncan C. Ross, the brawny Scott, having achieved moderate 
notoriety as a wrestler and saloonkeeper, has applied for admission to 
the Trinity Theological Seminary, Toronto, alleging that it is his desire 
to become a minister. The T. C. hopes that the faculty of Trinity will 
considerately grant Mr. Ross's request. The Prince of Darkuess has been 
having things too much his own way nf late years, and haw tripped on 
the lightweights of the religious ring without evident puffing. The pul- 
pit is in need of an ally who can meet Beelzebub in a fair fight, " catch- 
as-catch-can," "Scotch back-hold," or "arms' length," and down him in 
the first round. Mr. Ross is a likely man for the place. D. D. him at 
once. 

The Rev. George Sexton, of London, England, has only been a resi- 
dent of San Francisco for a few days, and therefore may be pardoned for 
the simplicity of his faith. " All the evidence we have," said this gentle- 
man in a recent lecture, " shows that there is a God." Mr. Sexton, you, 
sir, are evidently not a reader of Mr. Pickering's morning paper. The T. 
C, recommends that you give it a careful perusal. If upon pondering one 
of Loring's double -join ted, triple-plated, back-stitch editorials, you stilt 
persist in your belief that there is a God, the T. C. will challenge you to 
prove that He is not asleep or gone on a journey. 

Rev. Dr. Newman was dismissed from the pastorship of Madison- 
avenue Congregational Church, New York, by vote of the Board of 
Trustees, at a meeting held last Monday. Inasmuch as Dr. Newman 
has been a resident of San Francisco for about two months past, the ac- 
tion of the New Yoik Trustees Boraewhat resembles that of the gunner 
who prepared and ignited the priming after his cannon had been prema- 
turely discharged. " Dotn it," said he, "if that gun wants to go off with- 
out axin' leave, I'll get even on the touch-hole, anyhow." 

Dr. Samuel Merritt, of Oakland, was thrown from his buggy re- 
cently, and suffered a fracture of the shoulder blade. The same 
evening there was a unanimous glance by the scribes of San Francisco 
toward the reportorial pigeon-holes that contain the doctor's obituary ; but 
it was only a glance. Reporters have been disappointed so many times 
by the genial doctor that they fail to respond with their usual alacrity. 

Mr. W. H. Vanderbllt offered to present U. S. Grant with 8150,000. 
Gen. Grant declined to accept. Mr. Vanderbilt then tendered the sum 
to Mrs. Grant. The lady politely refused the offer. Van, old boy, the 
T. C. would hate to see you throw that money into New York Bay, in 
disgust; hence he modestly informs you that his postoffice address is 609 
Merchant Btreet, San Francisco, Gal. Postage stamps taken. 

Dr. Carver is now engaged in an effort to break 60,000 puces of coal 
in six days, and will receive $5,000 for the job. Whether the Doctor 
Bucceeds or fails, iB not important, but it is entertaining to know that 
there are just as expert gunners as Dr. Carver in Sing Sing, who break 
rocks six days out of the seven, and receive nothing in compensation ex- 
cept their bed and board. 

An authority on wine bibbing explains that " port, which was form- 
erly the favorite beverage of statesmen, has become the coveted resource 
of invalids," and is consequently going out of fashion. This Bettles the 
disputed title to pre-eminence as between the live statesman and the 
moribund sick man. It also proves that lager beer is the legislator's 
chosen bath. 

Our Harry George has returned to London, after a prolonged lec- 
turing tour in Scotland. He professes to be delighted with the crofters. 
" A croft audience," be says, *' is warm and responsive, and never misBes 
a point." We opine, then, that the listeners did not follow Mr. George 
very closely in his remarks ; if they had, they would have missed a good 
many points. 

Policeman, to Lottery Agent— "I see you." Lottery Agent to 
Policeman— " I will see you." The former grins pleasantly and passes 
on, and the latter winks to MmBelf as he rolls a cigarette and counts up 
the number of tickets Bold. 

The Washington Monument is boaetingly referred to by a news- 
paper correspondent as " one of the greatest wonders of the world." The 
most astounding feature of the structure, so far discovered, is the fact 
that it is completed. 

The death-like silence which has, for some time, pervaded the Franco- 
Chinese frontier, justifies the suspicion that the belligerent nations have 
heard of the arrival of the Chronicle's special correspondent. 

A backwoods bride cried bitterly because there was not a crowd in 
the church when her wedding took place. She thought everybody ought 
to have come to the circus and admired her new gown. 

The T. C. suggests that a committee of our Irish fellow citizens pay a 
visit to Sacramento. A dynamite scare may have some effect in arousing 
the stubborn and somnolent legislators. 

Turkish women believe in charms. In this respect they are only 
different from Turkish men in a comparative sense. The latter believe 
in charmers. 

The germs of typhoid fever are said to be transmitted by milk. At- 
tention, dudes ! Beware of bread and milk. 

Bad things should be punished. We reckon the big drum is beaten 
so hard because it is base. 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Jan. 17, 1885. 



C. P. R. R. 



Trains Leave, anil are Dae to Arrive at, 
BAN FRANCISCO. 



LEAVB 

(lor; 


From Jan. 4, 1SSB. i 


ARRIVB 

(from) 






"10:10 a. 






6:40 p. 








8:00 i. 


. . . Delta, Redding and Portland 


6:40 p. 


•3:30 p. 




"10:40 A. 






5:40 P. 


■1:00 p. 




10:10 A. 


"5:00 p. 


. . . Livermore and Pleasanton 


•8.40 A. 


3:30 p. 


. . 1 Mojave, Deming, ) Express 

.. X El Paso and East, f Emigrant 


10:40 A. 


7:00 p. 


6:10 A. 


10:00 i. 




3:40 p. 


3:00 p. 


. . 1 Ogden and East / Express 

..( " " ( Emigrant 


11:10 A. 


7:00 p. 


9:40 A. 


8:00 A. 


Red Bluff via Marysville 


5:40 p. 


7:30 A. 


— Sacramento via Livermore 


5:40 p. 


8:00 A. 


.... " via Eenicia 


6:40 p. 


3:00 P. 


.... " via Benicia 


11:10 A. 


4:00 p. 


" via Benicia 


10:10 A. 


•4:00 p. 


— Sacramento River Steamers 


•6:00 A. 


7:30 A. 




"3:40 P. 


(10:00 a. 




13:40 p. 


3:00 p. 


«< 


9:40 A. 


7:30 A. 


Stockton via Livermore 


5:40 p. 


•3:30 P. 




■10:40 A 


"9:30 A. 


....Tulare and Fresno — 


••"7:40 p 



A for Morning 1 . 



p for Afternoon. 



frrom -SAN FRANCISCO," Dally. 

To EAST OAKLAND-»6:00, *6:30, 7:00, 7:30, 8:00, 
8:30, 9:00, 9:30, 10:00, 10:30, 11:00, 11:30, 12:00, 12:30, 
1:00, 1:30, 2:00, 2:30, 3:00, 3:30, 4:00, 4:30, 5:00, 6:30, 
6:00, 6:30, 7:00, 8:00, 9:00, 10:00, 11:00, *12:00. 

To FRUIT VALE— *6:00, "6:30, *7:00, *7:30, *8:00, *8:30, 
"3:30, *4:00, *4:30, *5:00, *5:30, *6:00, *6:30, 9:00. 

To FRUIT VALE (via Alameda) — *9:30, 6:30, 111:00, 
'12:00. 

To ALAMEDA— *6:00, *6:30, 7:00, *7:30, 8:00, "8:30, 9:00, 
9:30,10:00, 110:30, 11:00, 111:30, 12:00, J12:30, 1:00, 
11:30, 2:00, 3:00, 3:30, 4:00, 4:30, 5:00, 5:30, 6:00, 6:30, 
7:00, 8:00, 9:00, 10:00, 11:00, *12:00. 

To BERKELEY — *6:00, *6:30, 7:00, '7:30, 8:00, *8:30, 
9:00, 19:30, 10:00, 110:30, 11:00, 111:30, 12:00, 1:00, 
2:00, 3:00, 4:00, 4-30, 6:00, 6:30, 6:00, 6:30, 7:00, 8:00, 
9:00, 10:00, 11:00, *12:00. 

To WEST BERKELEY— »6:00, *6:30, 7:00, *7:30, 18:00, 
•8:30, 9:00, 10:00, 11:00, JUOO, 2:00, 3:00, 4:00, *4:30, 
5:00, *5:30, 6:00, "6:30, 7:00. 

To "SAN FRANCISCO," Dally. 

From FRUIT VALE-*6:23, *6:53, *7:23, '■•7:53, ••'•8:23, 
#8:53, *9:2S, '10:21, *4:23, #4:53, *5:23, "6:53, *6:23, 
*6:53, 7:25, 9:50. 

From FRUIT VALE (via Alanieda)—*5;15, '5:45, 16:45, 
J9:15, *3:15. 

From EAST OAKLAND-*5:30, *6:00, 6:30, 7:00, 7:30, 
8:00, 8:30, 9:00, 9:30, 10:00, 10:30, 11:00, 11:30, 12:00, 
12:30, 1:00, 1:30, 2:00, 2:30, 3:00, 3:30, 4:00, 4:30, 5:00, 
5:30, 6:00, 6:30, 7:00, 7:57, 8:57, 9:57, 10:67. 

From BROADWAY, Oakland -*5:37, *6:07, 6:37,7:07, 
7:37.8:07,8:37, 9:07, 9:37, 10:07, 10:37, 11:07, 11:37, 12:07, 
12:37, 1:07, 1:37, 2:07, 2:37, 3:07, 3:37, 4:07, 4:37, 6:07, 
6:37,6:07, 6:37, 7:07, 8:06, 9:06, 10:06, 11:06. 

From ALAMEDA— *6;22, '5:52, "6:82, 6:52, *7:22, 7:62, 
*8:22, 8:52, 9:22, 9:52, t!0:22, 10:52, 111:22, 11:52, 
U2:22, J2:52, {1:22, 1:52, 2:52, 3:22, 3:52, 4:22, 4:52, 
5:22, 5:52, 6:22, 6:52, 7:52, 8:52, 9:52, 10:52. 

From BERKELEY-»5:15, *5:45, *6:15, 6:45, *7:15, 7:45, 
•8:15, 8:45, 19:15, 9:45, U0:15, 10:45, 111:15, 11:45, 
12:45, 1:45, 2:45, 3:45, 4:15, 4:45, 5:15, 6:45,6:16, 6:45, 
7:45, 8:45, 9:45, 10:45. 

FROM WEST BKKKELEY — *5:45, *6:15, 6:45, +7:15, 
7:46, 8:45, (9:16, 9:45, 10:45, 112:45, 1:45, 2:45, 3:45, 
4:46, »6:15, 5:45, '6:15, 6:45, »7:15. 



From SAN FRANCISCO— *7:15, 9:15, 11:15, 1:16, 3:15, 

5:16. 
From OAKLAND— »6:16, 8:15, 10:15, 12:15, 2:16, 4:16. 

•Sundays excepted. ISundays only. 



Standard Time furnished by RANDOLPH & CO., S. F. 



A. N. TOWNE, 

Gen. Manager. 



T. H. GOODMAN, 
Gen. Pass, and Tkt. Agt. 



Glaciers of the Pyrenees.— Dr. A. Penck 
bus recently stuHied the old glaciers of the 
Pyrenees in detail, and has found remarkable 
differences between them and the Alpine glaciers 
of tbe Ice period. Even at that remote period 
the Pyrenean glaciers were of far smaller extent 
than those of the Alps— in the western part of 
tbe Pyrenees, indeed, there existed not a single 
one. Wherever traces of glaciers could be found 
they were accompanied by lake-beds. These 
have by now been rilled up for the greatest part, 
at least in the lower altitudes ; the only lakes 
still existing being situated in altitudes of be- 
tween 1,500 and 3,000 metres. 



"Are you aware,' asked the parson, "that 
you will have to answer for every idle word at 
the last day?" "Well," replied the trifler, 
" there's some comfort in that. The trial will 
last so long that eternity will have nearly passed, 
and, therefore, one's punishment won't be so 
very severe." — Boston Transcript. 




Broad Gauge. 



COMMMENCING SUNDAY, NOV. 16th, 1SS4, and 
until f»rther notice, Boats and Trains will leave from 
and arrive at San Francisco Passenger Depot, MAR- 
KET-STREET WHARF, as follows 



Lbavr S. F. 



Week 
Days. 



Sundays. 



Destination. Arrive in S. F. 



Petal uma, 

Santa Rosa, 

Fulton, 

Windsor, 

Healdsburg, 

Cloverdale 

and 

Way Stations. 



Sundays. 



Days. 



7:45 a. M. 13:00 a. M. | Guerneville. |6:00 p. m.|6:00 p. m. 

Stages connect at Santa Rosa for Sebastopol. At 
Clairville for Skaggs Springs, and at Cloverdale for 
Highland Springs, Kelseyvitle, Soda Bay, Lakeport, 
Bartlett Springs. Ukiah, Eureka, Navarro Ridge, Men- 
docino City and the Geysers. 

EXCURSION TICKETS from Saturdays to Mondays, 
to Petaluma, SI 76 ; to Santa Rosa, S3 ; to Healdsburg, 
S4 ; to Cloverdale, $5. 

EXCURSION TICKETS, good for Sundays only— To 
Petaluma, SI 50 ; to Santa Rosa, §2 ; to Healdsburg, $3; 
to Cloverdale, S4 50 ; to Guerneville, $3. 

From San Francisco for Point Tiburon and San Ra- 
fael, Week Days— 7:45 A. M., 9:10 a. m., 3:30 P. M., 5:00 
p. m.; Sundays: 8:00 a. m., 10:30 a. m., 2:30 p. m., 
6:00 p. m 

To San Francisco from San Rafael, Week Days— 
8:00 a. m., 10:20 a. m , 3:40 p. M., 6:05 p. w.; Sun- 
days: 8:10 A. M, 11:45 A. M., 3:45 p. M., 5:05 p. m. 

To San Francisco from Point Tiburon, Week Days— 
8:20 a. M., 10:45 a. m. 4:05 p. m., 5:30 P. M.; Sundays: 
8:35 A. M., 12:10 P. M., 4:10 P. M., 5:30 P. m. 

PETER J. McGLYNN, ARTHUR HUGHES. 
Gen. Pass, and Tkt. Agt. General Manager. 



SONOMA VALLEY R. R. 

Steamer JAMES M. DONAHUE Leaves Sau Francisco, 

and Connects with Trains at SONOMA 

LANDING, as follows: 

4. (~\ f\ P.M., Daily (Sundays excepted), from WASH- 
• v - /v - / INGTON-STREKT WHARF, for the Town 
f Sonoma, Glen Ellen and Way Points. 

Sunday Excursions. 

8.QO A *■ (Sundays only), from WASHINGTON- 
.^,\j STREET WHARF, for the Town of So- 
noma, Glen Ellen and Way Points. Round-Trip Tickets : 
To Sonoma, §1; to Glen Ellen, §1 60. 
PETER J. McGLYNN, ARTHUR HUGHES, 

Gen. Pass, and Tkt. Agt. General Manager. 



QUITS. 

Indeed, they have not grieved me sore, 
Your faithlessness and your deceit ; 

The truth is, I was troubled more 
How I should make a good retreat ; 

Another way my heart now tends ; 

We can cry quits, and be good friends. 

I found you far more loveable, 
Because your fickleness I saw, 

For I myself am changeable, 
And like, you know, talike doth draw ; 

Thus neither needs to make amends ; 

We can cry quits, and be good friends. 

While I was monarch of your heart, 
My heart from you did never range ; 

But from my vassal did I part, 

When you your lady-love did change; 

No penalty the change attends ; 

We can cry quits, and be good friends. 

Farewell ! We'll meet again some day, 
And all our fortunes we'll relate ; 

Of love let's have no more to say, 
'Tis clear we're not each other's fate. 

Our game in pleasant fashion ends ; 

We can cry quits, and be good friends. 

— Chambers' Journal. 

A private letter received from a Japanese 
official in Tokio states that his Government will 
soon call a conference of the foreign Ministers 
at the cnpital to consider a proposed revision of 
nearly all the treaties between Japan and other 
powers. 




( G> J? JVI LROAD.^ ] 
BROAD GATGE. 

Winter Time Schedule. 



Commencing- Sunday, Nov. 16, 1884, 
And until further notice, Passenger Trains will leave 
from and arrive at San Francisco Passenger Depot 
(Townsend st., between 3d and 4th streets),as follows: 



LEAVE 

8. p. 



t6:50 A.M. 

3:30 a m 
10:40 A.M 
*3:30 p.m 

4:30 p. M 
"5:15 p.m 

6:30 p.m 



8:30 a.m. 
10:40 a.m 
*3:30p.m 

4:30 p.m 



10:40 A.M. 
"3:30 P.M. 



10:40 a.m, 
*3:30 P.M. 



DESTINATION. 



.San Mateo, Redwood,. 
....and Menlo Park.... 



s. P. 



6:35 a.m. 
*8:10 A.M. 

9:03 A.M. 
'10:02 am. 

3:36 p.m. 
t5:02 p.m. 

6:08 P.M. 



..Santa Clara, San Joseand.. 
. .Principal Way Stations. . . 



03 a.m. 
;02a.m. 
:36 p.m. 
08 p. M. 



Gilroy, Pajaro, Castroville 
...Salinas and Monterey ... 



U2 A.M- 
OS p.m- 



.Hollister and Tres Pinos. 



02 a.m. 

:08 P M. 



10:40 a.m. ( Watsonville, Aptos, Sonuel I j 
^iOP.M "( (Camp Ua[>itola)&Santa Cruz. I J 
10:40 a.m.1-( .Soledad and Way Stations. J-| 



3 p.m. 
I P.M. 



♦Sundays excepted. tSundays only (Sportsmen's Train). 



£3TStandard ok Time.— Trains are run on Pacific 
Standard Time {Randolph & Co.), which is Ten (10) 
minutes faster than San Francisco Local Time. 



STAGE CONNECTIONS are made with the 10:40 a. m. 
Train, except PESCADERO Stages via San Mateo and 
Redwood, which connect with 8:30 A. m. Train. 

SPECIAL ROUND-TRIP TICKETS -At Reduced 
Rates— to Monterey, Aptos, Soquel and Santa Cruz; 
also to Paraiso and Paso Robles Springs. 

EXCURSION TICKETS 

Sold Sunday Morning ; good for 

Return same day. 

For Saturday, f Sold Saturday and Sunday only ; 

Sunday and-j good for Return until following Mon- 

Monday (day, inclusive, at the following rates: 



For Sundays only, 



Round Trip c„ n Sat to Round Trip „ Sat to 

from San Sk? Mon. from San £!?"■ Mon. 



Francisco to 



San Bruno.. 
Millbraie .... 
Oak Grove.. 
San Mateo. 
Belmont.... 
Redwood.... 
Fair Oaks.. . 
Menlo Park. 
Mayfield.... 



75 
1 00 

1 no 

1 25 
1 25 
1 25 



Tkt. 



- 60 
65 
90 

1 10 

i as 

1 40 

1 60 
1 00 

1 75 



Francisco to 



Mnunt'nVifw 
Lawrences... 
Santa Clara . 

San Jose 

Gilroy 

Aptos 

Soquel 

Santa Cruz.. 
.Monterey . . . 



Si 50 jg2 00 
1 50 



1 7;". 

1 7:-. 

2 75 



2 50 
2 50 

4 00 

5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 



TICKET OFFICES. - Passenger Depot, Townsend 
street; Valencia-street Station, and No. 613 Market 
street, Grand Hotel. 
A. C. BASSETT, H. R. JUDAH, 

Superintendent. Asst. Pass. & Tkt. Agt. 

^- SOUTHERN DIVISIONS. *3S 
For points on Southern Divisions and the East, see 
C. P. R. R. Time Scuedulb. 



REPARTEE. 

They were lunching, one day, 

In a handsome cafe, 

And she happened to say, 

As she noticed the way 
That he and the ice-cream were in unity, 
" Can you eat ice-cream with impunity ? " 

(This incident happened in June,) 

And he made the reply, 

With a wink of the eye, 

" No, but I can with a spoon." 

But her triumph came soon ; 

As they left the saloon, 
He gave her a good opportunity ; 

"And now, Bessie, dear, 

As the weather is clear, 
Can you take a walk with impunity ?" 

Her smile was as bright as tbe moon, 

And deliciously sly 

Came the mocking reply, 

" No, but I can with a spoon." 

— Ben Wood Davis in Life. 



Scene In the Chinese War. — Captain of iron- 
clad to artilleryman: Do you see that Chinese 
General there about three miles off ? Let him 
have one of those eight inch shells in the eye. 
Artilleryman, equal to the situation: Aye, aye, 
sir. Which eye, your honor? 

—From the French, 



.Ian 17, 1 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



13 



"BIZ." 



The rains b ntJnuous, with little oamfcton for vwki put 

Siring ujt f.ir tin- hmoii » mlo f.ill "f over 1- InohM, whlofa li more than 
nubh thaA of * like period in l»L This fft<rt of mail U the oann of 
free **U» «f Wheat by f.irmor* t.< exporters, they now feeling 001 
of ,tn >ii, During the pjwt tfii dsys. owing to f»Tar»ble Bag- 

1 of Wheat was run t, and even at tl.40 

paretL Several thousand tons of chploe White Wtai I bands; 

DOt dace, then there hiw beeo a reaction, and now $1 32J r 1.35 per ctl. is 
the top prim for choice Shipping, Shipment! ol both ^ heat and Flour 
Unned upon a liberal soaJe, and veaeela upon the berth have quick 
dinpatch for the United Kingdom. Grain freights have undergone a very 
material advance within a few weeks' time. In mid December wooden 

ships were chartered at I' I Be. to Liverpool ; iron, £'1 I'm. to I'. K.; but 
now the rate is up to Liverpool direct to £1 17*. 6d.j t" G". K... iron, £2 
.*m , while soma ship owners are asking an advance upon these rates. 

Quicksilver. J, B. Randol gives the product of Quicksilver in Cali- 
fornia at 31,913 H.u-k-*, against 46,725 in 1883. 52,7ft. in 1882, 60,851 in 
L88L and 69,926 in L880, The lowest price in 1881 was 52(5, and the high 
per flask. The highest yield by mines was that of the New 
Almaden -20,000 flasks. 

Overland Shipments for the month of November, per Central and 
Southern Pacific railroads, have been given to the preas, in pounds. 
IV. in 

C. P. R. R. S. P. R. R. 

San Francisco 6,712. 490 G,901,88G 

Oakland -Sixteenth street 533,010 298,430 

Los Angeles 261,330 1,560,020 

Stockton 155,780 3,500 

MarysvMe 57,850 1,450 

Sacramento 960,690 5*7.001) 

San Jose 792,300 302,340 

Grand total 9,473,450 9,744,620 

A private Grain Circular before us, dated January 5th, says : Sales 
of Wheat daring December have been very large, and at least one hun- 
dred and fifty to two hundred thousand tons must have changed hands. 
In the beginning of the month prices were firm at SI 30@$ 32J $ cental 
for No. 1 grades, free on Board, but a weeker feeling set in, and about 
Christinas cargoes free on Board could be secured at 51 27$. This was 
the lowest price reached during the month, and before the end of Decem- 
ber values had again advanced to the figures ruling in the early part of 
the month. During the past week a further advance to SI 35 fe? ctl., free 
no Board for No. 1 grades, has taken place, aud the market closes firm at 
this figure. The improved tone of the Wheat market is owing solely to 
the late advance in the Europeau market, and only a small portion of 
such advance has accrued to Wheat here, the larger portion having been 
absorbed by freights. Producers have been, and are now, free sellers of 
Wheat, sn that exporters find no difficulty in securing readily all they re- 
quire. This probably will continue during this month and February, as 
many farmers will desire to dispose of their Wheat before taxes will be 
assessed in the beginning of March. Wheat at SI 35 i^ ctl., free on 
Board, with freight per iron vessel at £2 5s. Od. for orders to United 
Kingdom, with exchange at 50 1-lGd., and with cost of insurance, is the 
equivalent of about 38a. I0d. # quarter of 500 lbs. cost, freight and in- 
surance, which is about 91. above present sale value in Europe. During 
October a shipment of 21,682 ctls. Wheat was made per Southern Pacific 
Itailroad, from Los Angeles, via New Orleans, to Europe. The large 
quantity of Wheat still on hand- -say 1,080,000 tons of 2,000 lbs.— proves 
what we have repeatedly said, that the principal reason for the decline 
in freights last October was the action of a few ship-owners, who pressed 
their ships for charter at ruinously low rates, when momentarily there 
was little or no demand for tonnage, owing to a sudden decline in the 
European Wheat markets. This injudicious action on the part of a few 
led to a sudden drop in freights, which reached such low figures as were 
not by any means warranted by the existing circumstances. It always 
is an easy matter to bring about a decline in freights, but it is generally 
extremely difficult to again obtain higher rates after ship-owners and ex- 
porters have once become thoroughly frightened regarding the future. 
Agents of ship-owners here, as a rule, considered it injudicious to accept 
the ruinously low freights, and did their utmost toward bringing about 
a change for the better. At first their efforts were not fully appreciated 
by all the ship-owners they represented, and we ourselves have been 
blamed for not hastening and aggravating the decline in freights by inju- 
dicious efforts to get exporters to make offers for vessels, not even ready 
for loading, at rates even lower than those accepted for a few ships at the 
time of the greatest depression in freights. When the welcome Decem- 
ber rains set in, ship-owuers generally, and especially those residing in 
Europe, were quite willing, by holding back their ships, to assist in 
bringing about the desired advance in freight rates, which already 
amounts to from ten to fifteen shillings U? ton; but they should now take 
care not to fall into the other extreme, and demand rates which export- 
ers can not afford to pay, and thus stop business.^ If this be done, the 
disengaged tonnage in port must again increase, which, together with the 
fact that numerous vessels are being attracted to our coast by the im- 
provement in freights which has already taken place, must necessarily 
again cause a reaction, for freight rates depend upon the supply and de- 
mand, just as much as the price of merchandise. 

Charters.— We note the following engagements for the week : Br. iron 
ship Iuversnaiad, 1,550 tons, Wheat to Cork, U. K., £2 2s. 6J. Br. bk; 
James G. Bain, 597 tons, now at San Pedro, Wheat, thence to London ; 
terms private. Br. ship Anglo-America, 1,553 tons, Wheat to Cork, U. 
K. or Continent, private. Br. iron ship Brodick Castle, 1,785 tona. 
Wheat to Cork, U. K., Havre or Antwerp, £2 5s.: if to a direct port, 2s. 
6d. less. Br. iron ship Cockermouth, 1,296 tons, Wheat to Cork, U. K., 
private, chartered in England. Br. iron ship Dunnottar Castle, 1,702 
tons, Wheat to Cork, U. K., Havre or Antwerp, £2 5s., chartered prior 
to arrival. Br. iron ship Troop, 1,526 tons, Wheat to Cork, U. K., £2, 
chartered prior to arrival. Br. iron ship Lord Dufferin, 1.697 tons, Wheat 
to Cork, U. K., £2 2s. 6d. (a recharter). Br. iron ship Downshire, 2,263 



tons, Wheal to Oork, D". K., £2 2s. 6 Br. iron ship 

Kansunda, L.Oftfl tons. Wheal to Cork, \\ K , BS 2s. 6oi Br. iron ihtp 
Celtic Monarch. 2,061 tons, Wheat to Cork, \>. K.. £2 6s. Mr. iron iblp 

Loon Trool, 1,460 tons, Wheal to Oork. U. K., gS 3s, 6 1. 
Ship Oriental, M»0 tons, chartered by 0, P. B Ft Co to load Coal el 
Taoom* for this port, private. Baric I'M win Reed, l.h-i tone, w b 

Cork, l". K.. £2; direct port. *J«. til. lens. Ship. Challenirer, 1..T.' 1 ' 
Wheat to fork, U. K.. owner's account. Ship Joseph S. Spinney, 1,895 
tons, Wheat to Cork, I'. K . £2; Liverpool direct. £1 17*. 6a. Iron hark 
AnniHi Johnson, 997 torts, Coal from Seattle to tin* port, private, Ger. 
iron hark Fulda, 938 tonn, Win'. it to Cork, V. K., B2 Se. ship Palestine, 
1 397 tons, Wheat to Liverpool or Dublin direct, £1 18s. Br. iron ship 
Star of Erin-. !M*.i tons, Wheal to Cork, V. K . B25*. Br. iron ibip Sutb 
erlandshire, Wheat to Cork, U. K., £'2 5s. Br. iron hark Snowdon, 1,060 
tons. Wheat to Cork, V. K., £3 5s. Italian bark Bit, 963 tons, wheal 
tot \.rk, U. K.., or Continent, t'2. Br. iron ship Montgomeryshire, 1,401 
tons. Wheat to Cork, \'. K., £2. Srhr. Excelsior, 931 tons, Lumber 
from Humboldt to Vustralia. There is now on the heith ahnnt los turn 
tons register; same time last year, 50,000 tons. Disengaged, 80,000 tons; 
same rate 18*4, 162,000 tons. 

Arrivals from European ports, during the past ten days, have been 
quite numerous, and include two ships from Antwerp the Reaper and 
Sea King. These two vessels bring large and valuable cargoes say 
42,000 bxs. Window Glass, 1,000 tone Scrip Iron, l.ioo bbls. Tar, 1,900 
drums Glycerine, 1,500 bbls Cement, 3,000 Demijohns, 500 bbls. Sulphur, 
and a large amount of Chemicals, etc. 

From London and Liverpool six ship* have come to hand ; Aristo- 
mene, 137 days from Liverpool, with 2,370 tons of Coal ; Berwick Law, 
with 7,177 cks. Cement, -1,056 bxs. Tin Plate, etc.; from London ; L>un- 
notar Castle, from same, with 7,000 bbls. Cement and General Mdse.; 
Sierra Nevada, 129 days from Liverpool, with 2,100 tons Coal ; < 'ity of 
Madras, 109 days from Liverpool, with 2,317 tons Coal; Leicester Castle, 
from Liverpool, with 5,545 sks. Salt, 2,500 tous Coal, aud Chemicals. 

Cardiff.— The ship Lord Downshire, 139 days, has 2,000 tons Coal, 
1,000 tonB Coke and 500 tons Pig Iron. 

Orient.— The Pacific Mail Steamship City of Peking, hence Jan. 10th, 
carried to China in Treasure. $257,824 55, and for cargo: G30.000 yds. 
Cottons, 6,954 bbls. Flour. 12,000 lbs.' Ginseng, 485 pkps. Provisions, 
etc.— value §119,900. To Japan: 315 bbls. Flour and Mdse.— value 
$18,441, To Singapore: 143 cases Canned Goods — value 3649. To India: 
3,142 bbls. Flour— value 810,054. To Bombay: Treasure— value $102,000. 

Hongkong. — Ship Highlander, hence Jan. 9tb, carried 18,000 bbls. 
Flour, 8,255 lbs. Fungus, etc.— value $70,160. 

Havre. — Stror. Bordeaux, hence Jan. 9th, carried 750 bales Bags and 
70,036 ctls. Wheat— value 698,540. 

Liverpool. — Ship Oregon, hence Jan. 9th, carried 5,099 bbls. Flour, 
493 cs. Honey, and 34,877 ctls. Wheat ; value, §68,912. 

Honolulu.— The Oceanic steamer Alameda, from the Islands, brought 
for cargo 20,000 pkgs. Sugar, 550 bags Rice, 3,283 bchs. Bananas, etc. 
The britf Claus Spreckels, from same, had 5,390 bags Sugar, 1,000 bags 
Rice. 

To the Housewife. — If you want your table to look inviting, beautify 
it with the delicious Table Fruit and Honey, Preserves, etc., put up by 
the King-Morse Cann ing Co. 

The very choicest products of Japanese art are to be found at 
Marsh &. Co.'s, No. 625 Market street, at reasonable prices. Examine 
them. " 

They are having an uncommonly hard Winter over in Europe. Cold 
weather and heavy snows in Russia, Poland and Austria have even driven 
wolves down to the Danube, and even there are nearly starved. 



The new Photograph Gallery of Williams & Norton, 914 Market 
street, bet. Powell and Stockton, use only the San Francisco Dry Plate. 



The great emporium for Japanese Goods is at Marsh & Co.'s, No. 
625 Market street. They have complete facilities for obtaining the best. 



MOUNT VERNON COMPANY, BALTIMORE. 

The undersiffned having been appointed AGENTS FOR THE PAC1F C COAST 
for the sale of tho manufactures of above company, have now in store: 

Sail Ducli-n.il Numbers; 
Hydraulic -all Numbers: 
Draper and Wagon Duck. 

From 30 to 1-20 Inches Wide, and a Complete Assortment 0! All Qualities 28J Inc 
DUCK., rrom 7 ozs. to 15 ozs., inclusive. 

MURPHY, GRANT & CO. 



JOSEPH GILLGTT'S STEEL PENS. 

Gold Medal, Paris, 1878. 
l^ioia by all Stationers. Sole Agent for the United States: 

5S MR. HENRY HOE, 91 John street, N. Y. Jan. 6. 



ALASKA COMMERCIAL COMPANY 

No. 310 Sansome Street, 

San Francisco, 

WBOJjESAJjE D JE ALE It 8 IN STUMS. 



COKE CHEAPEST FUEL. 

Redaction la Price: Wholesale Price, 50 cents per barrel : 
Retail Price, 60 cents per barrel, at the works of the SAN FKANC1SCO GAS- 
LIGHT COMPANY, Howard and First streets, and foot of Second et. Jan. 12. 

AT) T) T "7 T.T Send six cents for postage, and receive free, a costly box 
X IX. J. Z* XL • of goods which will help all, of either sex, 10 more money 
right away tuan any cuing else in this world. Fonuues await the workers absolute 1 ? 
■are. At once address Tbuk A Co., AuguBta, Maine. 



u 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Jan. 17, 1885. 



HAGS LETTER. 

Dear N. L.: We've had a real stavin 1 time last week, 'n no mistake. 
First for all was a just too lovely dinner on California street ; then Mrs. 
Rutherford's party an' the german on Friday, to say nothin' o' the op'ra 
in between. I tell you a girl's life is a awful jolly one. La me, you'd 
think 't the married folks was the sort 't had the gay time o' it, if you 
could a seen what Ned 'n me did to one o' the parties (I won't say which 
for shame sake) up in the upper hall. Ned says to me, if the Jud^e was 
here, he'd ask a riddle on that lady over there, so I reckon I'll answer it 
for him. " Why is she like one of Wilkie Collin's books?" "Lame, 
Ned," says I, "she ain't a bit bookish. Why, you'd imagine she was real 
young, the way 't she goes on." " Simply, Mag," says he, " 'cause she's 
a woman in white." " Good gracious! Anyhow, I think her husband's 
awful good-natured — he don't seem to mind it a single bit ; even down to 
Monterey, when the men 'd grab her in swimmin', he'd never say a word ; 
but really 'n truly she did flirt scand'lous the other night. 

Henry Redington made a reg'lar fool o' his self (Meta says 't nature 
did that fur him at an early period), tryin' to play sweet on coin. (Heory, 
my dear, you can't play P. Ashe in that quarter ; it's a diff'rent streak). 
It appers to me 't Sheldon's goin' in for the heiress again. He let up for 
a while, but la me! I tell you he's just rushin' things now. Ma says it 
made her real serious, the other night, to think how hard poor, dear old 
Winnie tries to keep in with the beaux. It must seem kind o' queer to 
hisself to be associatin' with Carey Friedlander. Jimmy Otis, Sammy 
Boardman, Al. Bowie, Robbie Coleman 'n the Casserly boys, 't he knew 
as infants. 

Widdahs is still to the fore. The wiunin' o' her suit has sent the Oak- 
land stock kitin'. The Judge asked ma the other night why a Nob Hill 
widdab o' wealth had showu a decided ability for the " Southern Planter " 
sort of bizoess? "'Cause she's goin' to New Orleans," says I. "No. 
child," says the Judge, " because she can raise Cotton to a firm basis, and 
that, too, from an Army plant." Another widdah's chosen a lawyer, 
whose well-known graceful walk carries out her name ; 'n still another, 
'ts been tourin' round the world is a goin' (they say) to buy a fat young 
husband. 

Ned says 't he heard on the street 'told man Tyler was just furious 
'cause Mag had associated Tom Bell 'n Althea in the hatchin' bizness, for 
he's 'bout to take a patent in that line hisself, a reg'lar big affair, where 
actor men can buy plots for new plays, 'n where the act o' writin' '11 be 
made a specialty, 'cause the old man goes in with Richelieu in the sayin' 
't " the pen is mightier than the sword." However, as Ned says, Riche- 
lieu come out at the small end o' the horn, 'n I reckon 't old man Tyler 
'11 find hisself a crawlin' that way, too. The Pacific Club is in a awful 
uneasy state, they say, at the idea, 'cause they feel 's if they was treadin' 
on a volcano — no knowin* what won't be sprung on 'em, singly or in lots 
at any minnit. No wonder 't the price o' sealskins has advanced so this 
Christmas, for the Judge told ma 't 'twas much 's a man's fortune was 
worth to refuse one now, or sol'taires, either. Bank clerkships is 'bout to 
be abandoned, 'cause young men are goin' to be employed as secretary's 
for capitalists. (I say, won't they find out a lot o* secrets) ! 

I'm awful glad 't the papers is goin' for the big scent bottles 't are car- 
ried nowadays, 'cause, don't you know, 't lots o' wimmeo carry 'em for 
private nips, 'n then they rub perfume on their lips to drown the smell 
o' the drink. It's comical what folks '11 do on a pinch. Ma Bays 't she 
once heard of a lady 't had a big hollow made in the handle of her para- 
sol, 'n she used to till it with brandy 'n suck it ! The say 't a certain so- 
ciety lady has actually got tight on New Year's Day, 'n then played it 
was hysterics on account o' the state o' the atmosphere. That's too thin, 
ain't it ? Somethin' like the little affair goin' over to Angel Island the 
other day, when a couple bein' detected in close quarters, the gentleman 
said he was tryin' to sooth the fears o' the fair creature, who was terrified 
at the rough waves ! (Twas a pity about her, wan't it)? 

The fat dentist is comin' out strong in the flowery line. (He always 
blossoms in platonics). I reckon Japanese plants is a good advertisement 
'mong the wealthy 'n the great. The miniature o' the big brother looks 
real cute when he gets his mustache all twisted. But la me ! you should 
a seen the girls daubin' molasses candy over the fellahs mustaches up to 
Van Ness Avenue the other night ! I was remarkin* to Ned 't 'twas use- 
ful to be on the bean-pole order o' beauty when goin' to a candy pullin', 
for|you should a seen the majestic hostess towerin 1 way up out o' reach o' 
sticky hands. 

All the girls is gi in 1 wild over a live edition o' Seidlitz Powders in the 
shape of a German Baron ('ts a dose, sure enough). I should think the 
experience o' the Clay-street fam'ly 't fell into anything but good hands in 
their unceasin' gaieties with the Baron 't skipped, 'd be a warnin' to all 
Baron worshipers, shouldn't you? 

Footsey Beasely is comin' back, they say, so the clique 't adores British- 
ers can pick up heart 'n prepare to receive him. Nellie told me 't she 
heard 't some o' the San Rafael girls sent a petition to old man Booker to 
send on a few Englishmen 't wasn't wanted in New York, so I reckon 
they '11 all come together. 

I don't blame the girls so much for wantin'new blood. Why, just look 
at the fellahs here. They don't care for any one 't hasn't got coin, 'n the 
boys 't swarm at the parties hasn't got an idea beyond mashin'. I hear 't 
one o 1 the numerous sisters o' California street is goin' to 'stablish a sort 
o' Kindergarten for the young men o' society, where they'll be taught all 
the little tricks 'n devices o' fashionable flirtation. Well, they'll have a 
experienced teacher, ma says, 'n I'm sure the girls ought to thank her for 
puttin' 'em through, 'cause, though they've got heaps o' sand, they don't 
know how to catch on worth a cent. 

Speakin' o' that, reminds me o' just the opp'site. It seems 't Bob 

is rather tiresome 'n hard to shake once he settles to a girl of an evenin'. 
So Bessie said, the other night, 't she'd tell him he ought to take a lesson 
from the notice boards on the road, 'n " let go " occasionally. 

I'm awful sorry 't the old chaps down to the Club are in such a funk, 
'cause Ned says they was gettin up a real spree for their lady friends, 'n 
was goin' to make it a masked ball, with the Tivoli orchestra to play all 
the op'ra music. But la me ! they dar'sent do it now, 'cause there's no 
knowin' who'd get in under the mask, 'n as Ned says : " Show me the 
man among 'em, down there, that 'd dare to refuse admittance to oysters 
on the half shell." (What on top o' this earth does he mean by that)? 
Anyhow, they've decided not to give it, 'n I call it real provokiu' 'cause 
I'm real fond o' old men. I just think Boyd, 'n Heatley 'n Mr. Hoge 



lovely. They say 't Reub Lloyd 's captured at last. I wonder if it's 
true? I wouldn't mind bein' her, for he's a awful nice fellab, (but don't 
tell him 't I said so). He's so killin' modest, though, 'n the notoriety 't 
Althea gave him most squelched him outright. You bet she was afraid 
to tackle him on the contract business. He knows too much law for old 
man Tyler's rjars to affect him. 

I heard a conundrum the other day 't was 'most worthy o' the Judge, 
'n when you think it was a little bit o* a twelve-year-old 't made it, you 
'd say it was real smart. She was askin' her sister " why" she took her 
tools along to the Lawn Tennis ground? "'Cause," says she, "you've 
got Arthur Page's escort, 'n I'm sure he's a reg'lar bat 'n no mistake. " 
Now, I call that real cute for a youthful mind, eh? But some minds 
take kind o' natural to riddlin' an' fiddlin', an' so forth. Look at the 
Judge, 'n look at Henry Heyman! Fiddlin's right popular, tn judge by 
the way 't flowers was lavished on Heyman to the Philharmonic Concert, 
'n the ladies 't pets him so socially was all out, even though 't was rainin' 
pitchforks (o' course, I don't really mean pitchforks, you know). Lots o' 
high-toned folks was there, 'n one old couple ('ts lately married) was look- 
in' so killin' stifh'sh I couldn't help thinkin' what a pity they got mar- 
ried, 'cause he was ever so much more 'tentive to her to the last year's 
concerts, when people used to talk about 'em bein' so much together. 
But what do you think o' the new idea o' sacred dinners, like the one 't 
was given to a clergyman 'n bis wife last week? It's the last agony to 
the East, 'n o' course folks here will follow the fashion, for, as Ma says, 
" what won't people do for novelty? 'n to this dinner all the music was 
hymns 'n so forth, sung by a paid church choir. The menu cards had lit- 
tle texts printed in between each course, an' they do say 't the march to 
the dinner room was to the tune o* "Onward, Christian Soldier." But, 
la me, it appears to me the Rev. srentleman 'd as lief have had a little o' 
the music o' every day performed when he is out a visitin'. There's been 
a real first-class sensation a hatchin' for some time, 'n it 's most ready to 
come out now, so you just look out for the first news of it from your lit- 
tle friend, Mag. 

The San Francisco Merchant, says the Riverside Press and Horti- 
culturist, notwithstanding its commercial name, Tlie Merchant, is one of 
the best horticultural papers in the State. Not an issue passes but it 
presents matter of the greatest interest to orchardists and vine-growers, 
and it many times takes the lead in such matters, distancing in enterprise 
the special horticultural publications. The fruit-growers of the State, no 
less than the merchants, ought to appreciate and patronize this publica- 
tion. We cannot avoid the belief that The Merchant has adopted a long- 
headed course, for the interests of the producer and the tradesman are 
inseparably joined, and what helps one helps the other. 



The British ship, Eton Hall, which arrived in this port on Monday, 
from Cardiff, reports very heavy weather on the passage. The cranes of 
the lower main and fore topsail yards were carried away in a gale of 
wind, and both yards came down on deck, causing considerable damage. 



In another column will be found a card from Geo. Marcus & Co., 
General Agents of the Trans-Atlantic Fire Insurance Company, of Ham- 
burg, explaining the position of that company toward the Pacific Insur- 
ance Union in the matter of rates. 

WILLIAM J. DINGEE, 

REAL ESTATE AUCTIONEER, 

460 iND 462 EIGHTH STREET, OAKLAND. 
J. O. ELDRIDGB AUCTIONEER 



The Palatial 

Residence ! Late Dr, Hugh J. Glenn, 

On Jackson and Lake Stre6ts, Oakland, 
.A.* Peremptory Auction. 

SATURDAY. 

SATURDAY, January 17th, 1885 at 3 o'clock P. 91., 

ON THE PREMISES, 

Lot 300x150, Mansion of 15 Charming Rooms, Numerous Bath- 
Rooms. Closets, etc., etc. 

Entire house finished in solid black walnut, with hand-carved and inlaid Mantels, 
Mirrors and Book Case. Costly imported Chandeliers; large, handsomely decorated 
Glass Dome Conservatory, filled with the Choicest Tropical Plants. Elegantly fres- 
coed Billiard-Room and Bowling- Alley, with Grates, Mantels, Mirrors, etc. Faultless 
Stable for six horses; Carriage and Harness Rooms, Closets, Servants' Rooms, Hay 
Loft and Granary. Grounds laid out and planted; Brooze Fountains, Statuary, 
Marble Walks, etc. SEWERAGE PERFECT. 

For Illustrated Catalogue and Permit to examine property apply to 

WILLIAM J. DINGEE, 460 and 462 Eighth street, Oakland, 
Or EASTON & ELDRIDGE, 22 Montgomery street, San Francisco. 

J. TOMKINSON'S LIVERY ANO SALE STABLE, 

Nog. 57, 59 and SI Minna street, 

Bet. First and Second, San Francisco. One Block from Palace Hotel. 
Also Carriages and Cabs at Pacific Club, No. 130 Post street; also Northeast Corner 
Montgomery and Bush streets. Vehicles of Every Description at Reduced Rates. 
TELEPHONE No. 15S. July 20. 

MISS M. B. BBLANGER, 

Dressmaking Parlors and Pattern Rooms, 

Central Block— Entrance 14 Dupont Street, San Francisco. 



Jul 17, 1885 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



10 



CRADLE, ALTAR AND TOMB. 

CRADLE. 

Abhahk - In thi» .il> . J.tn 7, to the » He of N Annual, a son- 

BKovnrfoai in tiua cUy, Ju ■•! Ihm Bfowutoae,! 

Iuko int'i- oUwwtfaol A. Beru, > daughter. 

Hi lt*a\ In " i II. liuUrnui. | HMI. 

10, to the wild ol ; I .» daughter. 

Ow KTiBR- In tin- .1'. v . Jul 9, t" lbs wife Ol It. J. Courtier, a boii. 
DtATU I Ol P. A. Davis,* BOD. 

■■All In this oKti J«u. 10, to ibo «rlf< of J. H K mi, a boii. 

land, Jan 10, t" Um wife of Obarioi Btbu h. a son. 
J in, *, t«> the wife "f Patrick Furlong 1 , ■ ion. 
liAnnr.Lt' -In SauU Barbara, Due. SO, (•• Iba wtfo of II. L Uarfleld, a son. 
QmiBKHAo-In ttiis city, Jan. 18* to the wife ol W. It. iireunberir, a daughter, 
lb . v-. Ii> tins dty, Jan, »;, !■• the wife ol M. Hono, a sou. 
Boutin In thUolty, .Un. li. to tbe artfa ol t. s EughWi a daughter. 
toe wins ol Denn I. Jacobs, a son. 
■if e of Alfreds. Keser, a son. 
Kkllv — In thi- itiMwtfool P. J. Kelly, a> daughter. 

Lyskk lii this i-itv. Jan. 1*. to tin.- wife of Jacub Lysor, a daughter. 
McLal'OULUt— In toll city, Jan. 11, to the wife -if J, F. .McLaughlin, a daughter. 
MoCaktuy— In this city, Jan, ■■>. to the wife of J. it UeQarthy, i daughter. 
Maktin — In this city, Jan 14, to tbe wife of a. II. Martin, a daughter. 
Makmiall In this city, Jan 4, to the wife of Junes U. Marshall, a daughter. 
-In tola city, Jan. 11, to the wife ol l. K. Morgan, a daughter. 
. this dty, Jan. — , to the wife of Phil. 11 .Moise, a daughter. 
Nokioias -In thin city, Jan.. 13, to the wife of Joseph Nurd man, a son. 
i In this dty, Jan '.», to the wins of Blnoon Peters, a son. 

EUykolw— In this city, Jan. 10, to tbe wife ol David L Eteyno d-*, a daughter. 
Baufb— In this city, Jan. 9, t.> the wifeof D. J. Rampe, a daughter. 
R sin — lii this city, -I. ux IS, to the wi'e of Adrim bobin. a daughter. 
Smith - In this ■ ■■ the wife of George W Smith, a daughter. 

BCHNOKB— fa this city, J»n. '.i, IO the wife of Th. Sehmko, a daughter. 

i in — In this city, Jan. — , to the wife of J. Silverstein, of Bed Bluff, a son. 
&AJHOIUI 8— In this city. Jan 8, to the wife of Qeorge Sartorios, a daughter. 

BOWBKT- In this eitv, Jan. 11. In the Wild of Ch&lles iilewert, a son. 

s.ni.fKi in thla diy, Jan, 7. to th* wife of J H. Schleef, a daughter, 

-In this city, Jan. 18, to the wife of J J. Vuseoneellos, adaughter. 
WOLLKBft — In Fresno, Jan. 11, to the wife of Sol. Wullner, a son. 

ALTAR. 

Collis*-Pikf.— Ian. 7. William D. Collins to Ella L. Pike, both of this city. 
Cohhiko-Masouxuttb— Jan. 10, Etohert Cunning to Blanche L. Masounette. 

l.)i>K-.Mir< iim.l- Jan. 18, Charles W. Lioe tO Laura F. Mitchell, both of this city. 

lioASK-CimHTii -Jan. ti, John II. Doane to Ella M. Grittith, both of this city. 

Fkank-CoIIN— Jan. 14, Abrani Frank to Mrs. Mary Conn, 

GonatU-AKO >NH*I -Jan. (J, Eugene QodeaU to Benita Angonnet. 

Ha uawAY-HooK— Jan. 1 1 , Andrew H. Hathway to Mrs. Caliata W. Hook. 

BaTt-FliORKNTlXK— Jan. 10, A. G. Heyl to Lizzie II. Florentine. 

Bolmdav Quran Nov. 16", Alfred M. Holliday to Violet G. Quieh. 

HiiK' k-Wisk- Jan. 7, ilenrj Hiekck to Miss Eliza L. Wise. 

IIan' "CK-Franks -Dee. 3, Charles T. Hancock to Pauline Franks. 

KKLLKR-r rkv — Jan. 14, Joseph Keller to Emma Marie Frey, both of this city. 

-P pi'BR- J n. 13, Edward Greenwood Kendall to Emma Popper. 
Lami'k-Hukmas.v- Jan. 11, George Lampe tu Mary Hermann, both of this city. 
Lt'.vv-FKA\KKi.L— Jan. 11, Max Levy to Sarah Frankell. both of this city. 
I,i cnsufOSR-UPRBCirr— Jan. 8, s. Luchsiogerto Regula Opreeht, both of this city. 
LakR*VAU-Mattpbld— Jan. 11, John Lankenau to Sophia Mattfeld, both of this dty. 
Mct'eRUfcK-1) -LAN— Jan. 13, James A. McCoriniek to Jennie Dolan, both of this city. 
dTi whii.L-BLsH — Jan. 8. Louis I. G. Newbell to Esther Bush. 
Bobb-Faroo — Jan. 14, L. J. Hose, Jr., to Fannie J. Fargo. 
BarDRRB-BithillBR— Jan. 8, Henry Sanders to Annie Burailler. 
Stk.w art-Uoolas— Jan. 11, John Stewart to Margaret Doolan. 
SOUBIBLI-SPILLARD -Jan. 3, James teheibli to Nellie Spill ard. 
Wklsii-Carroll— Jan. 14, John Welsh to Sarah Carroll. 

TOMB. 

Arkamamsex— Jan. 10, John Abrahamsen, aged 31 years, 2 months and 25 days. 

Barrv- Jan. 15, Minnie Barry, a native of San Francisco, aged 22 years and 10 mos. 

Bl ii kk -Jan. 11, Lizzie J. Burke, a native of Maine, aged 24yrs., 4 mos. and 2 days. 

BR01 I'm i,— Jan. 12, iknui Broemmel, aged 34 years, 10 months and 23 days. 

BtKRsciiw'ALE - Jan 11, Fredcneka, wife of Carl Bierachwale, aged 76 years. 

Carl* n -Jan 11, Carl Frederick Carlson, a native of Sweden, aged 42 yra., 3 mos. 

CbocRBR— Jan, 0, G. W. Crocker, aged 28 years 

l> nmstos— Jan. 13, Isaac Denniaton, formerly of Newark, N. J., aged 91 years. 

Daly -Jan. 11, James Daly, a native of County Clare, Ireland, aged 02 years. 

Evans— Jan. 9. Anna E ans, a native of Canada, aged 59 years 

FixzoER^LD-Jaii i2, Frauk Fitzgerald, a native of Boston, Mass., aged .7 years. 

GSRHAIN Jan. 12. Henry Germain, aged 74 years. 

G roil -Jan. 6, Hie net S. Gough, aged 10 years, 10 months and 27 days 

Uoyt— Jan. 10, Henry C. Hoyt, a native of N. Y., aged JS years and I month. 

Haves -Jan. 'J, Ro iert Ha es, aged (i'l years. 

James— Jan. 10, Eli '.abcth James, aged 35 years, 1 month and 20 days. 

Jounson -Jan. 10, Rosa Agnes Johnson, aged 7 years and 2S days. 

Kksek— Jm. 10, son of Alfred and Emma Keser. 

HaRCVSSRN— Jan. 18, Frederick Marcussen. 

Miitruv— Jan. 13, Mary A. Murphy, aged 3 years and 10 days. 

Mead— Jan. 13, Elizabeth Mead, a native of New York, aged 66 years. 

MURriiv— Jan. 8, James H. Murphy, a native of Ireland, aged 3 i years. 

MlKk zir — Jan. 12, John McKenzie, aged — years. 

McKe^zib- Jan. 13, Donald McKensie. 

McMvrray - Jan. 10, Olivia C. MeMurray, a native of New Hampshire. 

MoTT-Jan. 8, Julius H. Mott, aired— years. 

Nolan— Jan. 7, William P. Nolan, a native of New York agei 49 yra. and 11 mos. 

Nohin — Jan. 15, John F. Norin, a native of Sweden, aged 27 years and 10 months. 

O'Mkara— Jan. 18, .Michael W. O'Meara, aged 16 years, 8 mouths and 13 days. 

Ruddock— Jan 14, Andrew Ruddock, a native of Ireland, aired 60 years. 

RointRACiiER-Jan. 9, Anna Bohrbacher, aged 18 years, 1 month aud 7 days. 

RiEOKLiiiTH— Jan. 9, Emma, Reigelhuth, a native of San Francisco, aged 3 ys., 24 ds. 

^oTT-Jan. 14, Rev. W. A. S:ott, D. D., LI, U., a native of Tenuessee, aged 72 yrs. 

Smith- Jan, 14, Mabel R. Smith, aged 10 years. 3 months aud 1 days. 

Stein - Jan 12, Hermann Augu-t Stein, aged 28 years, 1 month and 28 days. 

Taobsiq — Jan. 13, Bertha Taussig, aged 21 years. 

W'n.n— January 11, Mrs. Julia Winn, aired 62 years. 

Weil— Jan 13, Robert, son of Henry L. and Helena Weil, aged 7 years. 

Mr. H. B. Fasmore, assisted by Mrs. Carmichael-Caxr, Mr. Emile 
Knell Rod Miss B. Marchall, will give an invitation " Song Recital " on 
next Wednesday evening, at Irving Hall. Among other interesting num- 
bers on the programme are "Honor and Arms," the famous and Jifficult 
aria by Handel; selections from "A Poet's Love," by R. Schumann, and 
a number of original songs. 

The perpetual motion problem has cost §50,000,000, and a small boy 

at church still remains tbe nearest approach to a solution. — Puck. 



SEMI-ANNUAL STATEMENT 

The Nevada Bank of San Francisco, 



January 1, 1885. 

ASSETS. 

Hank Premises $400,000 00 

Other Real Estate 42,096 57 

$142,905 67 

I'm tid Statt'H Itnndet $500,000 00 

Miscellaneous Bonds lld.lsl 20 

61R.-IM JO 

Loans on Bonos and other Securities, Grain, etc. 88,121,081 BI 

Loans on Personal Security 4,759,155 58 

12,881.087 44 

Due from Banks and Bankers 4,0(15,141 03 

Sundry AOQOtWtB, Premium <m Bonds, Kxehange, etc 170,797 7fl 

Cash on hand B08 ( 649 08 

gl fl.070. 152 OS 

LIABILITIES. 

Capital Paid In $■*, 000,000 00 

Reserve Fund 8,000,000 00 

SO.OOO.OOO 00 

Due Depositors, Banks and Bankers 18,670,921 65 

Undivided Profits ' r 2,'951 NS 

Other Liabilities 16.270 37 

110,870, 152 08 

Statr ok California, County ok San Francisco, ks.— GEO. L. BRANDKK Vice- 
President, and J. S. ANGUS, Cashier uf THE \KVADA BANK OF SAN FRAN- 
CISCO, being each and severally duly sworn, each for himself depOBes and nays that 
the foregoing statement is true to the best of his knowledge and belief. 

(Signed), GEO. L. BRANDEK. Vice-President 

(Signed), J. S. ANGUS, Cashier. 

Subscribed and sworn to before me this 10th day of January, 1885. 
[Skal.] (Signed), J. H. BLOOD, Notary Public. 

CARD TO THE PUBLIC ! 

The Pacific Insurance Union Is tbe litlo of an organization, 
or "compact" (so called), of all the Foreign, Eastern and Local Fiie Insurance 
Companies represented in the State of California, with the exception of three Com- 
panies -two Eastern and one Foreign. This Association has been but recently 
formed— its object being, in the main, to sustain and foster fixed and arbitrary rates 
of Fire Insurance Premiums (or, as defined by Article 2 of its Constitution: "The 
Regulation ol the Business of Fire Insurance"), with the ungenerous and avowed 
determination, however, to stamp out, if practicable, any and all Fire Insurance 
Companies assuming to act independent of its Constitution and By-Laws. 

THE TRANSATLANTIC 

Fire Insurance Company of Hamburg, Germany, 

Is Not a Member of tbe "Pacific Insurance Union," 

Or in league with any Board or Association of Fire Insurance Companies whatever, 
but will continue, as it always has done, to pursue an independent, prompt and con- 
servative couise in all its dealings with the Insuring public, and to issue its policies 
at such ratPs of premium as may be mutually agreed upon and commensurate with 
the hazard, and, when advisable, allowing liberal rebates or commissions. The 
patronage of the Insuring public is therefore respectfully solicited for the TRANS- 
ATLANTIC FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY, which is an unquestionably reliable 
institution, and has been established for many years very successfully on this Coast- 
It has a capital of §1,500,000, a large part of which is invested in the United States, 
and holds reinsurance contracts with eleven other well and favorably known Euro- 
pean Fire Insurance Companies. 

GEO. MARCUS & CO., 

GENERAL AGENTS 

Transatlantic Fire Insurance Company of Hamburg, 

232 CALIFORNIA STREET. 

San Francisco, January, 1885. 




Tlie IO e s t 



PUKE NATURAL 

Mineral 

Water! 



INDORSED BY THE MEDICAL PROFESSION. 
FOR SALE EVERYWHERE. DEPOT, 513 SACRAMENTO ST. 

A FUNERAL SUIT; ALSO FUtt DRESS-SUITS 

For Special Occasions, can be had at 

J. COOPER'S TAILORING ESTABLISHMENT, 

24 New Montgomery Street. 

Palace Hotel, Just Below the Bridge. 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Jar. 17, 16f5 



PASSING RE MARKS. 

There was an important change in the second performance of 

Traviata, by the Abbott troupe. Our Emma's twenty thousand dollar 

diamond had a new setting. 

***** 

A lady friend, living in Oakland, has a Chinaman, as cook, whose 
mind has been developed far above his station. He has evidently 
studied the philosophy of his race. Angry at sume dereliction on his 
part, bis mistress flew from the dinner table to the kitchen and com- 
menced to scold him. He looked at her, and with dignity remarked : 
" Confucius teaches us that it is wrong to speak with your mouth full." 

The Hugues trial, in Paris, bas brought up, as a matter of comment, 
the peculiarities of French criminal procedure. The presiding Judge 
submits the accused to a severe interrogatory, in which his leanings to- 
ward the prosecution are unmistakable. It must be remembered that to 
French law the prisoner is guilty until proven innocent. His indict- 
ment is not a mere statement of allegations, as with us, but a carefully 
constructed story of the crime, written in delightful novel form, based 
upon the actual facts ascertiined from witnesses, and developed by a 
combination of world knowledge and vividness of imagination. It is 
the equivalent to what would be, in our courts, a prima facia case. 
The onus is then on the accused. To the French the severity and evi- 
dent bias of the Judge is the surest test of the truth of the defense. Some 
of the interrogatories are, to an American, very ludicrous. I have at- 
tended many a case in Paris, and in one of them I heard the following 
conversation between Judge and prisoner : 

JUDGE — " Prisoner, why did you, on the evening of the 17th of last 
May, between the hours of seven and eight, leave your room ? It was 
not " 

Prisoner—" But, Judge, I did not " 

Judge — "Do not interrupt me. It was not your usual custom to 

do BO." 

Prisoner — "But, Judge " , 

Judge—" Silence, sir ; answer my question. Why did you, at the time 
and on the date before stated, leave your room ? " 

Prisoner — " I did not leave it, Judge ; I could not. I " 

Judge — "You did not leave it? It is in evidence. Several wit- 
nesses, persons of undoubted honor and veracity, have so testified. It is 
useless to deny it." 

Prisoner — "But, Judge, I assure you— I swear that I did not leave 
my room. I couldn't have done so. I did not enter my room at all that 
evening." 

Judge—" What's that ? Did not enter your room at all. Such moral 
perversity is incredible." 

Prisoner — " I am speaking the truth, I am sure, Judge. The wit- 
nes^e- may have seen me on the street, but I had not been to my room. 
I will explain " 

Judge — " This is preposterous. Your habits for a long time past have 
been the subject of minute inquiry. It was your daily custom to return 
to your room at half-past six, and you were never known to leave it be- 
fore nine. On the evening in question you lefc it between seven and 
eight. This fact being ascertained, formed the tirst link in the chain of 
evidence with which the able officers of justice have bound you. I now 
ask you to tell me your motive in leaving your room at the time elated ? " 

Prisoner — " I swear by all that is holy that I did not enter my room 
that evening, did n -t leave it, did not " 

Judge (with an intensity of sternness) — "Enough, prisoner. Your 
mendacity is frightful. I advise you to abandon such a system of pre- 
varicaiion; it will not help you before this Court." 

And so on. The poor devil was probably speaking the truth! 
***** 

I have heard of an old lady who thought Heaven was a place where she 
would sit in a rocking-chair, driuk tea and gossip. There are probably 
more like her. I'd like to know how many men imagine Heaven to be a 
magnificent bar-room with unending drinks before them. To many a 
man an earthly bar-ronm is the superlative of bliss. 

Some people seem born to kick. I met an acquaintance yesterday, 
who began railing at a mutual friend, and his strong words induced me 
to say: " I thought that you w.-re under obligations to him." "Bosh! 
He did me one favor, I admit, but he refused me a second one. Conse- 
quently, we are even." The world wags that way. 

***** 

" I pay you every week or every month ?" asked one of our richest nobs 
of a newly engaged Chinese cook. " Evely week, and light up to time, 
too. You sabe?"' He was discharged on the spot. 

■»**-** 

There is a certain habit of American actors which can not be explained 
on either physiological or psychological grounds. I refer to the extreme 
readiness and voracity with which they swallow all sorts of foreign plays, 
contrasted with their extreme reluctance in regard to works of domestic 
origin. When an American play is presented to an American actor, his 
stomach becomes dainty at once, and he fastidiously cavils at every point 
of the compass against undertaking the new part. An actress makes no 
objection to the sickly, reformed prostitute, Camille ; the mock 
sentimentalist, Mrs. Haller ; or the old h ig, Meg Merriles ; but, should 
an American playwright offer to her any of these, or any original phase 
of mimic life, she would turn her back flat upon them. Actor? seem to 
be willing to strain the last muscle to adapt themselves to a foreign play 
and its peculiarities, while they will not lift a finger to conform to the 
reasonable demands of a play written by an American. Why is this? 

L'l-MUBEAU. 

One of Richards, Harrison & Sherwood's Automatic Tea Firers 
is now as indispensable a part of the equipment of a grocery store as a 
pair of scales. This useful invention enables every retailer, by purchas- 
ing his Tea raw and toasting it himself, to supply bis patrons with a fresh, 
aromatic article, which will delight all consumers. Grocers, who wish to 
keep up with the times, should buy one. 

R. Cutlar (Dentist), Room 104, Phelan's Building, tbird floor. 



KI-YI, KI-YI.—A Parody. 

The light of dawn was rising fast, 
When through a city alley passed 
A dog, who bore on end of tail 
A tied tin can, and loud did wail 

Ki yi, Ki-yil 
He op'ed his jaws ; be raised his head ; 
And at two-forty pace he sped ; 
While like a Chinese riddle rung 
The accents of that unknown tongue, 

Kiyi, Ki yi! 
Before him lay the duBty street ; 
Behind, the boys with footsteps fleet 
Gave chase, while swifter yet he ran, 
And yelped to music of the can, 

Ki-yi, Ki-yi! 
The butcher tried to clutch his leg, 
"O stop, my friend, pray stop I beg," 
But swifter grew the doggie's feet 
To escape a grave of sausage meat. 

Ki-yi, Ki-yi! 
" stop the dog ! " fair ladies cry, 
But wilder, fiercer grows his eye ; 
For sounds the can with fearful din, 
Like fifty devils after him — 

Ki-yi, Ki-yi! 
At last he fell upon the ground ; 
His cancurred heart true rest had found ; 
He freely now could wag his tail ; 
No more would rise that anguished wail ; 

Ki-yi, Ki-yi! 
There, in the twilight dim and gray, 
Lifeless, yet beautiful he lay ; 
While Silence drew her mantle 'round, 
And hushed between bis lips that sound, 

Ki-yi, Ki-yi! 
— C. C. in the Laurel Hall Outlook. 



Take the Haight-street or McAllister-street cable cars to Park with- 
out transfer. 




GEO. STREET, Agent Ifews Letter, 30 Cornhill, E. C, London. 

TlEB I gTcO MP AN Y'sT 

EXTRACT 

OF MEAT. 

Aij ii rial Rale, 

w, ooo. ooo Jars. 

Finest and Cheapest 
Meat- Flavoring Stork 
for Soups, Made Disfies 
and Sauces. 

CAUTION.— Genuine ONLY with the fac simile of BARON LIEBIG'S Signature in 
Blue Ink acro-s Label. The title " BARON LIEBIG " and his photograph having 
been lately largely used by dealers having no connection with BARON LIEBIG, the 
public are" hereby informed that the LIEBIG COMPANY are the only manufacturers 
who are able to offer the article with BARON LIEBIG'S guarantee of genuineness. 

An invaluable and palatable tonic iu all cases of weak digestion and debility. 

" Is a success and a boon for which Nations should feel grateful." — See Medica' 
Press, Lancet, British Medical Journal, etc. 

To be had of all Storekeepers, Grocers and Chemists. Sole Agents for the United 
States (wholesale only), C. DAVID & CO., 9 Fenchurch Avenue, London, England. 

Sold Wholesale by RICHARDS & HARRISON, San Francisco. 

THOMAS PRICE'S 

Assay Office and Chemical Laboratory, 

524 Sacramento Street, San Francisco. 

Careful Analyses made of Ores, Metals, Soils, Waters, Industrial Products, Foods, 
Medicines and Poisons. 
Consultations on Chemical, Mining and Metallurgical Questions. 

CSAJtOES. 

ANALYSES. 
Qualitative Analysis of Ores.$10 to $25 00 
Quantitative " " 1ft to 50 00 

Qualitative Analysis of Water 2ft 00 

" .... 75 00 

Guano 25 00 

Proximate Analysis of Coal 10 0J 

Quantitave " " 50 00 

Complete Analysis, Qualitative and 
Quantitative," of Complex Sub- 
stances, at Special Rates. 



ASSAYS 

Gold and Silver ' $3 00 

Gold, Silver and Lead 5 00 

Gold, Sliver and Copper 5 00 

Copper 3 OOJQuantitative 

Iron 3 00 

Tin 5 00 

Quicksilver 5 00 

Manganese 5 00 

Chromium 5 00 



A CARD. 

To Merchants, Storekeepers, Captains, etc. 

ISIDOR BRAUN, 

Broker in Pearls and Precious Stones, 

4,4, HATTON GARDEN, LONDON, 

ENGLAND. 

^g- Consignment* of PEARLS and PRECIOUS 

SJOyES will receive my BEST ATTENTION, and 

ACCOUNT SALES, with PROCEEDS, promptly 

remitted. May 3. 

L. LANSZWEERT, 

Analytical and Consulting Chemist, 360 Fourth street, 
San Francisco. July 1 



.Ian. 17, 1885. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISKR. 



ID 



NOTABILIA. 



Grandpapa (trying t" ba iovm*) "Now, nCftbal, tall in« why you 
didn't pal thai quarter I gmva yoa Into tho plate at oharofa thli morning. 
I lik<- to km a little cirl (rive odm rfuily. and Dot " let herrljcht band know 
what her left hami ' I irrigibla Gruddanghtor (who ti laving 

the mosey for oandy] ■-"Tii..tV jost the trouble, grandpa. My tit: lit 
bau<l thought my left was patting it In, and my left hand thought my 
right was, and n between the two of them it didn't get put in 
at nil." —Life. 

"Johnnie, I'm going to turn over a new leaf with you," exclaimed bia 
mother, at she started for the heir of the Jarphlyi with a slipper and an 
air of injury. " Let it be ■ teal of abaenoe, ma," cried Jonnnle, aa he 
made hit way over the wood pile, and went off and told his chum that 
P, J, Uaasfn A <'■>., oornerol Washington and Battery streets, are still 
pure and uuadulterited liquors, in retail quantities, at wholesale 
prices, 

" What are you taking my booU out of here for ? " asked a gentleman 
of bii negro servant. What, is dose yer boots, boss?" "You know 
they are. yon trifling rascal. What are you going to do to them ? " "Wal, 
1 'dare, for goodness, boss," dropping the boots. " 1 thought da was de 
iknttles, an' I thooght I'd go down arter some coal, sah. Cuis how *er 
man can be 'ceived. — Ark. Trav. 

A California girl left her clothing in an open boat and hid herself, 
and when her parents were crying ana saying if they only had her back 
they would obey her slightest wish, she appeared and said Bhe wanted to 
marry George, and be taken to Swain's Bakery, No. 213 Sutter street, 
Ban Francisco, where delicious lunches, ice-creams, pastries, confections, 
hi always be obtained. That girl's head was level. 

"I ae© you're in mournin' this eveniu', Mrs. Groaty," said our buy 
1 tennis, as he made a New Year's call. ' Mr. Groaty is dead, Dennis," 
said the old lady, as she dropped a tear in the punch bowl. "Dead, is 
it. '! " sadly exclaimed Dennis. " May there be as many swallows a sink- 
ing over his grave as I'll take for his memory this day." 

" Did you pass the hat ? " the pastor of a Texas congregation asked his 
deacon ;.fter the morning service. *' Yea, I did," said the Deacon, and 
then, looking into the vacant interior of a hat that antied nothing but 
lining, he added gloomily, " So did everybody else." — Burdette. 

It Is said that one of our rural debating societies recently debated the 
following question: "From which do chickens suffer the most, ministers 
orowls?" After a spirited discus>ion it was decided that chickens Buffer 
most from ministers. A resolution was also adopted, averring that Brad 
ley ft Kulofson, corner of Geary and Dupont streets, S. F., are the lead- 
ing photographers on the Pacific Coast. 

" Sis," said a bright-eyed Austin youth to his sister, who was putting 
the finishing touches on her toilet, "you ought to marry a burglar." 
" What do you mean by such nonsense. " I mean that you and a burglar 
would get along very well together — you have got the false locks and he 
has got the false keys. —Texas Sift. 

"He died on the field," she sobbed, as she stood at his tombstone. "A 
gallant soldier, no doubt," broke in a sympathizer. " Oh no, sir, he was 
hit by a baseball bat." And then the sympathizer meandered off down 
the lane, singing that the Imperishable Paint, sold by J. 11. Kelly & Co., 
Market street, goes three times as far as other paints, and is impervious 
to sun or rain. 

"What in the world are yon staring at that young married couple so 
intently for?" asked one young lady of another, in arailroad train. "Oh, 
exclaimed her companion, with a start and a sigh. " It's so natural for 
us girls to contemplate matrimony, you know." — Bur. Free Press. 

An old poker player remarked, the other day, as he was rising from 
the table, after a session lasting three days and nights: " I'll be eternally 
honswaggled if I can tell whether this is yesterday, to-day, to-morrow, 
day before tomorrow or day after yesterday, but I'm quite sure that those 
stylish hats sold by White, No. G14 Commercial street, have no superior." 

" Lend me your ear a minute," remarked Mrs. Brown to her husband, 
the other evening. "Will you give it back tome?" he inquired, with 
muck anxiety. "Of course I will, you idiot. Do pou suppose I want to 
start a tannery ? " She got the ear. — N. Y. Graphic. 

Somebody, in describing a beautiful lady, said she had " a face that a 
painter might dwell upon." Rather a broad face that. — Norr. Berald. 

Ayer's Hair Vigor improves the beauty of the hair and promotes its 
growth. It imparts an attractive appearance, a delightful and lasting 
perfume. While it stimulates the roots, cleanses the scalp and adds ele- 
gance to luxuriance, its effects are enduring ; and thus it proves itself to 
be the best and cheapest article for toilet use. 

"Were those clothes made for you, Jenkinson?" inquired Brown, 
looking knowingly at the tell-tale seam down the front of the pantaloon 
legs. " What do you suppose?" was the reply. " Did you think I was 
made for the clothes V " — Bos. Trans. 

Ayer's Sarsaparilla is the most potent blood purifier, and a fountain 
of health and strength. Be wise in time. All baneful infections are 
promptly removed by this unequaled alterative. 

A German loves to contemplate himself, a Frenchman to talk about 
himself, an Englishman to blow about himself, an Italian to mourn about 
himself, an Irishman to swear about himself, and a Yankee to outlie them 
all. —Pitts. Tel. 

A man need not necessarily be possessed of musical ability to strike a 
liar. Bloom. Eye. 

J, F. Cutter's Old Bourbon. — This celebrated Whisky is for sale by 
all first-class druggists and grocers. Trade mark— star within a shield. 

This idea of saving up money for a rainy day is the rankest kind of 
nonsense. What does a man want money for on a rainy day? To sit by 
the fire and smoke is rainy-day fun enough. 

Best Pictures taken at the Imperial Gallery, 724J Market St., S. F. 



REAL ESTATE TRANSACTIONS. 

Bacorded la the Olty and County of San FranoUco, California, for 
the Wsek ending- January 13. 1886. 

c'< mpiUI fromlht Btcordtqfttu Uvmmercial Ayeiicj/, +U1 UaHftrrria Si. , H. t. 



Wednesday, January 7th 



GRANTOR AND (lltANTKE. 


D180BXR10IC. 


PHIC'K 


W Sairuel Bt al to R White 


Nw Octavla and Olive ftveune l o so x 


(i.ooo 


W E Orton to P Vraug 


Pnrl lol (i, hit 8, being on West End 

Map No 1 






200 




Sw Qreenwlcb end Baker, t '/J.',, n lo 
I.yon, nc 875:6, e <u buylmiintf, bolnn 
In W A Mil 

w Alabama, mi a i'tnl, ii'juxiuo.helng- 




Masonic Sav & Ln Bk to C Hogan 


."..'.Ml 

ii;u 


]' Bartolaol to J 8 Poru j oue 


S» lliirriKini and SStb, ii 22:6x112:6, lie- 
in- iii m ii m. 

E Fo1«uro 60 b 2611], » 26x112:6, bclnp 
E Koljoro, 25 e 25tU, ■ 25x119:6, being 


900 




1,000 




1,000 



Thursday, January 8th 



B Bascon to E Thicle 

P L A Pioche lo M Hoefler. , 



J F Alex to E Wheeler^., 
G W llinkle toPSelder 

JC Bales to J Eva 

Same to N Davidson ... 



T J Hiiyucs to BBaacon s Clay. SS0 w Deviaudero, w 27:6zlST:B 

— W A 499 

Undivided one-fourth Same 

97 acres, San Miguel Ranch, II A 111, 

178,58,62, part block 183,169 and 

240, etc 

S McAllister, 112:6 e Fillmore, c 25x100 

W A 302 

E Webster, 24:6 s PoBt, s 21x89:6, being 

In W A276 

E Pennsylvania avenue, 100 n Bulte, 

n 50x100 -P B 317 

E Pennsylvania avenue, 150 n Butte, n 

50x100 -P B317. 



f 1,100 

1 .100 



40,000 

2,375 

5,200 

50 

60 



Friday. January 9th. 



Sally Hill toT A Lord 

A Downey to T Kennedy 

R J Mercer toLGottig 

D O'Connor to Maggie O'Connor. 
F Burga et al to L Lask 



H C Dorrance to A W Clayea.. 



E E Meyer to J Plondke 

R J Trumbull to City & Co., 
G M Deucher to J Thode.... 



B Hollingsworth to D Hollingew'h 



LotB 75. 77, 79 and c one-half lot 73, 
Gift Map No 3 $1,300 

Ne Pacific and Hyde, e 20x60:6, being 

in 50-varal287 5 

W Hampshire, 100 a 24tb, B 25x100, be- 
ing in M B 17ti 

Lot 9, block 21, Market street Home- 
utead 

S Pine, 62:6 e Hyde, c 50xb7:6, being 
in 50-vara 1274 ; e uhject to a mort- 
gage lor $6,000. 

Lot 8, blk83, being in University Home- 
stead Assu Gift 

Lola 22 and 23-Mcyer'a Garden 482 

Street* t etc: 1 

Nw corner 50-vara lot 293, 8 71:6 x e 30' 

-50-vara 293 I 1,766 

Undivided one-half pection 36, Town- 
3,SR6w,etc I 500 



Saturday, January 10th. 



L Breslauer lo Robert Hess.... 
P B Cornwall to J M Nolan..., 



J M Nolan to C J Tayac . 



Milo Hoadley to D F McGraw ... 
Mary E Lowe to E M Wheeler ... 

L P Drcxler to V Ravonna ct al.. 
M Lehrman to A Nathan 



Lottie R Mors to City & Co of S F 
R A Rea to Margt PaterBon 



N Pacific, 67:6 w Saneome, w 80x0:89 - 
50-vara 1209 

S Golden Gate avenue, 40 w Wehsier. 
w :t]:6x87:6, being in Western Addi- 
tion 303 

S Golden Gate avenue, 40 w Webster, 
w 31:6x87:6, being in Western Addi- 
tion 303 

N Bush, 76 e Lyon, e 26x100, being in 
W A 682 

W Rondel Place, 248 s 16th, s 32:4, w 
49:6, a 30:4, w 17:6, n 12, c 64 to be- 
<riunh)g-M B 40 

N Vallejo, 89 w Stockton, w 48:6x70, 
50-vara 525 

N Sutter, 47:5 e Lyon, o 22xi07, being 
in W A. 583 

Streets, etc 

W 8th avenue, 2 0s Clement, s 25x120 
-OL189 



$4,800 

50 

6,500 
1,101 

1.700 

6.500 

1 
1 

5 



Monday, January 12th. 



G W Uinkel to Rosalia Wolf., 
Same to Dora Stecler 



M CBorchers et al to W Brown.. . 
Barbara Burke to G T Knopp et al 



R Boylan to M Goodwin. 



E Webster, 68:6 8 PoBt. 8*23x89:6. beinir 
in W A 276 

E Webster. 45:6 e Pobi, b23x89:6, being 
in W A 276 

S Rincon Place. 55:7 w Main, w 22:6x70 

Ne Jones and Filbert, c 41x120, being 
",n W A 44," 



.. W Auburn, 103 s Pacific, a 23x57:6, be- 

ine in 50-vara 623 

T Darcey to J A Spanldiog E Hardy. 168 n 17th, n 22:6x60, being 

I in M B 95 



$6,400 
5,500 



Tuesday, January 13th. 



Eraelia Thompson to H H Wood.. 

Z W Dodge to E P Overton 

T Tschantz to Fredk Tschantz. . . . 
Eliza R Buckler to C S Preble et al 

G Edwards lo Eliza A Damon 

R T Van Norden to W Bradford. . . 
VT P Buckingham to M B Levy... 
T J Bass to Mary Talbot 



Nw Frederick and Masonic avenue, n 
100x187:3 

N Geary, 232:1 e Laguna, e 25:10x120, 
W A201 

S Golden Gate avenue, 103:6 w Bu- 
chanan, w 27:8x187:8— ff A 282 

Se Page and Broderick, e 137:6x137:6— 
W A518 

E Shot well, 195 a 20th, b 2ox100, being 
in M B56 

S Washington, 137:6 e Locust, e 68:9 x 
127:8 -W A 819 

N Guury, 109 e Van Nest* avenue, e 55 
x 120— W A 59 

N Haight, 136:6 w Ucvisadero, w 55 x 
137:6 -W A 513 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND^ 



Jan. 17, 18S5 



The Oakland Postoffice, 



How Its Present Management is 
Regarded. 



AN EFFICIENT SERVICE INDORSED 
BY THE PUBLIC. 



The following correspondence explains stself: 

Mayor's Office, I 

City of Oakland, Cal., Jan. 14, iksd. ) 

W E. DARGIE, Esq., Postmaster, Oak^ 
und Cal -Mi, Dear Sir: It affords me great 
Ble«ure to transmit to you the accompanying 
document, expressions of the sentiments of this 
com "unity concerning yourself, your adminis- 
tration of the Postoffice, and also concerning the 
uutrTunate affair that has recently called 
special attention thereto. . 

No attempt has been made to secure a long list 
of names, first, because the time which could be 
° ven to it was limited, and secondly, because it 
was not deemed necessary The signat ores of a 
few in the principal professions and line. . ot 
business of Oakland must stand for all. You 
may accept the accompanying document as prac- 
tically the unanimous voice of the community, 
irrespective of party. , , 

Accept assurances of my personal regard and 
consideration, and, believe me, 

Ve, - ytrulyy0 Tc. HENRY, 

Mayor of the City of Oakland. 



ADMINISTRATION OF THE OAKLAND 
POSTOFFICE. 

W E DARGIE, Esq., Postmaster, Oak- 
land Cal.— Dear Sir; In view of the recent 
attempt of one of your employes to cast re- 
proach upon you and your administration, n 
Connection with the late election, by publicly 
charging that you were guilty of a violation of 
the Civil Service laws in allowing political 
assessments to be levied upon the employ's in 
your office, we the undersigned, your fellow-citi- 
zens taxpayers, business men and residents ot 
the 'city of Oakland, take this opportunity and 
this method of assuring you of our continued 
confidence and esteem, and of expressing to you 
our gratification at your full and complete vin- 
dication, not only at the hands of your emproyes, 
but at the bands of a sworn jury of your peers. 
We beg further to acknowledge our obligations 
to you for the exceptionally able and efficient 
manner in which the affairs of your office have 
been administered. It is but a simple act of 
justice for us to record here what is known and 
acknowledged by every one having any business 
whatever with the Office, viz: That you have 
given us the very best postal service which this 
city has ever known. ,.j„„j 

The reforms which vou have inaugurated and 
enforced have resulted in greater promptness and 
accuracy in the distribution and delivery of the 
mails; longer, better and more courteous and pa- 
tient attention at all the windows and desks; an 
increase in the free delivery service, and a 
marked improvement in the personnel of the 
force. It is a matter of very great regret and 
chagrin to us that among your force there should 
be one who, to gratify personal disappointment 
or from more unworthy motives, should attempt 
to bring into discredit and d^»* V£P"r 
ment of the public service of which all Oakland- 
ers, irrespective of political or personal friend- 
ship to you, are justly proud: 
A C Henry, Mayor of Oakland. 
H A Palmer, Pres Union National Bank of Oak. 
C E P-ilmer, Cashier Union National Bank.Oak. 
E Sessions, President Oak Bank of Savings. 
V D Moody,Pres First National Bank, Oakland. 



A D Thomson.Cashier First National Bank.Oak. 
W H H Graves, Union National Bank. 
D H Ward, General Manager Judson Mtg l*o. 
W C Little, lumber dealer 
R W Kirkham, capitalist. Eighth and Oak. 
Henry Rogers, lumber dealer, 1209 Jackson. 
Walter Blair, President B and PRE. Co. 
C W Kellogg.Cordage Manufacturer,12o3 Grove 
A Chabot, Pres Contra Costa Water Company 
N Hamilton, Judge Superior Gourt,1271 Jackson. 
WE Greene, Judge Superior C-urt, 522 E 11th. 
E M Gibson, Judge SuprCourt 121o Jefferson. 
Geo CPerkios, ex-Gov Cal.cor Adeline & Tenth. 
John Daggett, Lieutenant-Governor of Cahfor. 
SB McKee?Justice Supreme Court,1033 Adeline 
Edwin Goodall, Shipping Merchant. 
HTubbs.Proprietor Cordage Co, Oakland. 
Wm D English, Powder Co 128 10th 
Geo E Whitney, State Senator, 107b 14th. 
Henry Vrooman, State Senator, 609 lbtb. 
A P Bray ton, Pacific Iron Works, 1167 Jackson. 
R W Snow, hardware, 672 Fourteenth. 
J K McLean, Pastor First Congregatnl Church 
Benj Akerly, Rector St John's Episcopal Church 
Mich King, Rector Chch of Immaculate Concep. 
G S Abbott, ex-Pastor First Baptist Church 
C O Brigham, Wholesale Provisions, 1019 Oak. 
J CNorris, CashierP CS S Co ,,1268 Harrison 
E H Pardee, ex-Mayor & ex-State Senator Oak. 
Peter Thomson, Oakland Knitting Mills, Oak. 
G W McNear, Grain Dealer, 957 Linden. 
E H Gray, Pastor First Baptist Church. 
MS Levy, Pastor Hebrew Church. 
HobartChetwood, Rector of St. Paul's Church. 
T L Barker. Merchant, 1119 Castro. 
N W Spaulding, Assistant Treasurer U S, 25th. 
I W Taber, Photographer, 1351 Madison 
E F Burten, Supt U S Mint, 3d ave and 14th. 
1 N Knowles, Merchant, cor Jackson and loth. 
A M Simpson, Merchant, 1265 Grove street. 
Edward P Flint, Merchant, 513 Thirteenth. 
CD Haven, Underwriter, Eighth near Adeline. 
IsaacUpbam, Books & Stationery,115o Jackson. 
OHver Hawes, Underwriter.^ 13th & Jefferson. 
fl.; Q V Sawver. Insurance, 768 Ninth. 
L LBromwell, Secretary Cal Ins Co, 126 Ninth. 
C T Hopkins, Insurance. 947 Linden. 
E L G Steele, Merchant, 824 Jackson. 
Francis Blake, Merchant, Telegraph avenue. 
Wm Bartling, Bookbinder, 719 14th. 
Sam J Taylor, Merchant, 1160 A ice. 
J P Dyer, Stockbroker, 1257 Jackson. 
J W Hoskins, Miner. 660 Fourteenth 
H Hayes, President City Council, Oakland 
"Pacific Press," Printers & Binders, 1056 Castro. 

H Burnham, Oak Ping Mills, 1017 Madison. 
R MrKillican, Contractor, 560 Twenty fifth. 
Irfnk J Moffitt, Assemblyman 53 Diet 459 9th. 
F R Dean Lumber Manufacturer, 1 219 Grove. 
Mack Webber, Dep Col Port of S F, 7 th ave. 
B J Watson, Naval Officer Post of S F. 
E B Jerome Special Dep Col SF, Chestnut. 

1 Borland, Mining Operator, 192c 'Webster 

Alexander, Commission Mer, 1308 Webster. 
E M Hall, 1369 Jackson. 
A J Snyder, Real Estate Agent, 46/ 9th. 
TR Hardenburgh, Asst Bookkeeper U S Mint. 
George Babcock, Capitalist, 577 Thirty-fifth. 
KoMer & Chase Music Dealers 1105 Broadway. 
A Bruenn Music Dealer, 1070 Broadway. 
tJ, v Pennoyer Dry Goods.1163-1165 Brodway. 
S^alinlr Bro Dry Goods, 1063-1065 Broadway. 

1 C Meyer & Co,Dry Good 8 ,1157-1159 Broadway. 
I Abrahamson,' Dry Goods, 1117 Broadway. 
T Abrabamson, Dry Goods, 130 Kearny. 
BetrisonTuebmann.Dry Gds,1115 Broadway. 
KahnTsons, Dry Goods, 1003_ Broadway. 
Richard Jones, Dry Goods 95o Broadway. 
S Lathrop, Jewelry, 1059 Broadway. 
S Samuels, Jewelry 1011 Broadway 
S P Hall, District Attorney, 1220 Union. 
R W Edwards, Jewelry, 963 Broadway. 
F M Smith, Jewelry, 922 Broadway. 
C&ANordhausen,Clothing, 11th and Broadway. 
A Stein Clothing, 916 Broadway. 
Srown i McKinnon, Clothing, 1018 Broadway. 
W E Hale, Sheriff, 528 Knox street. 
M J KeUer, Gents' Furnishings, 1007 Broadway. 
Chas L Taylor Carpts and Furniture, Broadway. 
E Hook'carpete and Furniture, 1110 Broadway. 

Pierce & Co, Hardware, 971 Broadway. 

W & MEverson, Hardware. 927 Broadway. 

Geo S Brown, Hardware. 972 Broadway. 

F D Hinds, Recorder, 827 Castro, 

Kelsey & Flint, Apothecaries, 1073 Broadway 

Bart Morgan, Apothecary, Seventh and Market. 

H Bowman, Apothecary, 951 Broadway. 

Kirkland & Trowbridge, Apoths, 973 Broadway. 

J A Webster, Treasurer, 217 East Sixteenth. 

P M Bowen, Grocer, 1302 Sixteenth. 

Peter Baker, Grocer, 823 Broadway. 

John Gushing, Grocer 478 and 480 Ninth. 

R W Miller & Co, Mdse and Gro, 413 Twelfth 



Geo LNusbaumer.Co Surveyor, 814 Fourteenth. 
Jas J White, 1220 West. 
W C Mason, Grocer, 301 East Twelfth 
Jesse Robinson. Assessor Oak Tp, 911 Grove 
H W Baxter, Apoth, Fourteenth and Market. 
Leon Hershb'er, & Co Wine 853 W^bington. 
W M Watson & Co, Wine Mens, 474 Eleventh 
Cbas T Boardman, County Clerk and Auditor. 
Wm J Dingee, Real Estate, 460 and 462 Eighth. 
Grant I Taggart, Real Est, 460 and 462 Eighth. 
Wm G Henshaw, Real Estate, 941 Myrtle. 
Chas Newton, Real Estate, 950 Broadway- 
Fred E Whitney, Court Com, 911 Broadway. 

Will H Burrall, Real Estate, 9o0 Broadway. 
J P Beardsley, Real Estate. 912 Broadway. 

C E Lloyd, Real Estate, 918 Filbert. 

A Kceni". Real Estate, Gahndo Hotel. 

Wm H Jordan, Asssemblyman, 072 Seventeenth. 

Samuel Milbory, Real Estate 1325 .Alice 

C W McLaughlin, Real Estate, 466 ISinth. 

Louis Gottshall, Public Admr. 1003* Broadway. 

T B Bigelow, Real Estate, llo7 Jefferson. 

O I Denison, Real Estate. 

E W B°ck, Health Officer, 325 East Fifteenth. 

Dalziel & Moller, Plumbers, Gasfitters, etc., 

W B r °Hard'y',' Bookseller and Stationer, 961 

M P^an'tom, Bookseller and Stationer, Bdwy. 

Wm B In°ersoll, Photographer, 1069 Broadway. 

C F Burglss, Photographer, 911 Broadway. 

M Meussdorffer, Hats and Caps, 1013 Broadway. 

M Brink, Hats and Caps, 967 Broadway. 

Logan & Savage, Real Estate Agent, 481 Ninth. 

WE Miller, Insurance, 12/7 Webster. 

H B Houghton, Insurance, 924 Broadway. 

H Griffin, Insurance, 312 Fourteenth. 

Chaplin & Williamson, Boots and Shoes, B dwy. 

S F Daniels, Police Judge, Oakland. 

F R Stevenson & Co.,China,Crockery,etc.Oak d. 

D Hauser, China, Crockery, C'^^tn'-KBrlwv 

C B Rutherford, Dealer in Paints and O.lsBdwy. 

EG Smith, Insurance, 9th and Washington. 

H F Gordon, Insurance, 924 Broadway 

Wm. K Rowell, Notary Public 410 13th. 

J M Dillon, City Assessor, Oakland. 

E Bernstein, Notary Public, ,958 Bro'.dway. 

Henry Hauschildt.Bootsfe Shoes 14th and Bdwy. 

C T Johns, City Attorney, Oakland. 

WH Nolan, Boots and Shoes, Centennial House. 

J A Wiswell, Dealer in Paints and Oils, 960 Bd y. 

A D Edgerton, 903 Broadway. 

P Pumvea, Capt. Police, Oakland. 

A A Moore, Attorney-at-law, 20th st. and 6th ave. 

1 W Bishop, Attorney-at-law 139o Ham on. 

John F Havens, Attorney-at-law, 1267 West. 

F W Henshaw, City Justice. 

Idw. C Robtns'on, Atty-at-law, 1003.V Broadway. 

C C Jenks, City Justice. , 

E H Woolsey, Phys. and Surgeon, 12th and Bdy. 

R E Cole, Dentist, 1003J Broadway. 

Tnhn P Reilav. Physician, 1209 Clay. 

A F MeSiman' & Son, Dentist, 1003.J Broadway. 

J B Bradway, Physician and Surgeon, /20 11th. 

W H Craig, Deutist, 1020 Jefferson. 

D N Baldwin, Physician, 1003.J Broadway 

M W Fish, Physician, 461 East Fourteenth. 

W F Southard, Physician, 969 Broadway. 

L S Burchard Physician, 12th and Broadway. 

T W Hall, Dentist, Twelfth and Broadway. 

J C Tucker, Physician, 1051 Market. 

THPinkerton, Physician, 1014 Broadway. 

E Hosford, Physician, 1014 Broadway. 

J F Burdick, Physician and Surgeon, 1003J. Bdy. 

Peter H McGrew, Contractor Oak and 

Wm T Hamilton, Coroner, 466 Thirteenth 

J C Gllson, Superintendent "{Oakland School 

J B McChesney, Principa of Oak. High School. 

Samuel I Black, Principal Tompkins School. 

D T Fowler, Principal Prescott School. 

Isaac Wright, Principal Oakland Academy. 

Wm D Arms, Principal Oakland Academy. 

A F'Craven, Principal Durant School. 

WH O'Brien, Principal Military Academy. 

H^suryEJewitt, Principal Hopkins Academy. 

Jas. C Martin, Attorney-at-law, 126b Grove 

fj m W Reed Attorney-at-law, 9/4 bixteentn. 

Fred L Batten, Attorney-at-law, 969 Broadway. 

Wm R Davis, Attorney-at-law ol4 Eightee^ , h. 

J H Smith, Attorney-at-law, 532 Thirty-fourth. 

Tohn Yule Attorney at-law, 562 Eightb. 

V H Metcalf, Attorney-at-law, 1263 Harrison. 

Gea D Metcalf, Attorney-at-law , 9b0 Broadway 

Willes Whitmore, Attorney-at-law 121o West. 

M C Chapman, Attorney-at-law, «* 18th. 

Geo. E DeGolia, Attorney-at-law Court House. 

W W Allen, Attorney-at-law, 571 Ihird. 

Geo. W Lewis, Attorney-at-law, 921 Broadway. 

Henry Miller, Attorney-at-law, 453 Eighth. 

T,,hn H Brewer, Attorney-at-law, o78 l.ith. 

Chas N Fox, Attorney-at-law, 1057 Broadway. 

BMcFaclden;Attorney.at-l r v228Nin^h 

John B Mhoon, Attorney-at-law, 1017 Adeline 



J,IM. 17, If 



i'AIJKORNIA ADVERTISER. 



19 



SCIEN TIFIC AND USEFUL. 

The Gutta Pcrcha Supply. Tin- rapid expansion of talagrtphy 
niakfi« it :i matter >'f tha gveatett importance that thero ihoald be no 
diminution in tbo rappty of nutta porcba, a product which ia in<li«p<n»a- 
Me to the electrician. There in tnuoh rttMOD to fear, however, that such 
* diminution will befon long 1k> experienced. The demand f.»r gutta 
porch* in alway* Jncnoiing. while the supply is falling off. The Datives 

-■f Sumatra ami the neigODOriDS ialftadl do not properly cultivate the 
gu tt a p oto h a tree. ■nd much of it* product is iimorantly wasted. One 
OOnaequODOl <>f toil in that, within a comparatively brief period, the 
I 'rife of gutta |H>rcha ha» trebled ; another, and a very serious conse- 
quence, is that the falsifier has turned his attention in this direction, and 
has placed on the market many worthless imitations. A short time ago 
M. Seiigmann-Lal was deputed by the French Government to consider 
in what manner the production might be increased, and in the report 
which he has lately made he recommends that plantations should be es- 
tablished of trees which yield the best gutta perch a. As the cultivation 
of these trees is ?ery profitable, the English, French and Dutch Asiatic 
colonies would find an assured source of revenue in growing gutta perch a. 

The Length of French Ralls.— It is stated that the first railway in 
France, viz., from St. Ktienne to Andrezieux, had rails only 3 feet 11 
baches long, and weighing 4"> pounds. This was in 1828 ; but in 1832, on 
the line from St. Ktieune to Lyons, the rail had increased in length to 
about 14 feet 8 inches, and to 132 pounds weight. Various increases con- 
tinued thus to be made in France, until the length reached 19 feet 6 
inches. The great objection urged against the increase of length was that 
the iron rail exfoliated and was damaged at any point, instead of only at 
the ends. The case is different, however, with steel rails, these being 
now turned out in Belgium and France some 85 feet in length. Consid- 
ering the dilation due to chauges of temperature, the maximum length of 
a French rail will probably be fixed at about 40 feet 3 inches. 

A New Embalming Process.— An embalming process, to be used in 
place of cremation, or in conjunction with it, has been devised by a Bir- 
mingham chemist, by whose method the bodies would be loosely but 
completely enveloped in cotton wool within cases which would be riveted 
up. They would then be exposed in underground galleries, lined with 
impervious cement, to a current of cold and dry air, from which the 
germs of putrefaction would be removed by filtration. The cooling would 
be effected by machinery worked on the compressed-air principle, and the 
air traversing the chambers would be dried by any suitable agents. At 
first thorough cooling would be necessary, but after a time the drying 
could be effected more rapidly at a higher temperature. The process 
would result in the formation of mummies with white integument similar 
to those produced by the most efficient and costly system of embalming 
in ancient Egypt. 

Glass as a Flooring Material.— The substitution of glass flooring 
for boards continues to increase in Paris, this being especially the case 
in those business structures in which the cellars are used as offices. At 
the headquarters of the Credit Lyonnais, on the Boulevard des Italiens, 
the whole of the ground floor is paved with large squares of roughened 
glass imbedded in a strong iron frame, and in the cellars beneath there is 
thus sufficient light, even on dull days, to enable the clerks to work with- 
out gas. The large central hall at the offices of the Comptoir d'Escompte 
has also been provided with this kind of flooring, and it is said that, al- 
though its prime cost is considerably greater than that of boards, glass is 
in the long run far cheaper, owing to its almoBt unlimited durability. 

A FEW " CATERER " RECIPES. 

Pilaf is the name of a Greek dish, which is becoming very popular in 
England. _ It is made as follows : Get some broth, boiling, add butter, 
and put in an amount of rice proportionate to the size of the dish re- 
quired. Stir it until the rice is well boiled, adding from time to time 
tomato sauce, or better still, slices of fresh tomatoes. When properly 
boiled, add two or three pats of butter, and serve hot. The rice should 
be neither dry nor floating in liquid — a happy medium between the two. 
Pilaf is very good with larks, pieces of chicken, or any kind of meat. It 
can also be eaten alone. 

Here is a receipt for a sauce which is moat delicious, and which, be- 
ing of truffles, can be eaten with almost any dish. It is called Sauce 
Perigenx : Chop up some lean ham into small dice, and mix it with an 
onion and shallot minced very fine. Fry this with some butter in a sauce- 
pan until the onion has browned the whole, when add a little white wine 
and let simmer. Make some browned butter, mix the sauce with it, with 
an equal quantity of bouillon and shredded truffles. Let it simmer again 
until it becomes of the consistency of sauce. Pass it through a sieve and 
add as many truffles as possible, cut into slices, when the sauce will be 
ready for use. 

The moss or dried grass, with which Chinese exporters pack up their 
fragile wares, is glutinous when boiled, and costs nothing. A Chinese 
importer will give it to you if you will cart it off his premises. Add glu- 
cose, flavoring essence and a little dye, and there you are, with first-rate 
(factory-made) raspberry jam; prime cost, one centime a pot, to be re- 
tailed at twelve cents a pound. 

Crystallzed fruits make a very acceptable dish for dessert ; they or- 
nament the table and please the palate. They should be arranged with 
due regard to color, the darker hues, such as greengages, being used for 
the base, and the brighter ones, such as apricots and oranges, for the up- 
per part, the chinks and crevices being filled with cherries and raspberries. 

For tarts and pies, or for stewed fruit, either alone or mixed with 
apples, cranberries are well adapted, and fill a gap at a time when other 
fresh fruit is scarce. Russian cranberries are now in perfection, and may 
be obtained in convenient'sized kegs of Messrs. Tasker & Richardson, of 
Hull, who are direct importers. 

See advertisement on cover to know where to get the genuine 
Krug Champagne from Reims, France. Beware of California and other 
counterfeits. 

Grand concerts in the Park on Saturday and Sunday, under the aus- 
pices of the Market-street Cable Railway Company. 



CALIFORNIA SUCAR REFINERY, 

OFFICE, 327 MARKET 8TKEKT- REI'l.VKRI, l'<> ■ Itl.Kli. 

I I.Ai s BPBBOKEU i , 

■' " BPMOKHLfl vfc , .. 

A. B. SI'KECKELS -., 

WM. T. COLEMAN & CO., 

SHIPPING AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS. 

Represented by: 
AGENCY OP AGENCY OF 

WM. T. COLEMAN & CO., WM. T, COLEMAN & CO.. 

38 BIVER STREET. Flavel's Warehouse, 

Ohlcigo, Jliin.iiH. Astoria, Orqp>n. 

MR. EUGENE E. JONE, 

4 BISHOPSQATE STREET WITHIN. 
LONDON, E. 0. 

!5mi Francisco and Ne-w York. 
U. IS. Williams. a. CmuisBFtouall. W. H. Dimosd. 

WILLIAMS, DIMOND & CO., 

SHIPPING AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS, 

UNION BUILDING JUNCTION MARKET AND PINE STREETS. 

Agents for Pacific Mail Steamship Company, Pacific Steam Navigation Company, 
The Cunard Royal Mai! Steamship Company. "The California Lino of Clippers," 
from New York and Boston, and " The Hawaiian Line." March 22. 



E. L. G. STEELE & CO. 

(Successors to C. ADOLPHE LOW A CO.), 

Shipping and Commission Merchants, 

— AGENTS: — 

American Sugar Refinery and Washington Salmon Cannery, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

H. M. NEWHALL & CO., 

GENERAL SHIPPING AND COMMISSION MEEOHANTS, 
NO. 309 SANSOME STREET, 

[Jan. 12.] SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA. 

STORAGE. 

FURNITURE, PIANOS, TRUNKS, PAINTINGS, MIRRORS, CARPETS, ORNA- 
MENTS and other Goods Received for STORAGE and SAFE-KEEPING. 
Goods Stored in Clean, Liyht, Dry Lofts. Charges moderate. ADVANCES made. 
INSURANCE EFFECTED. 

CALIFORNIA STORAGE WAREHOUSE, 

722 Mission street Next to Grand Opera House 

THOMAS H. ROONEY & CO. 

SAVAGE, SON & CO., 

EMPIRE FOUNDRY AND MACHINE WORKS 
Nos. 135 to 143 Fremont street, 

SAN FRANCISCO, 

Manufacturers of STEAM ENGINES, SAWMILL MACHINERY, CABLE-ROAD 

CASTINGS, QUARTZ-WORK and ARCHITECTURAL IRON GOODS. 

62" Estimates Free. August 2. 

DR. RICORD'S RESTORATIVE PILLS. 

Bay None bat the Genuine; n Specific ror Exhausted Vital- 
ity, Physical Debility, Wasted Forces, etc. Approved by the Academy of 
Medicine, Paris, and by Medical Celebrities of the World. 

AGENTS for California and the Pacific States, J. G. STEELE & CO., 635 Market 
street (Palace Hotel), Sun Francisco. 
Sent by Mail or Express anywhere. 

Prices Reduced. 

Box of fifty, §1 25; of one hundred, $2 00; of two hundred, $3 50; of four 
hundred, $0 00. Preparatory Pills, S2 00. 
gar Send for Circular. Oct. 4. 

F. D A.NBRI & CO., 

— DKALER8 IN — 

WINES, LIQUORS*, GROCERIES, 

27 and 29 California Street, 

[Dec. 15.] Between Davis and Drumm, San Francisco. 



SELBY SMELTING AND LEAD COMPANY, 

416 Montgomery Street San Francisco 

Gold and Silver Refinery and Assay Office. 

Highest Prices Paid for Gold, Silver and Lead Ores and Sulphureta. Manufac- 
turers of BLUESTONE. Also, Lead Pipe, Sheet Lead, Shot, etc. This Company 
has the best facilities on the Coast for working GOLD, SILVER and LEAD in their 
various forms. 

June 18. PRENTISS SELBY. Superintendent. 

SEND YOUR ORDERS EARLY FOR REPAIRS TO 
H. G. FISKE, the Pioneer Roofer, 

827 Market street, Opposite Stockton. 



ROOFS. 



20 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Jan. 17, 1885. 



COMMENTS ON FOREIGN AFFAIRS. 

The desperate and bloody deed which occurred in O'Donovan 
Rossa's office, in New York, last week a well worthy of the attention 
of the American people. It is a broad intimation of the fact that this 
band of foreign criminals and desperadoes, who have been org; »m. edra 
this country, under the protection of our Government, for _the avowed 
purpose of assailing the peace and prosperity of the people of a fnendly 
power, may, by transferring the theatre of their operations to this coun- 
try and making each other the objects of their fiendish disposition, give 
organized society untold trouble. Nor is the fact that this incident ha 
impressively demonstrated that one object of this reckless and criminal 
organization is to place dynamite on board ships carrying passengers ob- 
jectionable to it, with a view to their destruction, a circumstance to be 
lightly considered. Thousands of American citizens and their families 
are crossing the Atlantic each week, and if, one of these days a ship or 
two is blown to pieces, and a few hundred human lives sacrificed by these 
cowardly brutes, the great American people will probably pause, in their 
hunt after the almighty dollar, long enough to inquire if it was quite the 
correct thing t.. not merely permit this organized band of criminals to ex- 
ist in their midst, but also to permit them to do pretty much as they 

P ITsmarck has again been beaten in the Reichstag, and this time the 
beating seems to be something more than a mere farce because it is in 
regard to an appropriation which is something over which that celebrated 
legislative body exercises more than nominal power. The question at ib- 
sue was an appropriation to defray the expenses of the African Coloniza- 
tion scheme. Thi B scheme apparently does not receive the enthusiastic 
support of the Reichstag, and, as that body is a representative one, it is 
to be presumed the German people are not thirsting for African colonies. 
At any rate, the credit asked for was reduced by one-third. It is more 
than probable, however, that Bismarck will find some way of setting at 
defiance the mandate of the people's representatives. 

A new department is about to be created in the British Government. 
It will be known as the Department of Education, and the Minister in 
charge of it will have a seat in the Cabinet. This change is important in 
that it indicates that the Government will hereafter take a closer and 
more active interest in the education of the people, and that that interest 
will be continuous, and not spasmodic. The result cannot fail to bene- 
ficially affect the national life and the social compact. 

It is rumored that Germany and France have reached a complete un- 
derstanding in regard to the Egyptian financial difficulty. If this is true, 
it simply means that Bismarck has reached some kind of an understand- 
ing with Ferry, under which the French Ministry is to badger and annoy 
the British Government, in which proceeding it is to be supported by 
Germany. This, however, is a very dangerous game to play, because John 
Bull does not take kindly to badgering, and be is quite capable of taking 
care of himself, his honor, and his interests, when it comes to hard kcockB. 
By the way, it may be mentioned in this connection, that the way in 
which Germany has been acting toward England, lately, is utterly unjus- 
tifiable and perfectly scandalous, and Laboucbere's advice to the effect 
that the army of German pauper Princes the British people have so long 
been taxed to support should be sent back home, bag and baggage, would 
seem to be a very proper and effective sort of retaliation. 

The acquittal in Paris, laBt week, of Madame Clovis-Hugues on the 
charge of murdering Morin, has brought to a termination one of the 
most remarkable criminal cases which have occurred in Europe tor a 
lon» time. The woman no doubt committed murder, but the provoca- 
tion she received was certainly very great. Her trial, too, and the man- 
ner of her acquittal contrast very favorably with the American system. 
There was no humbug, no pretense of irresponsibility on the ground of 
insanity, and no perjury in regard to the number of shots tired and who 
was the aggressor. The square, straight, clean, truthful issue was put 
to the jury, and it looks as though that body had done pretty substantial 
justice, for there can be no doubt but that Morin deserved to die the death 
of a dog. — ■" , . , , 

German colonization on the African coast seems to be modeled alter 
Bismarck's European and domestic policy. It is blood and iron. It has 
scarcely begun yet, and already there have been quite a number of dif- 
ficulties with the natives. This week news comes to hand of the bom- 
bardment, by two German war ships. «f a native town on the West 
Coast This may be very good practice for the sailors, but it is a very 
poor method of colonizing. As the News Letter has intimated, the 
German system cannot be successfully transplanted. 

The Franco-Chinese imbroglio is again beginning to take some shape- 
on paper, at any rate. Considerable French reinforcements are being 
forwarded to the theatre of war, or, rather, to the place which will be 
the theatre of war. should such a calamity occur. Earnest preparations 
are also being made, apparently, to keep on forwarding troops and muni- 
tions of war, and there is talk, on the boulevards, of an expedition to 
Pekin The talk of the boulevards, however, does not really amount to 
much, and the expedition is unlikely to start. Unless appearances are 
very deceptive, the days of military promenades to Pekin are passed. 

POSTMASTER DARGIE'S VINDICATION. 

The charges which were brought against the present Postmaster of 
Oakland by a former employee of that office, in regard to certain alleged 
breaches of the Civil Service law, having been carefully examined into 
by the United States Grand Jury, that body this week submitted a_ re- 
port completely exonerating the accused gentleman. This result is a 
satisfactory one, and haB been received with every manifestation of 
pleasure by the people of Oakland, who have enjoyed under Mr. Dargie s 
administration a postal service which could scarcely be improved upon, 
and which constitutes a striking contrast to previous administrations. 
The inhabitants of Oakland have given marked evidence of their appre- 
ciation of Postmaster Dargie by uniting, without regard to politics, and 
at a moment's notice, in a card, couched in the most flattering terms, con- 
gratulating him upon the result of the investigation into his official con- 
duct Few men have, while occupying official station, given such uni- 
versal satisfaction as to call forth Buch a spontaneous expression of good 
will and esteem. 



SILVER KING MINING COMPANY. 
The annual meeting of the above-named company, which was held 
at its office in this city on Tuesday last, was unusually stormy. The ad- 
vent of Mr. James L. Crittenden, as attorney for some local stockhold- 
ers produced a breeze which threatens to assume the more violent 
proportions of a hurricane in the near future. The proceedings opened 
with a demand from Mr. Crittenden that those present should prove their 
right, either by stock or proxy, to be present at the meeting, which re- 
sulted in an exhibition, on the part of the inside, of 90,219 shares, 71,909 
of which were in the form of proxies. The opposition, being only in pos- 
session of some 1,047 shares, bad, of course, very little show against such 
formidable odds, but nevertheless, their representative, Mr. Crittenden, 
stubbornly contested every point, and vigorously protested against the 
slip-slop and careless method by which matters of the most vital import- 
ance to stockholders were passed over, objecting to the wholesale ratifi- 
cation of proceedings and acts of the officers and Board of Directors, un- 
less each act and proceeding should be read at the meeting and fully 
stated before any ratification of the same. The gentleman claimed that 
his information led him to believe that certain amounts of money, paid 
in settlement of claims against the company, were incorrect, and argued 
that it was not fair and just to absent stockholders to ratify any proceed- 
ings without requiring a full and free disclosure of all the facts. He 
thereupon made a motion to appoint a committee to examine the report, 
and to have the same read. Not being able, however, to obtain a second 
to his motion, it was lost, and the report was ratified as it stood. A self- 
laudatory resolution was then put aud carried, expressing how highly the 
stockholders appreciated the services of the General Manager and the 
Board of Directors, and thanking them therefor. This measure, coming, 
as it did from one of the Directors themsleves, whose only apparent in- 
terest in stockholders was limited to the number of shares he could con- 
trol by proxy, elicited a few remarks from the legal representative of the 
minority, which had a rather dampening effect on the self-congratulated 
Directory. 

He announced that it was the intention of stockholders represented by 
him, to bring suit against the officers of the company for the recovery of 
a large amount of money that has been received, and that he believes 
has never been paid into the company. The amount exceeds WOO.OOO. 
The Directors who were present at the meeting, had procured proxies 
of stock, and proposed, by means of said proxies, now to cover up their 
own acts and negligences, and to defeat the rights of stockholders who 
were ignorant as to their mismanagement of its affairs, of the misappro- 
priation of its money, and to prevent the enforcement of their rights bv 
judicial proceedings. That the parties who were attempting to whitewash 
the past are Directors of the company, and as such, are liable to the 
stockholders. 

That they, by their mismanagement of its affairs, and acting under the 
direction and influence of I. M. Barney and his agent, B. A. Barney, en- 
abled I M Barney to divert from the company more than !>o00,000. 1 he 
Directors he said, very well knew when passing these resolutions that a 
suit was about to be brought by stockholders to recover the amount mis- 
appropriated under a lease of the mine made— or pretended to be made— 
by I M Barney, whilst Manager of this company and a Director, to one 
Philips, his private book-keeper, the said lease to be transferred to him- 
self for his undivided profit. 

Proxies were given in ignorance of the affairs of the company and of 
the malfeasance above stated, and it was unjust to stockholders to ratify 
such actions without permitting a strict investigation. A stockholder 
who had personally made a demand for papers relating to some affairs of 
this company, showing a fraud upon its stockholders could not obtain 
them, and these papers ought to be in the custody of the President of the 

C °Alto° ether, the meeting was one of the liveliest of its kind held in 
this town for some time past, and some of the remarks could not exactly 
be termed parliamentary. The insiders naturally elected their own ticket 
for Directors during the ensuing year, although an opposition one was 
placed in the field by Mr. Crittenden. 



OBITUARY. 

Rev Dr W A. Scott.— There are few men better known or more 
universally' respected in this community than William Anderson Scott, 
the late pastor of St. John's Presbyterian Church of this city An ac- 
complished scholar, a deep thinker, and an earnest believer, it was but 
natural that he should draw around him the love and eBteem of a large 
circle of the intellectual men and women with whom he came in contact, 
and that he Bhould make his mark in the world of thought as well as in 
the world of society. Dr. Scott was born in Bedford county, Tennessee, 
in January, 1813, and, consequently, was seventy-two years of age at 
the time of his death. He was educated for the Presbyterian ministry, 
and after being ordained, applied himself to educational pursuits. He 
occupied the position of principal of several of the largest seminaries in 
the South, and afterwards occupied a chair in the faculty of the Iheo- 
logical Seminary of the Pacific. The deceased gentleman was a famous 
linguist, having no less than thirteen different languages at his command. 
He° was also the author of some four or five standard theological works. 
He had been pastor of several of the leading churches of his denomina- 
tion in the country, and had charge of St. John's since its formation in 
1870. 

H C Hoyt.-In the death of Henry Clay Hoyt, the well-known 
marine 'reporter of the Merchants' Exchange since its foundation, the 
mercantile community may be said to have lost one of its landmarks 
The deceased was born but thirty-eight . years ago, and consequently • he 
passed over the silent river before his time. He came to this coast as a 
boy, with his father, who kept a boat-house, where the boy P^dupa 
thorough knowledge of bay aquatics. About his first employmentin life 
was that of marine reporter for Sweeney & Baugh's old Exchange and 
he passed with the concern when the present Exchange bought t out 
Mr Hoyt was a man of great personal courage, and has, from time to 
time, rescued no less than twenty-one persons from a watery grave He 
was also a man of wonderful memory, being a perfect encyclopedia in 
regard to ships and ships' officers. He was a genial companion and phe- 
nomenally trustworthy. 












Vol. 35 



SAN FRANOISOO, SATURDAY. JAN. 31, 1885. 



No. 30. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



A Hill .f ParttfiiUrt 8 

A Unit;.! CapUUl 1> 

Achievement ij>-".-irO 4 

..." 1 :. 

A Dej ui Uld'Wiuler u*H-T.r\> W 

An Infamous Pair 10 

An Outraged [ndnitrj l j 

A Streak <-i POTtOlM HI 

Aiwfalian Mid Not Zealand Notes.... 8 

"tiiz" v.i 

Ooramenta oo Foreign Affairs 80 

Cradle. Altar and Tomb 18 

Buthquakea 2 

Fashion's Voice "2 

Financial Review l 

Game Birds of California— No 3 IS 

Uo§sip from New York 4 

p n'try). .... . 19 

v will Retrench ->o 



" incomprehensible " 12 

8 

Uili >riUk' in Useless Aynny It 

Mar's Letter it 

Noubllia..... ...Hi 

Parisian Uotuip 15 

PloiMJuro'H Wand. 6 

Passing Remarks fi 

Real Estate Transactions 17 

Si lontlflO and Useful 8 

Short Stories 4 

Society z 

Sporting 7 

Sunbeams 1) 

The Cash Girl (poetry) V2 

The Outside Dog (poetrv) 12 

TheTug "Relief" ->i> 

The World, the Flesh and Devil 9 

Town Crier 11 



FINANCIAL REVIEW. 

The Local Mining Market has been uneventful during the week, with 
the exception of some light fluctuations in Norcross. The future of the 
market depends wholly on the result of present operations in the mine. 
The lower levels in all the others are virtually abandaned, work being 
confined to the levels extending from the 250 to the 1,750 levels. As we 
remarked last week, of course, this must tend to a larger ore production 
and more grist for the millmen. This is already noticeable, and para- 
graphs have appeared in the mining papers recounting the increased 
number of carloads shipped daily. Things look watery for Coll Deane 
and his associate bonanza friends. Cork jackets and the latest improve- 
ments in life-preservers must figure as important items in the parapher- 
nalia required in pursuing their favorite hobbies through the darkened 
depths of the lower levels. We wish them success in their enterprite 
undertaken for the benefit of a gambling humanity, and we do so in the 
same kind of a broken-dowu spirit we might adopt were we waving a 
last adieu to some kindred band of maniacs who felt duty bound to sacri- 
fice their lives in a vain attempt to locate the North Pole. 

Explorations have again been started in the west crosscut on the 2,800 
foot level of Hale and Norcross. This was in some 10 feet, if we remem- 
ber aright, when work was stopped last summer. It is now possible that 
the rich ore encountered at that time may improve in quantity and qual- 
ity ; if it does, there is every likelihood that the stock will enhance in 
value. Norcross has been a favorite stock for some years, and has many 
friends on the street who have held on to their shares through thick and 
t liiu. It would be pleasant to see their hopes realized and their fidelit; 
fittingly rewarded. 

The 500-foot level of Ophir is nearing the Mexican line and crosscut- 
ting will soon be commenced on this drift. 

The hoisting works of Sierra Nevada are being put in order to prospect 
the lower levels. Water is now over the 2,500-foot level in Union. 

Navajo shipped §14,000 on the 20th, making a total for the month of 
3)42,000. 

Wonders will never cease. Kossuth, which has collected over S400.000 
in assessments, has at last announced a dividend of six cents. Though 
small, like the widow's mite, it is better than nothing, and places Kossuth 
at last on record as a dividend-paying mine. 

Work is about being started at Bellville on ore from the Mount Diablo 
and Holmes Mines. The annual meeting of the latter takes place on 
the 20th prox. 

What has become of the Potosi people that they do not begin suit to 
recover the Holmes ground, which was segregated in such a peculiar man- 
ner? Have they been gobbled alive by Hay ward and Holmes? 

Grand Prize delinquent ; sale took place during the week. As the in- 
debtedness on the 1st inst. amounted to over $22,000, another assessment 
is now in order. 

The reports in regard to the late discoveries at New River are conflict- 
ing, and nothing can be positively ascertained before Spring. We glean, 
from some reliable letters recently received, that the middle of April is 
time enough to leave for this portion of the country. The citizens of 
Eureka, which is the most important town adjacent to these mines, seem, 
however, to be fully satisfied that a new bonanza has been discovered, 
and, determined to take the bull by the horns, are advocating the advisa- 
bility of organising a local Stock Exchange to prevent San Francisco mo- 
nopolizing the business, and also in the belief that buying and selling 
stocks by an organized method has an advantage in assisting the pros- 
pector, which outweighs the more obvious disadvantages and demerits of 
the system. 

About a mile and a half from the great Silver Belt of Shasta county, 
on which is situated the " Anaconda," " Silver Star " and Windy Camp 
series of mines, a large ledge of gold-bearing ore has lately been discov- 
ered. So far it has not been sufficiently prospected to ascertain its true 
value, but we hope in our next issue to be able to give more information 
in regard to this latest find. Capitalists are being attracted towards this 
great mining county and lively times may be expected during the coming 
spring. 

The sale of the Quartz Mountain mine near Fresno to the French 
syndicate seems to be a m ost peculiar transaction from the beginning. 

London, January 89.— Consols, 99 15-16d. 



From what we can learn, the original owner, Mr. DeFreoe, of this city, 

has not yet received even a fraction of the purchase, and yet the 00 
have entered into possession and are prolog ahead full blant. Partial 
contest at present before the Superior Court in this city an to wl 
parties are who really sold the mine, may have something to do with the 
matter, the French liinctorn wishing to have all legal questions settled 
before making any payments. If the figures mentioned in the complaint 
referred to are correct, it appears an outrageous price to pay fur the prop- 
erty. It muBt have improved considerably within a very short time to 
be worth even a tenth of $650,000. 

The managers of the Silver King Mining Company are in decidedly 
warm water. Stockholders are rapidly falling into the ranks of the op- 
position party which opened the ball at the last annual meeting. If 
these geutlemen can prove only one-half of their assertions, and they 
seem pretty confident in their ability to do so, this corporation must be 
rotten to the core. How it has existed so long under this management 
without an inquiry being made into its affairs, is a question difficult to 
answer. 

Last year London recovered its position as the cheapest money market 
in the world, which it had lost since 1881. both Paris and Brussels having 
discounted on the average at lower rates than London during the two 
intervening years. The average rate for the whole of the money centers 
of Europe was also lower than in the three preceding years. Thus the 
London rate was considerably below the average, the cheapest centers 
after London being Paris, Amsterdam and Brussels, in the order named. 

The Richmond Consolidated Company lately received the following 
cablegram from the mine: "Week's run (one furnace) 815,000 from 299 
tons of ore. Refinery, 315.000. 

PRICES OF LEADING STOCKS AND GOV. BONDS. 









San Francisco, Jan. 30, 188S. 


Stocks and Bonds. 


Bid. 


Asked 


Stocks and Bonds. 


Bid. 


Asked 


BONDS. 








17 


224 


Cal. State Bonds, 6V67 


— 


— 


BANKS. 






S. F. City & Co. B'ds, 6s,*58 


— 


— 


Bank of California (ex div). 


-- 


157 


S. F. City & Co. B'ds, 7s ... 


— 


— 


Pacific Bank 


— 


— 




— 


— 


First National (ex div) .... 


115 


118 




— 


— 


RAILROADS. 






Sacramento City Bonds. . . . 


— 


— 




S8 


30 




— 


— 


0. P. R. R. Bonds (ex cou.) 


107 


110 




— 


— 




(10 


90 




— 


— 




65 


60 




— 


— 


N. B. and Mission R. R 


93 


04 J 




— 


- 


Sutter Street R. R 


1011 





Lob Angeles City Bonds.. . . 
Virg'a & Truckee R. R. Bds. 






_ 


— 


Central R. R. Co 


30 


25 


Nevada Co. N. G. R. R. Bds 


— 


— 




Nom. 


Nom. 




— 


— 


Clay Street Hi'l R. R 


_ 


_ 




I07J 
05} 


10SA 
9HJ 




01 
29 




S. P.R. R. Bonds 




30 


U S. is(excou) 


121$ 
99| 


l'J2 




55 


67J 




101 


Califor'a Powder Co 


125 


160 


INSURANCE COMPANIES. 






Giant Powder Co 


57 


024 




— 


_ 


Atlantic Giant Powder 

Gold and Stock Telejf'h Co. 


53 
67J 






61 




119 


134 


S.V.W.W.Co's Slock 


88} 


88} 








S.V.W.W.Co's Bonds 


lie] 


1164 


MISCELLANEOUS. 






Pacific Coast S.S.Co's Stock 








90 


110 


California Street R. R 


81 


82) 


37J 


\*\ 




10 


49 




40 
30 
10J 


48 
35 

4f 




55 






ISSURANCK COMPANIKS. 






112 


Hawaiian Commercial Co.. 


4 


i 


Fireman's Fund (ex div) ,. 


125 


130 




H 




101 


1064 







There is really nothing doing. First-class Bonds are scarce and difficult 
to purchase, even at full prices. A. Baird, 411 Montgomery street. 



G 



OLD BARS— 920 fine par.— Refined Silver— 16^18 # cent, dis- 
count. Mexican Dollars, 84i@85c. nominal. 

"Exchange on New York, 20c.@15c; on London Bankers, 49§d.@ 
49id. ; Paris, sight, 5-12.^@5-10 francs per dollar. Telegrams on New 
York, 25c.@30c. 



my Price of Money here, 6@10 per cent, per year — bank rate. In the 
open market, \@\\ P er month. Demand fair. On Bond Security, 
5@6 per cent, p er year, on Call. Demand good . 

W Latest price of Sterling in New York, 484A@487i. 

Agricultural, Grazing and Fruit Lands, — First-class lands, in large 
or small tracts, suitable tor all purposes. Situated near railroad, with 
plenty of fuel and water. Can be had at SI per acre ; 40 cents cash, bal- 
ance 1, 2 and 3 years' time, at 6 per cent, per annum. Thorough in- 
formation at this office. 

Latest from the Merchant's Exchange.— New York, Jan. 30, 1885. 
U. S. Bonds— 3s, 1014,, b ; 4s, 121J, b, ex-int. ; 4s, 1123, b. Sterling Ex- 
change, 484@487£. Western Union, 58. Market— Ver y inact i ve. 

Registered at the Pnstoffk-e »t San Francisco, California, as Sectmd-CiasB Matter. 



Printed and Published by the Proprietor, Frederick Marriott, 607 to 615 Merchant street, San Francisco, California. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Jan. 31, 1885. 



FASHION'S VOICE. 



It seems a little odd that the ladies of San Francisco never keep in 
the same mind for any length of time with regard to evening dresB. I 
allude to the incongruous gathering at the late operatic performances. 

When Abbott came here, a few short months ago, there was a perfect 
furore over the dresses to be worn. Milliners and dressmakers made a 
fine harvest, and the Baldwin presented an unusually brilliant appear- 
ance night after night; also, the streets presented another, highly com- 
forting to the cabbies, when long lines of carriages " stopped the way." 
" Want carriage, sir? " " Who wants carriage? " resounded through the 
air, nor did the questioners apply in vain; but all this was reversed on the 
second visit of the great and only Abbott. It was painful to look upon 
the change that bad come across the spirit of these erratic people's 
dreams. Here and there a bit of white satin, no bigger than the speck 
that heralds the white squall, would appear, and those who did nonor the 
singers by wearing their bangs only, were by no means conspicuous for 
the beauty of their attire. 

If there is any thing I admire in womankind it is consistency. Once 
dressed for the opera, let it be forever. The antics of some of the dames 
was peculiar; for instance, I saw one woman sitting in the orchestra 
amidst a pile of long dolmans and over-wraps, who had on a faded pink 
lustre. She had cut up a piece of the goods into a triangle, on one corner 
of which a rose was pinned with a black pin, mind you, and this sat flat 
on the top of her pate. She was a lanky specimen of nature's handiwork, 
tall withal, and so thin; oh my! one might have seen through her shape 
as well as her mind, which was evidently not strong, or she had never 
donned that gear. In fact, had Emma sang, on that memorable 
occasion, "The Last Rose of Summer," she might have justly taken it to 
herself as she sat and bloomed there alone. Then two other dames 
walked into the very front seats of the dress circle. Harry, who is noth- 
ing if not a wag, gave me a severe nudge with bis elbow, and shooting his 
dexter thumb toward the muffled figures who appeared among a full house, 
standing in the very front of it, said : "Say, what is it ? " What, indeed. 
There they stood; first they unfolded their heads, which were wrapped 
round with a few yards of light woolen knitted goods. Then the mantles 
were dropped — and these things being laid upon the seats to make them 
softer I opine, each lady began to arrange herself. They took out little 
bows and pinned them on "at the throat," as we say in the fashions. 
Then each did some pinning work at the back of the other's neck, then 
each pulled her bangs together, and to crown all, they and their escort 
produced three pairs of new gloves, which being somewhat small they got 
on with difficulty precisely as the first act was half over. Now I would 
remark that somewhere in the Bijou Theatre is a dressing room, and if 
these dames should see this article I hope they will take a hint, and in 
future refrain from robing in public. 

Two other head-dresses are worthy of mention. Two young women 
had knitted themselves peculiar hoods of split wool, having a thread of 
tinsel running through. These were pinned corner-wiBe on their heads, 
and hugged round their throats during the night. The opera being one I 
knew, I spent some time in looking around for novelties, and here they 
are — copy nr not, as you wish. Indeed, head-gear is altogether eccentric 
this season. Vide the feminines who are out on the mash every day at 
5 P. M. 

I followed a young woman, a day or two ago, who had an orange petti- 
coat with a green overskirt. This skirt was looped up here and there like 
a lambrequin, and on her head was a remarkably small wreath of dog- 
roses. It put me in mind of Knight's ballad, " She wore a wreath of 
roses," you know, or "do you know?" Then there was yet another. 
She was a small, nighty looking thing, but her head was a positive cau- 
tion. The whole of the front hair stood up as if under the influence of 
an electric shock — straight up, though fuzzy. 

Now, I have a ben in my back yard who is always seeking new and im- 
possible places wherein to lay. It struck me how delighted she would be 
if I could coax that young woman to take a siesta on the floor of the 
chicken yard and permit my volatile fowl to deposit an egg in that small 
furze bush surmounting her not bad looking face. This bush, of course, 
prevented the bonnet being seen. As I say, she looked electrified and 
scared ; but I turned on ray heel, and, following her, found out that the 
only covering on her head was a band of velvet fastened by a steel buckle. 
It was funny, if unbecoming. Then there was another guy in the White 
House. She certainly would never see 60 again, and yet her head !• Ah, 
well ! First, the face was very large, round and fat, with a species of 
dewlap hanging down from each cheek. Over her aged brow fell little 
curls, precisely resembling thin sausages, which, indeed, continued in a 
row all round her neck. Her bonnet was of black velvet, edged with orange. 
Do you remember those worn by Alma Stuart Stanley? A soft crown 
with a soft box pleating sewn rouad — which I may say flopped about her 
face. Well, think of this, in monster size, encompassing the rubicund 
visage of the ancient dame ! It was a remarkable get-up, indeed. And 
then she was putting on a kind of " don't-you-naughty-man " air, as she 
minced and flirted with the juvenile clerk. Not, indeed, that there is any 
reason why an old lady should not ogle a youthful male, after the exam- 
ple of Burdett-Couta. Certainly not — if not — why not ? 

Bonnets seem to find more favor than hata, and you should tie them 
under the chin with broad strings. True, this mode is trying, for I think 
it gives age to the face, which is decidedly againBt the success of the 
mode ; but, on the other hand, it hides wrinkles below the chin, which 
are a dead give-away to a young-looking old lady, and. there are many 
such nowadays. In fact, I think the elder branches of the female race 
are younger-looking than the younger, which is paradoxical, but doubt- 
less you will get at the bottom of my meaning, and then again you may 
not. Like a class in school, some catch on, and the others pretend to. 
The editor begged I would write up something useful. Here is a budget 
of patterns. May you profit by them. Silver Pen. 

E. Amaden, late of San Francisco, now of Yokohama, Japan, exports 
{skillfully packed) all classes of goods, from the rarest Curios and Works 
of Art to the more moderate grades, and invites correspondence. No. 18 
Yokohama, under Windsor Hotel. 

Mr, Edmund About is regaining health. That is, he is About recov- 
ering, and Brooks' Spool Cotton is the best. 



ACHIEVEMENT. 

Trust in thine own untried capacity 

As thou wouldst trust iu God himself. Thy soul 

Is but an emanation from the whole. 
Thou dost not dream what forces lie in thee. 
Vast and unfathomed as the grandest sea 

Thy silent mind o'er diamond caves may roll. 

Go seek them! But let Pilot Will control 
Those passions which thy favoring winds can be. 

No man shall place a limit on thy strength, 

Such triumphs as no mortal ever gained 

May yet be thine if thou wilt but believe 
In thy Creator and thyself. At length 

Some feet will tread all nights now unattained. 

Why not thine own? Press on! Achieve! Achieve! 

— Courier-Journal. 

EARTHQUAKES. 

The subterranean disturbances in this city, during the past week, 
taken in connection with the recent violent developments of a similar na- 
ture in Spain and other places, has naturally made the subject of earth- 
quakes one of large public interest at the present time. It is in order, 
therefore, to look over what is known by learned men in regard to them: 
Their cause has been, from the earliest times, a question of considerable 
moment ; and even in these days of refined theory and accurate scientific 
research, no wholly satisfactory account has yet been furnished. The 
theory which obtains most with geologists is, that water percolates the 
upper strata of the earth's cruat, and reaching the lower heated, or per- 
haps molten rocks and hot caverns, is converted into steam, the rapid 
generation of which in a confined place, and consequent enormous pres- 
sure, forces the super-incumbent matter up, sometimes merely disturbing 
the surface, as in the case of earthquakes, and at others belching forth in 
the terrible glory of volcanoes. 

The average number of earthquakes in all parts of the earth is stated, 
by authorities, to be 14 every year ; but from July, '75, to Dec, '84, the 
number of earthquakes in Japan alone was 555, an average of over 58 a 
year, and at no time is the earth entirely free from tremors, however 
slight. The highest velocity attained by any known earthquake is 9.000 
yards per minute. 

Sometimes their approach may be prophesied by the state of the at- 
mosphere. Thus, in Japan, they often follow a long dry, hot season ; 
but the state of the weather is not a reliable criterion. They may take 
place during a snow or rain storm, or, as in the case of the ever memora- 
ble Lisbon shake, wheu the sun shines brightly and all nature is appar- 
ently at peace. A gentleman, lately from Japan, says that he noticed 
before the earthquakes of '81 not only the oppressive dry heat, but a pe- 
culiar restlessness among domestic animals, incessantly moving, as if in 
an apprehensive, uneasy state of mind. Professor Milne, last year, con- 
tributed to the November issues of the Japan Mail a series of very inter- 
esting and instructive* articles on the subject ; and it is quite unnecessary 
to add that he is a high authority in such matters. 



A BILL OF PARTICULARS. 



Be particular about the girl you marry, and don't have too many 
mother-in-laws on hand at one time. 

Be particular when, like Timothy, you take a glass for the stomach's 
Bake, that you don't take too much. 

Be particular, when you get shaved, that you don't talk the barber to 
death, providing you yourself escape that fate, which is doubtful. 

Be particular, when you call upon a lady, that you bo act that you 
may call again without fear of being refused admission. 

Be particular about paying your debts, if you have any, and you are 
more than human if you have not, or else your credit is below par. 

Be particular about paying your doctor's bill, as the lawyer is always 
sure to collect his. 

Be particular about eating three meals a day, unless you are in love, 
when you can manage to worry along on a love letter, and a lunch every 
twenty-four hours. 

Be particular and subscribe for the News Letter. Read it, and keep 
this bill about you constantly, and the probability is that the Lord won't 
call for you before the right time comes. 



A cup of real good Tea is admittedly one of the greatest luxuries 
of the age, and yet it is exceedingly difficult to obtain — that is, if one is 
not well posted. Those who are well posted, however, use the Sunshine, 
SunBhade, Sunrise and Sunset brands, put up by Richards, Harrison & 
Sherwood, and are always sure of a deliciously fragrant beverage. These 
brands are imported raw, and toasted here by the new process. 

Williams & Norton, new Photograph Gallery, 914 Market street, be- 
tween Powell and Stockton, use the San Francisco Dry Plate exclusively. 



BURR BEDS! 



The Only Successful and Satisfactory FOLDINQ BED ever made 
No Trouble. Opens and Closes with Bedding and Pillows all 
in place. THTRTY STYLES— from $30 Up. 

HANTEL FOLDING BEDS from $15 TJp 



H. H. GEOSS, 

16 and IS Second Street, S. F. 



.inn. 81, I 



IU1.IK0RNIA ADVERTISER. 



SOCIETY. 



January 29, 1885. Oar frosty mornings have been succeeded by soft, 
with .» slight sprinkling of rain, which are the distinguishing 

feature* i»f the weather thi* WMkj ami the chief MDMlion hu heen a sort 

.1 oall from oar old Mood, the earthquake, which, after an absence 
of many year*, probably tearing we might feel the slight if he gave us too 
rang a go-by, dropped in upon us moet unexpectedly. While f^r Erom 
welcome, hie stats *li»I not prodaoe the alarm of former yean, and, 
though his calln were of brief duration, there were few, if auy, who 
wished t<> have them prolonged. Still, these visitation?* have been among 
the principal topics of the week, ami experiences, sensation* and 
reminiscence* of the great shakes of '65 and *08 have been going the 
roandi in every atrale linos tfondajj 

I have bee*i hauled over tlie ooau in several places for calling this sea- 
son a dull ore. Can any one truthfully say it is otherwise? Although 
on the surface there appears bo be • ffood deal of gaiety going on — in a 
email way— how moofa beneath the surface does it penetrate, and DOW 
many rtalli/ enter into any enjoyment of it? Therefore, I say again, and 
maintain it, too, the season is a dull one. 

On Thursday evening of hut week the Kittle-Tavlor wedding was sol- 
emnized at the residence of the bride's father, on Sutter Btreet, and un- 
der the circumstances was sa quiet an affair as it nil possible to make it. 
On Friday evening the third of the germane, under the auspices of the 
Crickets, drew a larger crowd thau lave honored either of the previous 
gatherings. The cotillion, led by Mr. Kd. Sheldon and Mrs. Collier, was 
uoted more for the number of dancers engaged iu each figure, than for 
any novelty iu their "get up." which, owing to the large circle of par- 
I i, was an admirable idea, and well carried out. 

Saturday was fortunately a* charming a day as one could possibly look 
for at this season of the year, and, as a consequence, the third hop and 
reception at Angel Island was one of the successes of the season. Ex- 
tensive preparations bod been made at the Island for the entertainment 
of the gnosis expected, and the number who responded to the invitations 
were large enough to test them to the utmost, the party from the city be- 
iog >till further augmented by one from Mare Island, which arrived al- 
most simultaneously ami was heartily greeted. Mrs. Kautz, Mrs. Bailey 
and Mrs. Wells did the honors, and it goes without saying that a most 
delightful afternoon was spent. Dancing was, of course, the principal 
exercise indulged in, though stroPs around the ground and vicinity were 
also in order, and it wa'< with the utmost reluctance that adieus were said 
when the time for departure cityward arrived. 

In addition to tbese may be mentioned Mrs. McMullin's dinner d'adieu 
at the Palace, Mrs. Utis's " party calls'" reception, Mrs. Collier's musi- 
cale. the dinners of Mrs. Adam Grant and Mrs. Lloyd Tevis, the Small 
reception given by the Misses Dore, and the song recital of Mr. H. B. 
Passmoie, which drew together a large and fashionable audience. Sev- 
eral opera parties have n'so been given, and Miss Abbott has again said 
adieu to her friends in Frisco with reg.et, though her visit this time was 
scarcely the social success of the first one, as eitertainments, especially in 
her honor, were very few and far between; so few, in fact, that they can 
scarcely be counted at all. Why is it that our society leaders as a rule, 
exhaust all their enthusiasm over a public pet during their first visit 
among us, so that when the call is repeated with every reasonable hope of 
a like kind reception, disappointment dire is generally the lot of said 
public pet, be they of either the male or female persuasion. It is sad 
that it should be bo, but nevertheless true. 

Last week was well filled with good things, though mostly on a small 
scale, but the present is another off one, in which little has been done 
in the gay world. Of course Tuesday must be the exception, when the 
military wedding took place at the Presidio during the day, and the 
dance at the Griffiths in the evening. So far, however, as the wedding 
went the gay world of Frisco was very little the better for it, as to the 
military alone, fell the spoils, and the civilians were left to linger at the 
gates (metaphorically speaking), and gaze with longing eyes at what was 
beyond their reach. 

The old Presidio presented a very gay appearance on that day, how- 
ever, and all the arrangements were carried out with a degree of excel- 
lence and precision only attained under military rule. Flowers and 
bunting were uted for decorative purposes in the greatest profusion, both 
in the chapel and at headquarters, where the recept ; on was held, and 
where the huge floral bell which adorned the reception ball was in par- 
ticular a theme for local admiration. All the military turned out in 
large numbers to grace the occasion, and the brilliancy of the uniforms, 
the beauty and elegance of the ladies' costumes, combined with the unique 
designs used in the decorat ; on of the rooms, formed a most pleasing scene 
to look upon. After the ceremony, performed by Archbishop Alemany, 
iu the Catholic Chapel, about noon, came the reception and breakfast at 
the barracks. Then the departure of the bride and groom on their honey- 
moon trip, after which the guests settled down to the more serious busi- 
ness of the dance, which was continued till quite late in the evening. So, 
take it for all in all", the old Presidio has not for long and many a day ap- 
peared in so brilliant and attractive a guise as on the occasion of the mil- 
itary wedding of the season of '85. 

Music and the drama were, and are, the other chief amusements this 
week, Mr. Mansfeldt's piano recital at Irving Hall coming under the for- 
mer heading, and the Romeo and Juliet travestie and "Tom Cobb" filling 
the bill for the other. For next week the Atherton party is, as yet, the 
most conspicuous feature, though others will no doubt contest the honor 
before the week wanes. 

Lawn Tennis Clubs, like Skating Kinks, seem to be on the increase, 
and another one has this week been launched on the community. I un- 
derstand, however, that this latest addition to the ranks is to be of the 
most exclusive character, and for no reason and on no account will the 
original membership be increased or added to. The skating fever grows 
more intense with every week that passes, and skating parties are now al- 
most as fashionable and more numerous than were theatre parties last 
season. They have this advantage over the other, that members of them 
can laugh and talk adlib. without fear of being considered the intolerable 
nuisance they certainly are to their neighbors in a theatre. 

Pretty, piquante Mrs. Floyd, who has been so much missed in society 
this season, has at last returned to the city, and her friends hope she may 



be induced to show soother, flight 

takes pLaoe to her charming nest at Clear Lake. The Bohmiedsll 

moved into uid are nttlo | -ettled in their new bomfl on Post street, 

whtofa waj completely renovated and done up in very tastsfn 
preparatory to their takta d, It is quite prooable, however, 

that their " house-warming " will be deferred till after Baiter, end it li 
■oaroely a matter of wonder that when a lady gets bet noose iu order 

that ihe hesitates about immediately upsetting it again. 

Colonel Joseph M. Litchfield and Miss s. Lissle 1'Vitch were mar- 
ried at the home of the bride's parent*. No. 1008 Green street, on the 
22nd. The affair was qufet, bat exceedingly pleasant. The Rev. Douglas 
Miller, of St. Luke's, officiated. After the ceremony the company, whit h 
inoluded only the near relatives of the contracting parties, sat down to ■ 
tempting dQuener, The couple spent the honeymoon at Monterey, and 
are now domiciled at the Haldwiu. 

The Fifth Grand Annual Culinary Ball is announced to take place at 
Saratoga Hall on Tuesday evening, February 3rd. 

The arrivals and departures are not numerous at present. In fact 
there are none known to fame that can be classed as " coming or come," 
while among the leaven are only the McMulHns, Governor, or, rather, 
Senator Stanford, Mr. Towne and Adam Grant, all of whom are going 
" down South." Felix. 

INSURANCE ITEMS. 

During the past week little of importance has ocourred in insurance 
circles in the city, but we note that many of our prominent General 
Agents and Managers of companies have been called to Sacramento, not 
on legislative business, but to attend the Superior Court, where there has 
beeu more than the u&ur' number of insurance cases on the calender. 
Until the law restricting companies to bring suit in the United States 
Court be repealed they are always sure to be beaten by a Sacramento 
jury, who is invariably in collusion or in concert with the counsel 
opposed to them, and it is with regret we note this fact, as justice, not 
friendship or influence should guide a jury in their decision. 

The cases late'y tried before these so-called juries of intelligent men, 
are a fraud on ie community, and until the law excluding Companies 
from trying their cases in the United States Courts be set aside, thev 
will always be liable to a verdict against them, as juries, no matter how 
patent the fraud or how unjust and infamous the testimony against the 
Company, a jury such as above described, will invariably grant a verdict 
against a corporation, and such decisions acts, not only as a premium for 
incendiarism and fraud, but brings discredit and suspicion on honest 
people, and in the end creates a disposition on the part of Insurance 
Companies to increase rates on such risks, thereby causing an honest 
aod right thinking community to pay for the fraud and misrepresenta- 
tion of the dishonest and corrupt. 

The sooner the General Agents and Managers will take this matter of 
repeal of the present law into consideration, and have their cases tried 
in the representative C mrt of the United States, the better it will be 
for the iuterest of the companies. As usual, there is an Insurance Bill 
before the Legislature, introduced by Mr. McGlashin, January 20, '85, 
and which has been referred to the Committee on Judiciary. 

The New York Commercial Bulletin reports that the fire losses for 
1S84 in the United States and Canada aggregated $112,000,000, or 
§25,500,000 more than during any of the previous nine years. According 
to the Bulletin 1884 was the worst year for tires the country has ever 
known, ex?ept 1871 and 1872, which the Chicago and Boston blazes ren- 
dered notable. It attributes the " wasteful and weekeniog " losses to 
" criminal negligence." 

The annual statement of the Commercial Insurance Company of 
California for the past year shows that during the twelve months its as- 
sets have increased from $436,373.69 to $443,381.05. The amount of losses 
paid since the organization of the Company now aggregates §1,133 534.80. 

Last week we stated that Mr. Robert Dickson was elected Vice- 
President of the Board of Underwriters of the Pacific, in the place of 
Mr. A. K. Magill, resigned. This was a mistake. Mr. Dickson suc- 
ceeded himself, aod Mr. Magill has not been connected with the Board 
for about two years past. 

A bookmaker witnesses in the street the accidental death of an ac- 
quaintance. He sets off to break the news to the widow. He is charged 
not to tell her too abruptly. At the house he asks for " Mme. Widow 
X. " '" I am Mme. X, " says the lady, " but I am not a widow." " Would 
yo.i like to bet on it ? " responds the bookmaker. — French Joke. 

They are trying in Germany to tiud a substitute for India rubber, 
and yet in this country boarding-house beefsteak is only ten cents a 
pound. 







*ffl> tf^ &/>°f ^ 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Jan. 31, 1885. 



SHORT STORIES. 

[From the pen of the News Lktteb Novelist] 

An Evening Visit. 

"And is It thee, my love?" asked A. A. Sargent, when M. M. 
Estee knocked upon the door of hie hotel apartment the other evening. 

" It istest, my sweetness," answered Morris- in a tender tone. 

"Then open the door and enter," said the Ex-Minister, rising to greet 
him. 

And the two recent candidates stood face to face. 

"What is it, darling, that bringeth thee out upon so large a night as 
this?" piped A. A. 

" I come, thou apple of mine eye, to mingle my tears with thine over 
the destruction of all our hopes." 

" And didst thou ever venture to have hopes, O lovely Morris ? ' 

" Alas ! I didst ! Did I not ever pray that I might be Senator from 
California?" 

" Prithee, my tender lamb, thou mayest have prayed, but the prayers 
of the wicked availeth naught." 

" Quote me no quotations, Sargent. It is not in good taste to chide a 
disappointed man in his misfortune. Art thou not also disappointed? " 

" Verily, Morris, thou hittest me in a tender place. I did beseech the 
throne of political grace that the choice of the caucus might fall upon 
my devoted head; but now, like thee, I am wallowing in the mire of 
defeat." 

"Ah, Aaron, my bright boy, the world will never see our equals again." 

" Noble man! I embrace thee. The sentiment thou hast just uttered 
meeteth with a responsive chord in my tender heart. Verily, we are sat 
upon, even as the big woman sitteth upon the small man in the Btreet-car. 
But I have my preference, Morris, and if it bad been a choice 'twixt thee 
and me I would have chosen myself." 

"Selfish knave! Know ye not that Estee, the anti-monopoli8t, is the 
peer of any Dutch Minister who ever drew breath ? Thou would'st have 
been a disgrace to the State." 

"And thou, poor, miserable piddler, would'st have been the laughing- 
stock of all Washington." 

" Sargent, I will slay thee." 

" Estee, thou canst not spell able. " 

"Cease this unseemly wrangle," said George C. Perkins, who came in 
at this moment. " Stanford bath carried off the persimmon, and it look- 
eth ill for such distinguished polers as ye to quarrel o'er the issue. I feel 
a little bidiginous over the result myself, but, begad, I shall not write me 
down an ass by jabbering about it. Close up your fly-traps and let us 
all take a friendly nip of good society in honor of the victor." 

This proposition acted like oil on troubled waters, and peace reigned 
once more in Warsaw. 



Why He Was Sick. 

"By heaven! this seeming independence maketh me Bick ! " And 
Clarence Greatman brought his fist down upon his editorial table with 
such force that he knocked the newly-filled paste-pot therefrom and upset 
the inkstand. 

"Goto, Sir Clarence, how so?" asked the court reporter, looking up 
from an article he was preparing upon the feasibility of Mandarin Chi- 
nese as an international language. 

"Marry, it maketh me very sick. Look ye ! For two long years have 
I run the Extinguisher on a yclept independent basis." 

"Yes, I warrant that," interrupted the city editor ; " thou hast run it 
on so independent a basis that every article ever written for it, having 
any point whatever, has been cast intu the waste-basket." 

" How, sirrah ! Dost presume to utter an opinion ? By my life this is 
insolence beyond endurance. Knowest thou, sir scribe, that there is but 
one man around this shebang who can have an opinion, and that man is 
myself? " 

" I pray thee, good Greatman," answered the wretched scribe, " let my 
folly for once protect my thoughtlessness. I did but joke when I said 
that anything pointed was ever written fur this paper. The only points 
the scribblings submitted ever bore were interlined by thy hand." 

" 'Tis well explained, sirrah, and I forgive thee. Henceforth be more 
discreet. But, as I said, this independence maketh me sick." 

" Sick! The great Greatman sick?" inquired the telegraph editor, who 
came in at this instant. "Now, may (!he shades of the Democracy de- 
fend us! Art dangerously ill, large man? Let me away for an apothe- 
cary. " 

" Peace, poor prattler! Hasfc lost thy wits? I am not physically ill. 
'Tis only in a mental sense that I did remark mine infirmity. Away to 
thy table. And yet," he continued, as the hireling left the room, " I 
suppose I ought not to chide the man. He did but exhibit a lively inter- 
est in my welfare; but his lack of perception putteth me out of patience. 
I repeat, this independence maketh me sick." 

"Bravo, Sir Clarence!" said General Walter Turnbull, opening the 
door and striding in at the moment. "Bravo! say I. So, so! the lovely 
Clarence is sick of independence, hey ? Thou dost remember the fat 
things of years agone, ha? "Tis well." 

Sir Clarence only groaned, as he sank into a seat and gazed helplessly 
into the face of Turnbull. The latter continued : 

" I wonder not that thou art ill. Dost know what such ' independence ' 
as thine is like? 'Tis a concoction of Buch vile nature as would sicken 
stronger stomachs than thine. 'Tis the false-hearted varlet striking the 
arm that saved him from penury; 'tis the viper which, warming into life 
at the hearthstone, stings with deadly venom the kindly hand that 
reached forth to rescue it from death ; 'tis the child cursing the mother 
who bore him ; the offspring bruising the breast that suckled it. Thine 
' independence ' is worse than the treachery of Brutus. Thou wouldst put 
a dagger into the party which made thy paper what it is. Thou pratest 
of ' bosses,' and bowlest against the men who spend their time, their 
money and their energy in preserving the organization of the Democratic 
party. I tell thee, Clarence, to thy teeth, 'and thou darest not deny it, 
thou art a hypocrite and a sorehead. This very day, thnu wouldst like 
no better thing than to dictate to the Democratic party of California. 
Thou art in thine element when thou can's! istue mandates and have 
them obeyed. Thou hast insulted the leaders of the party in this State ; 



thou hast incurred the displeasure, deep-seated and eternal, of every true 
Democrat in California ; thou hast adopted the rule or ruin policy, and 
well thou knowest that only the length of George H.'s sack saveth the 
Extinguisher from embarrassment, if not total failure. Thine independ- 
ence maketh thee sick, hey ? Beshrew me, but thou bast gall ! 'Tis not 
that, believe me. 'Tis thy coming downfall, which thou can'st read as 
plainly as Belshazzar perceived the writing on the wall. Such sophistries 
as thine cannot always be crammed down the throats of sensible Demo- 
crats, and the time is near at hand when a corporal's guard will be all that 
remains of thy once princely retinue ! " 

General Turnbull waved his hand in adieu as he walked out of the 
office, and Clarence Greatman sank upon the floor in a swoon. 

"The truth knocked our master cold as a wedge," said the city editor. 

"It hatb, indeed," replied the Court reporter, "cold as the day upon 
which Badlam got left." 

Exeunt omnes. 

GOSSIP FROM NEW YORK. 

New York, January 14, 1885.— Now is the propitious time when 
French masque balls and late hours are the rule in this great big Ameri- 
can city, that must needs import the can-can from Paris, with all the dis- 
sipation that the can-can necessarily implies. New York is very respect- 
able during the Spring, the Summer and A-itumn, but when Winter 
comes on apace, with snow, slush and ice; then it seems as if License was 
King, and Riot runs loose from one end of Manhattan Island to the oth- 
er. Only in Winter does the harlot and the mistress come to the front as 
the assumed equal of the Society women of the great metropolis ; only in 
Winter, when the snow and the ice, typical of the pure, made so by 
Nature's laws, iB all over, and about and under, as do the impure element 
of Society come to the front, and brazen-faced claim an equality — not ex- 
actly under the law, but sub rosa, with all the authority of the law — for 
every French maaqued ball is guarded most zealously by the myrmidons 
of the law, who dreamily watch the wassail, and gaze approviugly upon 
antics that would shame the living of those who serve the Devil. Scarcely 
a night but some ball. And as Joe Clark said to Eugene Dewey and 
Harry Logan, the other night, "I didn't know exactly where to begin 
and where to leave off in this great ball mixture, for, you see, 
there are German balls and French balls. There's the Arinn, they 
say, I must see to be in New York form. I went, the other night, to ab- 
sorb the French "Amtie " ball, and it came near paralysing me, but 
Dewey says that French ball was nothing to the Harmonie French ball 
that is coming, and unless I go I will be ruled out of the Union Club in 
San Francisco when I return home. Then Logan says I must take in the 
Arion, that's the cake, and Lounsberry said, the other day. he'd got a 
box at the Leiderkranz, which is another German ball that Hagtin and I 
must go to, or forever acknowledge that we haven't seen anything in New 
York. It will keep me pretty busy from now on until Spring, I imagine," 
and Joe wiped the perspiration from his capacious brow and meandered 
on. All the club men, society-men, dudes, grass-widows, girls on the half 
shell, intriguing widows and the demi-monde neceBBarily attend these balls, 
and some of the scenes which are witnessed in the sma' wee hours of the 
morning are calculated to make the cold-blooded looker-on ask if the 
world still moves on the axis of civilization, or does License rule and hold 
sway. Your 'Frisco balls are not a circumstance to those of New York. 
I hardly think San Francisco is large enough. To the square inch San 
Francisco by the sea cannot hold and combine the licentiousness of this 
city, and only on such occasions of wild revel — of unshamed and un- 
bridled vice — does New York exhibit its capabilities. But I will stop. 
When Joe Clark and Gen. Hagerin arid all our visiting Californians get 
back home, interview them on the balls of New York. 

The California Colony has been gratified to hear that James A. Rudkin 
has happily been captured by a Jersey heiress, and has settled down as 
the chief-manager of an extensive manufacturing establishment, of which 
his father-in-law is the backer. You know Rudkin. He bought a seat 
in your Stock Exchange ; paid §25,000 therefor ; took Latham's old bank- 
ing office in the Hayward building and lived— well, John Bradley says 
six months, and then went mining up in Alaska. 

I frequently meet Neddy Miles in Lower Broadway. He has been 
buckling on his armor against oil, and although he looks dapper enough, 
I have an idea that he got somewhat worsted in handling the commodity 
that is so liberally dealt out by the Standard Oil monopoly. Not so with 
Frank B. Taylor, whom I see and chat with every day. He has handled 
oil, the real stuff, for years, and has barrels of experience. He bucks_ at 
oil, but with some judgment. He makes money, but better than making 
money, he likes to fight out his old battles with Schofield and Tevis, 
and theclicque that finally drove him out of his California oil pastures. 

Johnnie Skae turned up, the other day, and has been keeping Uncle 
Bill Lent company ever since. He has taken up his quarters at the Fifth 
Avenue Hotel, and is complacently viewing the sights of New York on a 
consecutive basis. Charley Stoutenborough is taking a needed rest over 
in the Jersey wilds, but comes over occasionally to have a chat with qnon- 
dom California friends. It is the general remark that " Charley never 
looked better," and that his San Francisco friends will hardly know him 
when he gets back. 

Major Abia A. Selover, one of your pioneer auctioneers, still lives, 
moves and has his being. He is now interested in a patent gas saving 
machine. By the way, that reminds me that patent gas saving machines 
are all the go now, and it is a wonder to me that you gas consumers have 
not already been subjected to the visits of agents thereof. They will be 
along presently, no doubt. Among other Californians who are interested 
in the different machines are Col. R. S. Laurence and Billy McClintock. 
Your readers know Laurence well. He was a newspaper man, with ideas 
apparently too large for the Pacific Coast, and emigrated this way. Mc- 
Clintock, a jolly good fellow and an excellent mining secretary, ran 
Frank Swift's offices when Frank was a popular broker. 

Jim Nutn an, who used to run the Knickerbocker Fire Company No. 5, 
I see occasionally. He holds his own well. So does Don Carlos Butter- 
field, who had that little Pine Btreet unplesantness with John Sevenoaks. 
Vernon Seaman looks healthier and happier than I have seen him fur a 
month of Sundays. John Gray, who used t^ call for the old California 
Exchange, on the contrary looks down in the mouth. The world deals 
harshly with Ned Willet— formerly private secretary of Col. George 
Roberts. Moie anon. Occasional. 



.Inn. 81, 1 



OALIFOHNIA ADVERTISER. 



PASSING REMARKS. 



Bob Ingersoll u-lN an MBoriOfi itory of ad Irishman who, when cast 
.11 unknown Island, declared himMll "agio, the Government.*' Xhti 
iilii-ti : for which the larger portion of hnmanity cherish a 

profound aympalby. Gowernm nta in the paut have been habitually bo 
i ifamay, oaroleea or tyrannic*] in the treatment *>f their lobjeofea that the 
rebel against legitimate anthoritj very commonly receive* the nnqaeation 
Ing admiration ol mankind. Thw sentiment filters through aU the minor 
I of life, ami the " kicker " so called— the man who objects: to this 
or that or anything, iu fact— a a little hero, who is bound to come out on 
ton, I wish I was a " kicker." 

There ia a |>ictureiw)iie trip for all thoxe fond of walking, that hut few 
know of. Prom Port Point to the t'liiF House, iu continual sight of the 
majestic oooan. There are several pretty strips of beach between the two 

. separated from each other by high bluffs that dope down to tho 
waters edge, ending in rooky confusion. Over each of these bluffs runs a 
cow path, withiu a few feet of the border. The trail wa narrow one ; it 
is steep in ascent and precipitous iu descent. In spots, it is open and well 
defined, then, again, covered ami obstructed ; but it is full of pretty points 
d view that more than repay the pedestrian for hia fatigue. At all the 
rocky points that break the expanse of the beach's pure white sand are 
t dark and dangerous beauty, in which the mildest wave lashes it- 
self into furious foam over sharp edges of rock. All along are curious ca- 
i nature, arches, caves, weird shapes and forms, worn out of solid 
stone by the whimsical action of the waves. The path rurt3 through a 
rich vegetation, pretty wild flowers marking its course. The calm ocean, 
majestic in its placid oonsoiousoesa of strength, impresses one with a sense 
of nature's grandeur. The day is clear, and but for a few little specks 
that define the horizon— the Farallones— the expanse of water would be 
limitless. A few vessels are beating their way into port, their sails full 
s-^t, their signals visible. Above you, a little distance ahead, the Point 
watchman is spying through his long glass, as his assistant is hail- 
ing the coining craft in colored bunting. Small tugs are speeding along, 
with short, aggressive puffs of steam, defiant little fellows, conscious of 
their strength. A boat's crew, blue-shirted and capped, brave the dan- 
ger! of the deep, and row past with a long and steady stroke. With the 
tide, their pace is swift. Wait till you start homeward, boys ; that will 
test your metal ! When down on the beach, we espy above a young 

man, a mere outline on the face of the bluff. When up on the bluff, 
we distinguish with difficulty an angler or two, mere specks on the rocks 
below. And so it goes. Contrasts of nature, contrasts of life, of motion, 
o f everything. For as we reach the prettiest little nook, from which the 
view is simply delicious, we find that behind us at our backs, but a few 
feet away, is the last resting place of the unknown dead. We shout with 
joy at all the indescribable beauties of nature before us, and there at our 
very feet lie in eternal sleep those for whom not a tear was shed. We are 
getting to the end of our walk. Another steep hill to climb, a few more 
ids and nuts of shore to follow, and we are in the midst of a noisy crowd 
— the Sunday seekers for rest and recreation. 

A friend, with strongly defined decorative instincts, suggests that if 
Tom Cooper, in The Shadows of a Great City, was possessed with the de- 
sire to keep his old, striped convict's dress as a memento, at the risk of 
detection, he could have utilized it as a portiere without fear then of its 
beiog used as incriminating evidence. 

The authors of this melodrama lay stress by word and incident noon 
their opinion that a girl's majority is reached only at twenty-one. This 
struck the audience on Monday night, causing much conversation, and re- 
sulting in a general reading-up of the Code on Tuesday. I believe the 
matter has been rixed since- -the heroine's age has been shortened at both 
ends of that part of her life in which she is before the public, and the 
lapse of years between two of the acts has been shortened. Shewell, one 
of the authors, says that that legal proposition was never sprung on him 
before, I tell you we are smart people, we are. Clairbeau. 

Among the many announcements of exhibitions to be held in all parts 
of the civilized world is the novel and somewhat bold programme of an 
American Exhibition to take place in London in 1886, and though it ap- 
pears to savor of carrying the war into the enemy's country, there is 
much to be said in favor of such a scheme. The United States is still too 
much unknown as a whole, notwithstanding that certain States are as 
familiar to Englishmen as Yorkshire or Wales. The promoters of the 
proposed exhibition have already received abundant promises of assistance 
and encouragement from the United States Government and the author- 
ities of the various States and Territories, and from over 500 well-known 
American firms, who have applied fur 50,000 Bquare feet of space. 
Although the leading idea will naturally be to present to the English eye 
the industrial resources and manufactures of the States, in all of which 
labor-saving machinery will be conspicuous, it is intended to reproduce 
the main features of social life in the shape hi art, education and amuse- 
ment; while, as far as possible, the exhibition will present a kind of pano- 
ramic sequence, the visitor entering at the harbor of New York and 
progressing from the Atlantic to the Pacific sea-board. 

Pack's Annual for 1885 is a bright and interesting specimen of the 
best class of American humor, both letter press and pictorial, as well as 
in prose and verse. The yearly edition of this publication is now well 
established as a standard work of its class. 

The Mobile Oysters sold by Moraghan_, Stalls Nos. 68 and 69 Califor- 
nia Market, constitute a luxury which will add great attractiveness to 
any lunch, dinner or supper-table. 

The N. Y. Tribune's Almanac for 1885 is a perfect encyclopedia of 
political and other useful information. As a work of reference it is very 
valuable. __^_ 

Reliability of 22 years' standing. Midler's Optical Depot, 135 Mont- 
go nery street. 



BANKS. 



LONDON, PARIS AND AMERICAN BANK (LIMITED), 

205 Sansoui o Street 



Authorised Capital 

Subscribed Capital 

Paid Up 



K5.OtMI.IMH) 

'2,500,000 

2,000,000 

DAVID CAUN Manager | BUOBrTB MKYKK Sub-Manager 

Head Office. -9 . n i 10 TOKKNIUM'SK YAKl>, LOTHBC&Y, LONDON. 

A*-ent».-Ni:w YORK: Anna ->f the London, Paris and Aj 
(Limited), 46 Exchange Placo. PARIS: Messrs. Luard Freras&Cle, [OKueSb i 

Dmw Direct on the Principal Ciueaol the United states, Great Britain, Ireland, 
France, Germany, Russia, Austria, Italy, Belgium, Holland, Spain, Switzerland 
China, Japan, Australia, Central and South America. COMMERCIAL and new.' 
EL KKS' CltKDITS issued, available throughout the world. COLLHTM i.N'S MADE 
at current rates of exchange. I mud CEKTiEicATEs OF DEPOSIT and ra slve De- 
posits on open accounts. BULLION and FOREIGN COINS bought and sold. 

BANK OF BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

Incorporated by Royal Charter.— Capital paid up, 91,730,* 
000, with power to increase to $10,000,000. Reserve Fund, 1850,000. Southeast 
corner California and Sansome streets. Head Office— 28 Cornhill, London. 
Bronchos— Portland, Oregon; Victoria and New Westminster, British Columbia. 

rhis Bank transacts a General Banking Business. Accounts opened Buhject to Check 
and Special Deposits received. Commercial Credits granted available in all parts of 
the world. Approved Bills discounted and advances made on good collateral security. 
Draws direct at current rates upon its Head Office and Branches, and upou its Agents 
as follows : 

New York, Chicago and Canada— Bank of Montreal; Liverpool— North and South 
Wales Bank ; Scotland —British Linen Company ; Ireland — Bank of Ireland ; Mex- 
ico and South America — London Bank of Mexico and South America ; China and 
Japan— Chartered Bank of India, Australia and China ; Australia and Now Zealand 
—Bank of Australasia, Commercial Banking Company of Sydney, English, Scottish 
and Australian Chartered Bank. 

THE BANK OF CALIFORNIA, SAN FRANCISCO. 

Capital $3,000,000. 

WM. ALTORD PreNldent. 

THOMAS BROWN, (ashler | B. HVRRAT, Jr., Ann*! Caabler 

Aqbhtb : 

New York, Agency of the Bank of Calfornia ; Boston, Tremont National Bank, 
Chicago, Union National Bank ; St. Louis, Boatman's Saving Bank ; New Zealand, 
the Bank of New Zealand. Correspondent in London, Messrs. N. M. Rothschild & 
Sons. Correspondents in India, China, Japan and Australia, . 

The Bank has Agencies at Virginia City, and Correspondents in all the princi- 
pal Mining Districts and Interior Towns of the Pacifl Coast. 

Letters of Credit issued, available in all parts of the world. Draw direct on New 
York, Boston, Chicago, St. Louis, New Orleans, Denver, Salt Lake, Cincinnati, 
Port'and, O. , Los Angeles, London, Dublin, Paris, Berlin, Bremen, Hamburg, 
Frankfort-on-the-Main, Antwerp, Amsterdam, Copenhagen, Stockholm, Christiana, 
Locarno, Melbourne, Sydney, Auckland, Hongkong, Shanghai, Yokohama, Genoa, 
and all cities in Italy and Switzerland. 

THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO, CAL 

Paid Dp Capital 91,500,000, Gold. President, Daniel Cal- 
lnghau. Vice-President, GEORGE A. LOW; Cashier, E. D. MORGAN; 
Assistant Cashier, GEO. W. KLINE. 

Directors.— D. Callaghan, C. G. Hooker, Peter Donahue, James Phelan, James 
Moffitt, N. Van Bergen, James II. Jennings., George A. Low. 

CORRESPONDENTS.— London : Bank of Montreal, No. 9 Birchin Lane, Lom- 
bard street. Dublin : Provincial Bank of Ireland. Hamburg : Hesse, Neuman 
&. Co. Paris: Hottinguer & Co. New York: National Bank of Commerce. Bos- 
ton : Blackstone National Bank. Chicago : First National Bank. This Bank is pre- 
pared to transact a general Banking business. DepositB in Gold, Silver and Currency 
received subject to check or on special deposit. Exchange for sale on the principal 
cities of the United States, Great Britain, Ireland and tne Continent. Commercia 
CreditB issued available in Europe, Chii.a and Japan. CollectionB attended to and 
prompt returnB made at the lowest market rates of Exchange. June 28. 

THE CALIFORNIA SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY, 

X. W. Corner Eddy and Powell streets, San Francisco. 

Loans made on city and country real estate at current rates. Term and ordinary 
deposits received. Dividends paid in January and July. 
Last dividend, paid in January, 4.60 per cent. 

DIRECTORS— David Farquharson (President), Robert t\ Bunker Vice-President), 
John Bain (Treasurer), John Easton (Surveyor), J. F. Cowdery (Attorney), A. O. 
Corbett, Edward Farrell, Joseph R. Wilcox, Thomas Downing, Charles D. Farquhar- 
son, Chas. Lux. [July 12. J Vernon Campbell, Secretary. 

LONDON AND SAN FRANCISCO BANK, LIMITED. 

Capital, $2,100,000. 

San Francisco Office, 424 California street; London Office, 
22 Old Broad street. Portland Branch, 48 First Street. 
Manager ARTHUR SCRIVENER. 

Assistant Manager, WILLIAM STEEL. London Bankers — Bank of England and 
London Joint Stock Bank; New York, Drexel, Morgan 6z Co.; Boston, Third Na- 
tional Bank. This Bank is prepared to transact all kinds of General Banking 
and Exchange Business in London and San Francisco, and between said cities 
and all parts of the world. June 9. 

THE ANGLO-CALIFORNIAN BANK, LIMITED. 

N.E. Cor. Sansome and Pine Streets, 

London Office, 3 Angel Court ; New York Agents, J. W. Sol - 
igman & Co., 21 Broad street. Authorized Capital Stock, $6,000,000. Will re- 
ceive Deposits, open Accounts, make Collections, buy and sell Exchange and Bullion, 
loan Money, and issue Letters of Credit available throughout the world. 

P. N. Liliknthal, Cashier. Sept. 13. 

THE NEVADA BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO. 

Capital Paid TJp $3,000,000. 

Agency at New York, 62 Wall street. 

Agency at Virginia, Nev, 

Buys and sells Exchange and Telegraphic Transfers, 
elers' Credits. 



Issues Commercial and Trav- 
Nov. 8. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Jan. 31, 1S£5. 



PLEASURE'S WAND. 

* We Obey no Wand bnt Pleasure's."— Tom. Moore. 

For those who like melodrama, The Shadows of a Great dtp is 
a feast. It has realistic scenery, effective mechanism, varied incidents 
o" a physical nature, good character drawing and admirable acting- With 
LbtBa ingredients the formula for a successful melodrama is complete. That 
the plot is intricate and yet not original, the situations tinned with ab- 
surdity, and the dialogue senseless, does not affect the appreciation of 
th<<se to whom the stage is nothing if not exaggeration. If melodrama 
was still the rage, it wnuld be in place to moralize on the depraved taste 
of the public, but as the reign of such writers as Sims, Pettit and Harris 
is now tottering, it would be a useless task. A steady diet of such highly 
epiced stuff has produced a very wholesome indigestion, and the public is 
now indulging its grosser appetite in an occasional way only. Jefferson 
and SheweH's melodrama is fully equal to any of the works of the English 
scribblers. It is as ingenious in its appeal to the animal nature by the 
picturesqueness of its framework of scenery, by its sequence of brutal, 
fortuitous incidents, and by its play upon the simplest of human emotions 
as anything any of the English writers have produced. It has also the 
same contrast of clever character drawing and senseless dialogue, 
to be noticed in the other plays. The added interest of local surroundings 
is a point in favor of the native work. Why managers should have 
risked as they did in the last few years, large sums in the purchase of these 
English melodramas, when as good an article could be procured here is 

difficult of explanation. 

• * * ■* * 

The only cleverness of construction to be noticed in this play is in the 
arrangement of the incidents. None of them are new : but some of them 
have been unconventionally clustered in the last act in a rather unex- 
pected manner. It is needless to state that the motives and actions of 
all the characters are of the usual melodramatic extravagance, and if 
judged by common sense, would reach the superlative of absurdity. A 
few of the situations would be better understood if they were better ex- 
plained. The exact relations of George Benson, Tom Cooper, Annie 
Standish and the dying millionaire are not distinctly defined. It is not 
clear to most people why Annie Standish shouid be in the same prison 
with Cooper and Farren. The fact that Blackwel.'s Island is a home for 
both paupers and criminals is not generally known. The characters of 
Biddy Ronan, Abe Nathans and Jim Farren are clever sketches, but that 
of Benson is colorless and meaningless. No one uraspa Benson's motive 
in placing Helen Standish in possession of a position to deprive her of 
which, all the many crimes which form the play's story have been com- 
mitted. There are many such confusing discrepancies that might easily 
be remedied. The dialogue needs revision. In the case of some of the 
dramatis persons it is characteristic. But in its general tenor it is ab- 
surd. The scene between Cooper, Helen and Biddy, in which Co -per re- 
lates to Helen her life, is arrant nonsense. The constant slips of the 
tongue which make Cooper refer to his unfortunate past, evoke laughter 
from the unthinking, but the plausibility of Helen's not understanding 
them is, even with melodramatic license, too absurd. This bit of all bits 
needs rewriting. It spoils Helen, a character of charming naturalness. 
Barring a few lines of conventional heroics, there U nothing exaggerated 
or unnatural to this character, and a scene which requires that she should 
suddenly become bereft of all sense of perception and quickness of un- 
derstanding injures its vraisemblance. It imposes, also, a difficult task 
on the actress. I would like to have Shewell or Jefferson tell me how 
an actress should play in that scene. By what peculiar mental process is 
she not to understand the words, " My fellow-convict," spoken by her 
lover, and how is she to express or indica' e it ? 

* * » * * 

Hay man has covered himself with glory in the casting and monnting 
of tliis melodrama. With the exception of one scene, a drop used in the 
first Bcene of the second act, the scenery is exquisite. The acting through- 
out is admirable. Every one in the cast has a part into which he or she 
fits well. Lewis Morrison is manly and straightforward and acts with a 
touch of romanticism that is agreeable if a little too marked, Gerald 
Eyre has a character to play which is so poorly defined that it gives him 
no opportunity for any individualization. But he is easy and natural and 
emphasizes his work as much as possible by intelligent by- play. L. R. 
Stockwell's Jim Farren is a gem of characterization. His make up, 
dress, speech, and play of features, form ft, consistent portrait of a not 
uncommon type of petty criminal. But there is little unction to Stockwell. 
In expression he is hard, and the comedy of the part would gain bya smooth- 
er touch. To his many successful impersonations, Geo. Osborne adds an- 
other oue as Abe Nathans. This actor is artistic in everything he does, 
aud ^s ihe pawnbroker he is a realistic personage with all the traits of the 
race. Jean Clara Walters plays Biddie Ronan con amore. She feels at 
home in the part, knows that it is suited to her personal characteristics 
and utilizes every one of its possibilities with self-conSdence. In the 
name of refinement I enter a protest against the unnecessary realism of 
the coughing episode at the supper table. Isabel Morris is one of the 
most charming ingenues I have seen in many a day. She is simple and 
natural, cheerful and pathetic, in smiles and in tears, without the minut- 
est bit of affectation. She is pretty in face and figure, and neat in dress, 
aud speaks delicious English. Her acting is sincerity itself, and she gives 
uh a delightful bit of pure nature. She portrays two parts — mother and 
daughter— and in a delicate yet emphatic manner draws a distinct line of 
sentimental expression between the two. She is a most welcome acqui- 
sition to our stage. Following what is sure to be a successful run of this 
melodrama, Hayman will produce Three Wives and One Husband, and 
then Viitor Duvoiid. The company is to be reinforced by Miss Rose 
Wood and Miss Rose Bell. 

w * * * * 

The flattering notices which Mr. Mansfeldt received from German 
critics will probably euhance his artistic ability in the opinion of the gen- 
eral public, and enable him to attaiD a local prominence which otherwise 
would have been denied to him, bnt to some musical people they are but 
corroborations of the favorable opinion held and expressed as to this 
pianist's eminence, long Uefore his visit to Europe. Several years ago it 
was stated in this column that but for certain eccentricities of manner 
ai-d lack of tact, Mr. Mansfeldt would be ranked among the best of 



American pianists. He possesses a remarkable Fingerfertigkeit, which 
allows to overcome with ease the most intricate technical difficulties, and 
there is to his playiog a depth of feeling and sentiment that elevates it 
to true art. He interprets, if not broadly and grandly, at least intelli- 
gently and judiciously. When it is considered that he has acquired the 
solid basis of his musical knowledge by self education, midst the drudgery 
of daily toil, he deserves all the more the sincere appreciation of all 
lovers of music. Mr. Mansfeldt's playing, on Tuesday evening, was sit 
enjoyable that a second concert will be welcome. Of the different nnin 
bers on the programme, Mr. Mansfeldt was heard at his best in Bee- 
thoven's Moonlight Sonata, Chopin's B Flat Minor Nocturne and the 
Liszt selections. In the Rhapsodie Noso, his playing of the octaves was 
wonderfully clean. His interpretation of Chopin's B Flat Minor Noc- 
turne was poetry itself. The Mephisto Waltz, No. 4, is a musical co- 
nundrum — a freak of Liszt's. Campauella (The Little Bell) is a favorite 
number in the repertoire of all pianists. It affords players an opportu- 
nity of displaying the delicacy of their playing. In this piece, which, by- 
the-bye, is the second movement of one of Paganini's violin concertos 
adapted for the piano by Liszt, Mr. Mansfeldt was weakest. There was 
a brusqueness, a harshness of sentiment, that marred its exquisite deli- 
cacy. Miss Alice Dyer sang with her full, rich voice, three numbers. 
She sang Lassen's " Thine Eyes so Blue " with a wealth of melodic power 

that thrilled every heart in the hall. 

***** 

Lortzing's Czar und Zimmerman is a favorite opera in the school of 
light German opera. Its music is pretty, and its acting interesting and 
entertaining. Under the name of Peter, the Shipwright, the Tivoli people 
do it nicely. 

***** 

Emerson has withdrawn from the management of the company play- 
ing at the California Theatre, and the performances there are now run on 
the community plan. The singing is good. The specialty features are 
amusing, and the prices of admission very low. 

***** 

The extra Philharmonic Concert is set for next Saturday, February 7, 

at 2 P. M. The programme is a choice one. Reinicke's Jubilee Overture 

(first time), Chopin's Piano Concerto in F minor; Miss Belle Welton, 

pianiste {first appearance at these concerts), Schnbert's Moment Musical 

F minor, the Letter aria from Don Giovanni, Miss Sarah Kelly, vocalist 

(San Francisco de"but), and, by request, Goldmark's symphony, "Laend- 

liche Hochzeit." 

* » * • 

* 

The Dalvs, in Vacation, seem to have made a big hit. The success of 
such a performance makes of the position of critic a sinecure, for by no 
possible tergiversation can sucL strange work be considered by any rules of 
good taste, common sense, refinement, consistency or congruity. It pleases 
the public, and that is all that can be said about it. It is must be ad- 
mitted, though, even by those who laugh at the bits of amusing nonsense 
that are scattered through the show, that the character of the audiences 
patronizing it furnishes a sad commentary on the refined and intellectual 
status of our better classes. As to the relations of a critic to such a per- 
formance, the following article from a recent numher of Byrne's Dramatic 
Times is to the point. The success of the Dalys gives local import to it: 

"The Critic's Occupation Gone. — The occupation of dramatic critic 
is gradually but certainly becoming a thing of the past. There is still 
left on the press a number of men who can write good criticisms. Bnt 
there is no longer the occasion for it — nor the field. What, for instance, 
has there been to criticise this season ? Pretty nearly all our theatres are 
occupied with vapid, confusing, and professedly-funny plays — little skits 
which may be written by any tyro who has a humorous imagination. 
Look over the best of the pieces now running at the New York theatres. 
With the one exception of Victor Durand, where is there a play that se- 
riously appeals to any literary, dramatic or cultivated taste ? A crossing 
sweeper is just as competent to deliver a judgment on the pieces now most 
popular as a dramatic critic of the longest experience and acknowleilgtd 
ability. The only thing to decide on is whether these farces are funny or 
not. They possess no plots ; they are not written, but evolved ; they pre- 
tend to nothing but making the public laugh. Judgment on these pieces 
is only a question whether the critic has a good digestion or not, for one 
come3 awiy from such a farce as We. Us <0 Co. saying he roared the en- 
tire evening, while another avers that he never even smiled. It is, there- 
fore, no question of taste or merit, merely one of digestion and the humor 
of the moment. The man who must perforce sit out such plays ni^ht 
after night and week after week, who must in addition notice them again 
and again in some sort of a novel strain, is really to be commiserated. To 
sit in solemn judgment upon plays of the merit of Skipped by the Liaht of 
the Moon, The Private Secretary, Adonis, The Bottle of Ink, We. Us it- Co., 
is like breaking a butterfly on a wheel. A few lines recording the general 
idea of each, and one or two lines saying whether the fun is continuous or 
not— this is all that is necessary. The saving thought is that this craze 
will be short lived. People will never cease to want to lamrh, but the de- 
sire will not be well nigh universal, as it is at present. Beneath it all 
there may be a craving to get away from the dullness and depression that 
now mark most business days. These farces don't do much good, but 
they may serve to banish the weight of care and impending disaster for 

an hour or two." 

***** 

It is rumored that a concert of local composers is soon to be given. 
Selections from the works of E igar S. Kelly, E. C. Masten, H. B. Pas- 
more and F. Zecb, Jr., will make up the programme. Beauclerc. 

PHILHARMONIC SOCIETY-GRAND EXTRA CONCERT! 

At Piatt's Hall, Saturday Afternoon. Feb. 7th, at 2 o'clock. 

GRAND ORCHESTRA.! 

G. HINRICHS, Conductor, Assisted by MISS ANNA L. KELLEY, 

"Vocalists (First Appearacce), and MISS 

BELLE WELTON, Pianiste. 

^"Stats on Sale at SHERMAN, CLAY & CO'S MUSIC HOUSE, commencing 
WEDNESDAY*. February 4th, at i) a. m. 

Admission, $1. (No Extra for Reserved Seats ) 






CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



SPORTING. 



Yachting. The Carmalita la expected i" leave New York farthti port 
\\V villi bor » 'ii|itnin a pleasant trip, favorable winds, and above 

nil, a quick p.-utc»i;e. We ch»ll look for Mr. Coleman*! vurht 00 Jnn6 Ut 
n.-uhtlesa I0BM Ol OQI vac hl-iin'ii have already laid plans for a Buitahle 

ttclnmie. Oonniodon Barriaoo and Commodore Oaduc in making a 
iulnt effort t.» Moon a yacht harbor. Both gentlemen are energetic, and 

cactly what i* wanted. We ;ir< i-.mtulent they will leave do 
unturned that the turning may prove of advantage to our yachtsmen. 
W.- shall advise our readers at the earliest moment as to plans and pros- 

iu the meantime it is well t«< stir up all ymcbtsmen aa to the neoea- 
city of streinuum etTurt. There ia not at preaent a spot along the water 
front tit for the Beet to randesvons; there i.-* not a set of steps fit fur ladies 
to embark from, and no place raitable tor them to lain!. This is a dis- 
yrace, and the sooner it is wiped nut the better. The owners of the Nellie 
have decided not t » make any change.* in their fust and handsome yacht. 
She has held her own so nobly in these waters in her present trim, that 
they have decided to let her alone. The Chispa, Admiral (lutte, with a 
select party of gentlemen, made a very pleasant cruise to the ship-yard at 
IWnicia on Saturday last, returning to SaucelUo on Sunday. The wind, 

light, was by frequent consultation amongst the B&U(ors) raised to 

Me proportions, and the good boat was propelled on her course at 
the usual rate of speeil. Everything passed off easily and a^'reeahly with 
a single exception. A flight difficulty was experienced by the ntew(anl) in 
relieving himself of surplus supplies, although the crew showed no lack of 
appetite. No accident of any kind occurred to mar the pleasure of the 
The only case of sickness reported to the surgeon was a slight 
attack of asthma suffered by one of the party. This was iunneiliately re- 
lieved by a liberal application of the main-sheet. (This remedy is an in- 
ven ion of Admiral Gutte's; patent applied for). On the whole, the trip 
was a complete success. The cuests were liberal in expressing their grati- 
tude to the Admiral for his many courtesies. Long may he wave ! The 
-rounds of the Pacific Club are being well cared for. Admiral O'Connor 
makes weeklv pilgrimages to his shrine, ami keeps the gardeners well up 
to their work. A new hedge has been planted along the north "side, and 
it is growing splendidly. 

Bowing.— The Dolphin Club had a pleasant gathering at their boat- 
house hist Sunday. The festivities were wound up by a barge race, dis- 
tance two miles. The barges were the Garfield, Dolphin and Wieland. 
The Garfield crew had the worst of the start, and in making the turn 
around the ship which served as a stakeboat took the wrong course, and, 
although they reached home easy winners through this advantage in the 
turn, they were of course barred out. The Wieland and Dolphin crews 
made a dead heat of the race, and, as the Dolphin men declined to row 
again, the Wieland four claim the victory. The Golden Gate Club have 
arranged a match for its members, to be rowed iu fnur-uared shells on 
February loth, each member of the winning crew to be awarded a gold 
medal. The Pioneer Club is not dead ; one of its members proposes a 
race with Jackson, of Vallejo, for §250 a side. The Amity and Stockton 
Clubs will have a four-oared race for the champion flag some time in 
March. We suppose it is the champion ship of Stockton (?) These clubs 
have the finest stretch of water in the State to row a race over, and the 
only pity is that it is so rarely used. Rumor states that Beach has for- 
feited his race with Clifford. Petersen and Ganduar have made another 
attempt to arrange a match, and failed, as before. This time the New 
Orleans regatta is the assigned cause. We think the difficulty is on the 
hcore of the Almighty Dollar. 

Athletics.— The latest report about Kittleman is, that he is still here, 
and Lewis, the Oregon man, is iu town. There seems to be a hitch in 
fixing the match, but doubtless in a few days both men will arrange 
their plans, and we shall 8ee a grand puff in the sporting dailies to the 
effect that each is invincible. A sporting editor gravely informs us that 
football is dying out here, and gaining wonderful prominence in England. 
Both statements are incorrect ; there are more football players in the 
United States to-day than at any previous time. In England there has 
been no marked increase in the Bport this season. The reason assigned 
by the writer is that in England they play only the Rugby game. Here 
again he is wrong ; the Rugby game is very rarely played now ; it is too 
much and dangerous, but the Rugby Union and Association games are 
most popular. Evidently this editor never heard of the " Association 
Game," which is really football, and demands greater skill than the other 
styles of play. 

Bicycling. — We are pleased that the Park Commissioners have recon- 
sidered their action in regard to wheelmen riding in the Park. The 
present restrictions will work no hardship upon any one, and we hope we 
have heard the last of accidents in that quarter caused by reckless riders 
who are not under the control of any club. The San Francisco club pur- 
pose making numerous excursions this season. Captain Greene is a very 
active chief. Piedmont is a new point for our wheelmen to visit in com- 
pany, and to the Bay City Club belongs the honor of this most desirable 
selection. Twenty members formed line and made the trip last Sunday, 
the day was perfect, the roads in fine order, and the surrounding country 
looked charming. The ride was equally successful and enjoyable. Pied- 
mont will be one of the favorite spots for runs hereafter. 

Rifle Shooting. — The principal scores made at Shell Mound last Sun- 
day were as follows : Kellogg, 20 shots, 200 yards, 41 and 49—90 ; 20 
shots, 500 yards, 50 and 48—98. Johnson, 20 shots, 200 yards, 45 and 48 
—93 ; 10 shots at 500 yards, 45. Moore, 30 shots, 200 yards, 44, 48 and 
47- 139 ; 30 shots, 500 yards, 42, 46 and 4G— 134. Walthan, 10 shots, 200 
vards, 45 ; 10 shots, 500 yards, 43. Ranlett, 20 shots, 200 yards, 45 and 
43 -88 ; 20 shots at 500 yards, 39 and 42—91. The Pacific Club will open 
the ball at Shell Mound, when the members will meet for practice, and a 
general business meeting after the shooting is over. We again wish the 
new Club every prosperity. 

The Cow Boys, at Central Park last Saturday and Sunday, did some 
good horseback riding and displayed a fair amount of skill and exper- 
ience in handling unbroken mustangs. But no one went to see the show 
—a just punishment for the barefaced swindle perpetrated on the pre- 
vious Sunday. 



Fishing. Anglers Hod Rood sport iu the bay fishing for young salmon, 
Vallejo street il favored locality reosntly, At 

Tiburon, last Sunday, there was an enormous OStch ol flonndl 

lagoon was black with boats, and i thai went out ri 

with a well tilled basket. Anglers anlng to Tiburon on Sunday m 
complain of the delay in getting tickets at the ferry landing ban Iu 
tending purchasers of tickets are Dot only delayed, but set badly on 
and crushed in tryi thi the crowd after tbey bavs 

bought their tickets. The General Manager should look into the com- 
plaint and remedy its cause. Every day we hear fresh complaints about 
spearing salmon In Pap* r Mill < 'reek. This illegal and unsportsmanlike 

work Should 1>h put down by the strong anus of the law. 

The Blng. The glove-fight between the two Chinamen, on Monday 

Dlghti proved, as we said it would, to lie a broad fane. The OTOWa 
laughed, and appeared t" think they got the worth of their money. The 

tight between Brady and Whistler last night came off at too late an hour 

for notice in this week's issue. Sullivan is reported to he on his way to 
Australia, ami is expected to be here in a few days, We hope the 
steamer for Australia will sail promptly this month, fur we do not wish 
to he burdened with Sullivan's presence one hour longer than the time 
necessary for him to secure his passage. 

Baseball. —The California league announce the formal opening of the 
aeason to-morrow at Central Park. The 6rst of the schedule of games 

will he played at 2 P. U , between the Haverly and San E'ranoisOO nines. 
At 10 A. M. on the same day and at the same grounds, two of the I Vn 
tral Park League Clubs will play a match. These games have been an- 
nounced aud postponed for a month past, owing to the condition of the 
weather: appearances at present indicate that rain will again stop the 
play nn Sundav. 

Quail Shooting.— Tin* market has of late been poorly supplied with 
quail. Wheti the market hunteis lind a difficulty in bagging birds, 
amateurs cannot expect to do much. The few sturdy trampers and 
climbers keep their nether limbs in fine condition by long walks, but had 
they to depend upon the game killed to supply the demands of their 
Bppetitee, they would soon have, like Cassius, a lean and hungry look. 

Boiler Skating.— This fashionable exercise retains its hold upon a 
large 'lass of aoeiety people. The young, middle-aged and ancient nightly 
travel Ion- journeys on wheels. The three principal rinks are largely 
attended. The six-days' match is still talked and written about, but no 
date has yet been fixed. Once get roller skating into a money making 
swindle, and it will take but a short time to end its popularity. 

Duck Shooting. —Nothing brilliant has been done in this branch of 
sport for several weeks. Experienced hunters state that the season is 
practically over; but that chance favorable days may be found when 
good bags will reward the persevering. 

See advertisement on cover to know where to get the genuine 
Krug Champagne from Reims, France. Beware of California and other 
counterfeits. 

BALDWIN THEATRE. 

MR. AL. HAYMAN ... Lessee and Manager 

Every Evening, including Sunday, Saturday Matinee at 2. The Greatest .if all 
Successes! Positively Two Weeks Only! JctTureon, Shcwcll 

& Jefferson's Great Play, 

THE SHADOWS OF A GREAT CITY! 

Pronounced by the press and public the Best Acting and Finest Production 

Socii This Season! 

SECURE YOUR SEATS. 

BUSH-STREET THEATRE. 

Mr. M. B. LE A VITT. Lessee aud Manager | Mr. JAY RIAL Acting Manager 

Second Week! Continued Enthusiasm! " The Laughing Sensation ! " 
THOMAS A.-WILLIAM, .Tu.-KOHERT-DANIEL-LIZZIE DERIOU8 DALY! 

THE DALYSI 
And their Own Great Company, in Thos. A. Daly's Masterpiece of Ingenuity, entitled 

VACATION; OR, H ARV ARD Versus YALE! 

Matinees Wednesday and Saturday. - - Free List Ahsolutcly Suspended 



CALIFORNIA THEATRE. 

CHEAP PRICES— Gallery, 16c; Family Circle, 25c.; Dress Circle and Orchestra, 50c. 
Including Reserved Seat. 
Who Owns the Theatre? WE DO: 
Boh Slavin, Billy Courtright, Billy Arlington, The Electric 3 (Callati, Haley and 
Callan), James T. Kellv, Byrnes and Helene, Walsh and King, il. W. Frlllman, 
Ben Clark, Al Holland," II. Aver, Dan Tracy, Cass Downing, Orchestra and Bras3 
Band, and will give tbe Same Programme as Advertised. 
SOUVENIR MAT1NEK SATURDAY, at 2 F. M. 25 cents to all parts of the bouse, 
Sunday, Feb, 1— Motister Programme. Joint Benefit of Bob Slavin and the 
Electric S, Callan, Haley and Callan. 

TIV0LI OPERA HOUSE. 

Eddy street, near Market.— Kreliiiftr Bros., Sole Proprietors 
and Mgrs.— This Evening, and until Further Notice, Lortzing's Popular Opera 
Peter the Shipwright! 

(Czar and Zimmerman). 

Miss Helene Dingeon as Marie, Miss Emily Pozzesl as Mme. Brown, Mr. M. Cnr- 
nell as The Czar, Mr. E. N. Knight as Van Bett, Mr. T. W. Eekertas Chataneuf, Mr. 
R. D. Valerga as Iwanow, Mr. George Han is as Lefort, Mr. Harry Merjian as Lord 
Lvndham. 

"In Active Preparation— LE PETIT FAUST. Admission, 26c; Reserved Seats, 50c. 

THE GRAND PACIFIC RINK, 

Cor. Sutter and Jonea Sts. 

Saturday Evening, Jan. 31-WALKING vs. SKATING FOR GOLD MEDAL 
offered by the A. R. C.-J. B. BENJAMIN, of 0. A. C, aud E. li. BRADEN, ol the 
A. P. C, Contestants. 

All Next Week— PROF. W. D. W1LMOT, Champion Bicyclist of the World. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Jan. 31, 1885. 



SCIENTIFIC AND USEFUL. 



The Gull Stream.— Professor A. E. Verrill, of Yale, in a recent lec- 
ture before the Connecticut Academy of Arts and Sciences, at New 
Haven on life in the Gulf Stream, said: " Some of the animal life found 
off our coast has been found in the Gulf of Mexico and off the coast of 
Florida and although belonging in the tropical waters, was probably 
brought north bv the stream. The temperature off the northern coast is 
not so high as off Florida, but high enough to maintain the animal life. 
Some of these forms have found their way to Great Britain, and Gulf 
Stream forms have been met with off the coast of Africa. The forms of 
animal life discovered by deep-sea dredging are by no means insignificant. 
We found many valuable specimens, which, being of a perishable nature, 
we were unable to bring home. Among the larger specimens of the ceta- 
ceans, the sperm whale is the largest. It is a Gulf Stream animal, and, 
before the whale fishery, existed in large numbers from the Gulf of Mex- 
ico to Cape Cod. When first hunted, it was found in great numbers off 
Nantucket. Now occasionally a single specimen is seen. Another large 
cetacean is the dolphin, which is often seen in schools numbering^ many 
thousands and stretching as far as the eye can reach. The Gulf Stream 
has its share of sharks, of which there are several species commonly seen, 
but seldom taken. Of the smaller fishes there is a large variety. These 
are mostly caught by the tow nets. In these nets we catch the egg, the 
fishes just hatched, 'and part and full-grown specimens. At each haul 
between thirty and forty species are caught. Among the vertebrate 
animals, the flying fish is an inhabitant of the Gulf Stream. 

The Coming Comet.— A comet to which great interest attaches has 
been occupying considerable attention in astronomical circles for some 
time past. Mr. Hind, director of the " Nautical Almanac," furnished 
the Astronomer Royal with the probable positions it will occupy, in order 
that search might be made with the large telescopes at Greenwich ; while 
Dr. Backlund, of St. Petersburg issued an elaborate ephemeris to render 
its discovery certain at the earliest possible date. From an announce- 
ment by Dr. Tempel, Director of the Arcetri Observatory at Florence, it 
appears that he discovered the comet about G P. M., on Dec. 13. The sky 
having cleared, after about ten cloudy days. Dr. Tempel sought the ex- 
pected comet, and very quickly found an object, which he describes as a 
"foggy brightness fainter than Barnard's comet" (one now under obser- 
vation). Despite the fact that four comparisons of its position with a 
neighboring star gave discordant results, Dr. Tempel is " very sure it is 
Encke's comet," as his Amici eyepiece showed it much better than the 
eyepiece used with his ring-micrometer. 

Coloring Wood.— As a simple method of imparting to any plain white 
wood the appearance of cedar wood, the following process is recommended : 
Mix two parts of of caoutchouc, and one part cf caustic Boda in one hun- 
dred parts of water (all by weight). The article to be stained should be 
boiled in this solution for some hours, and is then rinsed in clear water 
and dried. If the desired depth of tone has not been obtained, a second 
b.iiling must be resorted to. This stain is said to sink so deep into the 
wood that even thick sheets of veneer thus treated will be colored right 
through ; while other wood articles thus stained may be safely manipu- 
lated without any fear of the original color of the wood showing through. 
Cure of "Paralysis Agitans." — Three cases are reported to the 
French Association for the Advancement of the Sciences, of immediate 
cure of Paralt/sis Agitans by means of hypnotic suggestion. The pa- 
tients had become unable to write legibly, but when the affirmation was 
made to them emphatically, during sleep, that they could write as well 
as other people, they did so forthwith, and retained the power after 
awaking. M. LiCbault showed specimens of the handwriting as pro- 
duced before, during and after the hypnotic sleep, and said he had 
obtained like results during seven years of practice. 

Removal of the Spleen.— The Gazzetta detjli Ospitali describes a case 
of removal of the spleen, on account of a chronic enlargement of that 
organ. The functions of the spleen, if it has any, are not clearly known, 
though an eminent physician recently said that its chief use seemed to 
be as a repository for the germs of malaria. In this case of removal, the 
patient shows no signs of inconvenience from the operation. 

Steel Balls In the United States.— The annexed figures show the 
production of steel rails in the United States year by year during the ten 
years ending with 1883, inclusive: 1874, 141,044 tons; 1875. 290.863 tons; 
1876, 412.41U tons ; 1877, 432.169 tons ; 187S, 550,398 tons; 1879, 683,964 
tons'; 1880, 994,460 tons; 1881, 1,330,392 tons; 1882, 1,438,155 tons ; and 
18S3, 1,286,554 tons. 

It Is said that one of the English railway companies is constructing 
pianoforte saloons, similar to those already in use on some of the German 
lines. These saloons will be large, luxuriously furnished, and fitted up 
with improved appliances for deadening the noise of the carriage wheels. 

— Court Journal. 

A Cure for Hiccough.— A writer in the Texas Courier of Medicine 
says that anything which will cause a man to sneeze will cure him of hic- 
cough. 

They are having an uncommonly hard Winter over in Europe. Cold 
weather and heavy snows in Russia, Poland and Austria have even driven 
wolves down to the Danube, and even there are nearly starved. 

The Automatic Tea-Firer, now being sold by Harrison, Richards & 
Sherwood, has abolished the era of stale toasted tea, which, when brewed, 
resembled fusty dishwater. Every retailer can buy one of these imple- 
ments and toast his own tea, thus insuring his customers a fresh_ article. 
Housekeepers should see to it that they get the benefit of this great 
invention. 

The most conveniently-located public hall in San Francisco is the 
Metropolitan Hall, situate on Fifth street, near Market. It is right in 
the center of the city, and easy of access from all quarters. The entire 
street railroad system, by connections, lands passengers at its door. 

R. Cutlar (Dentist), Room 104, Phelan's Building, third floor. 



AUSTRALIAN AND NEW ZEALAND NOTES 
The steamship Australia arrived in the Bay last Sunday, bringing 
files up to the beginning of the year.— The discovery of two Chinese 
lepers in Victoria has attracted a great deal of public attention. — -W. 
G. Brett has been appointed Inspector af Penal Establishments in V ic- 
toria.— A new Masonic Temple, costing 5100,000, is to be erected m 
Melbourne. Twenty locomotives are required for the Railway Depart- 
ment of New South Wales. A fine seam of coal has been discovered at 

Heathcote, on the line of the Illawara railroad, N. S.W. — -Ihe rainfall 
throughout the ColonieB has been unusually copious this Summer.—— 
Mr. F. C. Maynard has been appointed Chief Inspector of Public In- 
struction in New South Wales.— -Good payable gold has been struck at 

a depth of 450 feet, at Gympie. It has been proved beyond a doubt 

that a three-masted schooner named the Osprci/ arrived in Hohart in 
1848. The Captain's name was F. P. Comyn, and the agents were Burns 
& White, of the Old Wharf. She appeared to be American-built, as the 
planking was narrower than was usual in British vessels. 1 hese facts 
have been certified to by Mr. F. B. Campbell, of the Hobart Savings 
Bank.— The Hon. Mr. Swainson, the first Attorney-General of New 
Zealand, is dead.— Quite a large number of Germans are to be located 
in Western Australia.— There is a woman 102 years of age in a public 
institution in Melbourne.^— Her hearing and eyesight are both good. 
—The Christmas holidays in Melbourne extended from Wednesday, 
December 24th, to the Monday following, which was quite a spell of rest. 
—Recent experiments with the telephone demonstrate the feasibility 

of communication between Melbourne and Sydney. The management 

of the Victorian railways is about to reduce the charges on carrying 
grain from remote inland points to the seaboard.^— The Sydney Public 
Library building is about to be improved to the extent of SOO.OOO.-— It 
is reported that important discoveries of gold have been made in Um- 
bridge Gulf, in Northwestern Australia.^Smallpox is prevalent in New 
South Wales, and its outbreak in Queensland is fearei.— A contract for 
the building of the Fingal Railway, Tasmania, has been entered into by 
the Government. The price is about §45,000.— The grain and hay crops 
in the northern part of Tasmania were said to be in a bad condition, but 
a timely fall of rain saved them.— A contract for building the Derwent 
Railway, Tasmania, has been entered into by the Government.— Ihe 
price is about $390,000.— The officers of the U. S. warship Iroquois have 
been well received throughout the Colonies. The authorities of Mel- 
bourne have been prosecuting the milk dealers for adulterating their fluid 

with water. Hon. Joseph Docker, M. L. C, of New South Wales, is 

dead. The Government of Victoria will spend $3,000,000 in railway ex- 
tensions this year. — — The new Land Act is about to go into operation 

in Victoria. Property in Collins street, Melbourne, having a frontage 

of thirty-three feet by a depth varying from sixty-six to ninety one feet, 

has just been sold for about $3,940 per foot. Sir Henry Parks libel 

Buit against the Campeltown (N. S. W.) Bel-aid, has broken down. Ihe 
jury twice failed to agree. ^—Payable gold has been found un the John- 
stone river, near Cairns, Queensland.— A large quantity of kerosene re- 
cently imported into Queensland has been condemned as unfit for use.— — 
A new bridge over the Yarra Yarra, on a line with Swanston street, Mel- 
bourne, is about to be erected. The cost will be $7,500,000. A Colonial 

exhibition is to be given in London in 1886 At several recent sales of 

real estate on Collins street, Melbourne, the prices realized ranged from 
$4,200 to $4,550 per foot. The introduction of all nitro-glycenne com- 
pounds into New South Wales has been prohibited.— Sir Julius Vogel 
is suing the Wellington Times for $50,000 damages for libel. It is ru- 
mored that Earl Morley will succeed Lord Loftus as Governor of New 
South Wales. — — Two hundred and seventy-nine tons of wash-dirt in the 
Bingera diamond mines recently produced nine hundred and twenty dia- 
monds, weighing one hundred and ninety-seven and three-quarter carats. 

Pit street, Sydney, has indulged in a $75,000 fire. Queensland is 

about to negotiate another loan. 

Actually overheard at a dinner-table in Ireland: "The cause of 
throuble in our unhappy land is that the whole counthry is full of ab- 
sentees, d'ye undershtand? We shall have no relase till we're rid av the 
whole bunch av them, and as I undershtand ye're an American and a 
frieud av the ould counthry, I want to tell you, sorr, that wan half the 
lies they tell about us are not thrue." —Boston Commercial Bulletin. 

—Peek s Sun. 

Fruits for the Table.— Strawberries, Raspberries, Gooseberries Ap- 
ples, Apricots, Blackberries, Cherries, Currants, Plums, Grapes, Necta- 
rines, etc., put up by the King-Morse Canning Co. in superior style. 



INSURANCE. 



(Organized 1863.) 

FIREMAN'S FUND INSURANCE COMPANY. 

Fire and Marine Insurance. 
Assets 81,500,000 | Losses paid over. .85,000. OOO 

B®- The Largest assets and Largest Income of all the Companies hniliug from 
west of New York State, and writes more Premiums on the Pacific Coast tluu any 

other Company Local, Eastern or Foreign, 

li i j STA PLES President I WM. J. DUTTON Secretary 

ALPHEUS BULL Vice-President | E. W. CARPENTER Asst. Secretory 

MOMB OFFICE, 

SOUTHWEST COR. CALIFORNIA AND SANSOME STS., 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

Agents in all prominent localities. Sept. 13. 

PACIFIC DEPARTMENT 

LONDON AND LANCASHIRE FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY 

OP LIVERPOOL. ___ „„„ 

Capital S9.280.000 

Oash Assets ?'™4.875 

Dash Assets in United States 1,398,548 

BALFOUR, 6CTHRIE * CO., General Agents, 

March 20. 316 California Street, San Francisco. 



J.tn. 31, 1885. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



THE WORLD, THE FLESH AND DEVIL. 

( By a Truthful Penman ] 



Labouohoro **>■«, referring to the English .Tid^o editors : It \\m often 
noarrmt t- me tbnt the »ntere*t* of peace would be greatly served, were 
Jingo edlton end Jingu epooteri Formed into a special oorps, and forced 
itltdte the advance goard of all warlike expedition* they advocate. 
A few Zola diHcharKinK their a*wepais iu the faces of these smug gentle 
iikii. a few Arabs prodding their oareaieea with their spears, the Hies of 
the daeert tormenting them. Dad food or Tin food, pestiferous water or no 
water, fever and ague, gunshot wound*, shells bursting around tbem, and 
the amputation of an arm or a leg, followed by hospital fever, would — if 
I Jingo writing had to be followed by Jingo fighting — speedily convert the 
ootpourfngi of theee advooatee of blood end murder into the cooings of 
■OcUng dnvert. So long, however, as a division of labor exists, which 
make* it one man's business to advise fighting, and the business of an- 
other man to fight, we shall have plenty of people load and lusty in the 
former avocation, who, if, like the Mahdi, they were asked to go to the 
front to charm the bullet*, won]. I, like him, dream a dream. This corps 
of editorial heroes might fitly be supported by a tax upon Jingo articles. 

An Italian Duke lias just come into a fortune in rather a strnnge way, 
for it was through his wife's death that he suddenly became a rich man. 
The lad* had lived a quiet and reserved life, and everybody, including her 
I husband, Relieved her to be pnmirneod of only a moderate income. When 
she died, however, and an inventory of the furniture which had belonged 
to her was made, it was discovered that bundles of bank-notes had been 
hidden away in every conceivable corner, the net value of which amounted 
to over eight million lire. As she left no will, all this property goes, of 
course, to the Duke; but neither he nor any of her relations seem to 
know where tho money came from. 

Mr. Whcatlcy, of Leeds, England, applied the other day to the gas 
department of the Leeds Corporation to have his meter tested. This was 
done, and it was found to be 4 per cent, too fast, and a deduction was 
made in bi« gas-bill. But, instead of reducing it by 4 per cent, the Cor- 
poration only took off 2 per cent., giving as the reason that, according to 
the Act of Parliament regulating Gas Companies, a meter is held to be 
correct within a margin of 2 per cent. 

It le stated in the North British Agriculturist that three of the men 
who were engaged to slaughter cattle suffering from foot-and-mouth dis- 
ease, and belonging to Mr. W. F. Webb, of Newstead Abbey, have con- 
tracted the disease by holding their knives in their mouths. An applica- 
tion was, it is said, made to the Lords in Council to know whether the 
men were to be isolated or slaughtered. 

Rheumatism plays havoc with some of the female members of Euro- 
pean royalty. The Empress of Austria suffers severely from it, and has 
to go again to Amsterdam to undergo Dr. Metzger's treatment. The late 
Princess Alice was a martyr to thiB ill, and so is Princess Beatrice, now 
about to be married. 

Wo hear a great deal about the enormous traffic in Christmas 
cards, but the demand in Germany for Christmas trees is far more re- 
markable. During the ten days before Christmas 30,000 trees were sold 
at Frankfort-on-the-Main. 

Captain Rose, late of the Royal yacht, commissioned H.M.S. Tri- 
umph at Portsmouth three weeks ago, and she will leave early next mouth 
to relieve the Swiftsure, flagship on the Pacific station. 

SUNBEAMS. 
Chicago Socialists have been thrown into a state of frenzy by the 
speech of a Bmall boy who managed to get possession of one of their plat- 
forms. Among the heresies uttered by the small boy were the following : 
" Those who claim that lazy men will work when everything is equal, He." 
" A lazy man will always be lazy." " Tramps can get work when they 
want it, but they never want it." — Phila. Call. 

On one occasion a friend of Lord Anvanleycame for advice under the 
following circumstances: " Mr. has threatened to kick me when- 
ever he sees me in society. What am I to do if he comes into the room ? " 
*' Sit down," replied his lordship. — Malmesburtjs Memoirs. 

At a collection made at a Church Fair on the West Side, an evening 
or two since, a ladv offered the plate to a wealthy man, well known for 
bis stinginess. "I have nothing to give," was his surly reply. " Then 
take something," she resumed, " I am begging for the poor." 

— Providence Star. 

It is true, as Lord Coleridge says, that the "children in this country 
act like grown people," but then things are evened up a little by the fact 
that a good many grown people act like children, and half-witted ones at 
that. —Phila. Call. 

According to a fashion exchange, "the most fashionable evening cos- 
tume is a bracelet of violets worn above the elbow." We should imagine 
this costume would be more comfortable in Summer than during the 
Winter. — Hartford Post. 

Jones, who has just returned from Spain, was at the skating rink last 
night. Suddenly the building shook and trembled. " Earthquake ! " ex- 
claimed JoneB, turning pale, " Earthquake your grandmother," rejoined 
Smith, " a fat man fell on the floor." 

A new game is played as follows : A number sit around a table and 
write on slips of paper guesses about the weather " to-morrow." The one 
guessing right wins. Any number can play, as there is weather enough 
to go around. Boston Post. 

It is a wonder that firemen are not always taking cold, because they 
so frequently get water in their hose. — Texas Si/tings. 

Lack o" work will ruin an American laborer; but lacquer work makes 
a Japaneae prosper. — Lowell Courier. 

Do you wish to obtain seasonable Underwear and Gents' Furnishing 
Goods at reasonable prices? If so, go to J. W. Carmany's establishment, 
No. 25 Kearny street. 



INSURANCE. 



HUTCHINSON & MANN 

ITli-e mikI Murine InNiirance A.(gcn<:y, 
Nob. 322 and 324 California Street. San Francisco, Col. 

Capital Represented $27,000,000. 

All Lotsea Equitably Adjusted and Promptly Paid, 

PACIFIC DEPARTMENT 
THE FIRE INSURANCE ASSOCIATION OF LONDON. 

HUTCHINSON ft MANN, Hsmosra 

E. P FAKNSWOKTH f s l )ecm! Agents and AdjuDtora. 

HOME MUTUAL INSURANCE COMPANY, OF CALIFORNIA. 

OrU'tnln-d 1894. 

Prlnoipal Offloe 216 Sansome street. 

FIRE IKsVBAHCE. 

Capital Paid Up In V. S. Gold Coin) $300,000 00 

Reinsurance Reserve $200,059 76 



Assets January 1, 1831.. 



l7fi9,47S.M | Premiums, since orgiuiiml'n. *4,511, 827.67 



Surplus lor policy holders ?752|096.73 I Losses, sinco organisation. .$liy7:^09)i.40 

Not Surplus (over everything) $252,030. 9a J 

OFFICERS : 

J. F. HOUGHTON President I CHAS. K. STORY Secretary 

J. L. N. SHKPARD Vice-President | R. H. MAGILL General Agent 

Directors of tiik Homb Mutual Insuranck Co L. L. baker, H. L. Dodge, J. 

L. N. Shepard, John Currey, J. P. Houghton, John Sinclair, C. Waterhouse, ObaUUCey 
Taylor, a. Hun", J. S. Carter, 11. P. Coon. April 12. 

SOUTH BRITISH AND NATIONAL FIRE AND MARINE INS. CO. 

Capital, S20.000.000- 

Unlimited Liability of Shareholders. 

THE CITY OF LONDON FIRE INSURANCE CO. 

Capital, 810,000,000- 

THE STANDARD MARINE INSURANCE CO., LIMITED, 

Of Liverpool. Capital, $5,000,000- 

w JT. CALLINGHAH A CO., General Agents, 

213-216 Sansomo Street 
It. ir. SAIINTON. Manager City Dep artment. 

UNION INSURANCE COMPANY OF SAN FRANCISCO. 

PRINCIPAL OFFICE 416 CALIFORNIA STREET. 

(CALIFORNIA LLOYDS.) 

Capital 8730,000 I Assets Over 81,000,000 

The Leading: Fire and Marine Insurance Co. of California. 

JAS. D. BAILEY Socrotary I GUSTAVE TOUCHARD President 

C. P. FARNFIELD General Agent | N. O. KITTLE Vice-President 

G EO. T. BOI IKW. Surveyor. 

A JOINT POLICY ISSUED BY THE FOUR COMPANIES. 

Imperial Fire Insurance Co , of London Instituted 1803. 

London Assurance Corporation, of London 

Established by Royal Charter 1720. 

Northern Assurance Corporation, of London Established 1836. 

Queen Insurance Company, of Liverpool Established 1857. 

ROBERT MCKSON, Manager. 

8.E. Cor. California and Montgomery Sts., Safe Deposit Building. 

PHCENIX ASSURANCE COMPANY 

Of London, England, Estab'd 1783.— Cash Assets, $6,268,372.35 

BRITISH AMERICA ASSURANCE COMPANY 

Of Toronto, Canada, Estab'd 1833.— Cash Assets, $1,343,908.54 

WESTERN ASSURANCE COMPANY 

Of Toronto, Canada, Estab*d 1851.— Cash Assets, $1,357,326.39 

BUTLER dc HALDAN, 

General Agents for Pacific Const, 

405 California Street San Francis co. 

THE SWISS MARINE INS. COMPANIES COMBINED. 

Switzerland, of Zurich, Capital 5,000,000 francs; Helvetia, 
of St. Gall, Capital 10,000,000 francs ; Baloiae, of Baale, Capital 6,000,000 franca. 
TheBe three Companies are liable jointly and severally for all losses that may be sus- 
ained. Losses made payable in all tho principal seaports of the world. In the set- 
tlement of all claims under an English policy, these Companies will strictly adhere to 
the conditions and customs adopted at Lloyds, and submit to English jurisdiction. 
Juno 9. HARRY W. SYZ, Agent, 420 and 422 California St., 8. F. 

NATIONAL ASSURANCE COMPANY OF IRELAND. 

[ESTABLISHED A. D. 1822.] 

Authorized Capltal.$l 0,000,000 | Subscribed Capital... $5,000,000 

H. M. NEWHALL & CO., 

General Agents for the Pacific Coast. 

Ofllce— 309 Sansoine street, Sau Francisco. 



BRITISH AND FOREIGN MARINE INS. CO. OF LIVERPOOL. 

(Capital $5,000,000. —Agents: Balfonr, Gutnrle A Co., Wo* 
J 316 California street, San Franciaco. Nov. 18. 

Charles Crocker, S. 0. "Woolworth. "Wm. H. Crocker 

CROCKER, WOOLWORTH & CO., 

BANKERS, 
822 PINE STREET SAN FRANCISCO. 

("larry on a Oeneral Banking' Business. Correspondents 
J in the principal cities of the Eastern States and in Europe. June 16. 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Jan. 31, 1885. 



AN INFAMOUS PAIR. 

For something llks six months or more an obscure weekly paper 
published in this city baa been assailing the News Letter and its pub- 
lishers with scurriloua abuse. The articles containing this abuse have 
been malevolent in their intent, false as to any material fact they^ con- 
tained, incoherent, pointless and silly in their style, and perfectly inno- 
cent of any capacity for good or evil purposes toward us or any other 
perron. They were published, and, as we understand, written, by a 
young person named Henry B. McDowell, who, having inherited insanity 
from one of his parents, is afflicted with an intellect so weak that it 
broke down under the trifling strain of acquiring a common-place educa- 
tion. This young person was, during the period covered by these publica- 
tions, and is now, struggling hard to attract attention and establish the 
wonderful brochure of which he is thj head. In other words, he was a 
raving idiot, who, being possessed of a toy sword, which he mistook for a 
genuine Damascus blade, belabored the air with great gusto and thought 
he was annihilating tens of thousands of imaginary foes. All these facts 
combined led us to treat this continuous abuse with almost silent con- 
tempt. A gentleman does not impeach either his courage or ability by 
refusing to notice every cur which barks at his heels; but when a cur per- 
sistently follows one's heels with bis noisy demonstration for a considera- 
ble distance, manhood as well as comfort demands a substantial thrash- 
ing for the unmannerly brute. The News Letter, therefore, feels it 
incumbent on it to take this McDowell person, and those who have asso- 
ciated themselves in his enterprise since it was started, in hand. They 
have long been courting the honor of flaying from the News Letter, and 
now they shall be accommodated. It is a purely personal matter, and 
they shall have personalities until further orders— until avery_ child in 
San Francisco sees in them a practical illustration of the way iu which 
great quantities of vicious corruption may be hidden behind a hypocritical 
pretense of extraordinary virtue. 



The name of this obscure paper is the Ingleside. It was started some 
time ago by Pixley as a sort of sideshow to his regular weekly. It was 
intended to be a '* purely literary paper"— a story paper, in which all the 
amateur "literary talent of the coast should pour itself. The McDow- 
ell person took an interest in it and became its editor. A very short 
time convinced Pixley that there was no perceptible demand for this 
style of literature, and he dropped it. The McDowell person, however, 
fancies that he is a journalist and not a fool, and he persuaded his mother 
to agree with him to the tune of from eleven to seventeen thousand dol- 
lars—there is some conflict of opinion as to which is the correct amount. 
This money was rapidly sunk, throwing the paper around like a quack 
doctor's advertisement, in every house and store in town. When the 
coin ran out the McDowell person succeeded in getting a flash young 
man named Porter Ashe, who is now engaged in spending his mother-in- 
law's money, to join the enterprise. It is presumed that this flash young 
man's mother- in law is now supporting the concern, because it has no 
other resources that amount to anything. In fact it may properly be 
ceagnated a " Mamma's Paper " throughout its career. Its circulation is 
nil, and its advertising patronage is next to nothing, the little it has, by 
the way, having been obtained by means which we will afterwards de- 
scribe and which can scarcely be regarded as honorable. These are the 
two individuals who have assailed the News Letter, and in general but 
very violent terms denounced its publishers. They have set themselves 
up as moral censors. Let us see, by an examination of their very short 
careers, if they are not better qualified to be censors of immorality than 
morality. 

This McDowell person, as has already been said, was born with insanity 
in bis system, and has once developed the disease sufficiently to require 
restraint. At the present time he is, perhaps, competent to be at large, 
but he is dangerous in certain senses, because his weak intellect is inca- 
pable of controlling his vicious propensities. He has never, it is true, 
been guilty of any great crime, but that is because his is a petty nature. 
He lacks that manliness and metal force which is necessary to make a 
really great rascal, just as the sneak-thief lacks the grit and intellect of 
the safe-cracker. But there is no petty, contemptible, mean, dishonor- 
able device, subterfuge or trick which he is not capable of, and a man 
who possesses such personal characteristics is scarcely the proper indi- 
vidual to criticise other people. A few examples of the peculiar transac- 
tions in which this caricature of manhood has engaged, may not be out 
of place. We will commence with his matrimonial efforts. 



In person, be presents a grotesque appearance. One could readily take 
him for the result of a cross between a baboon and a goat. In fact, he is 
such au object physically as to be a constant source of merriment and 
wonder to all who know him. In address, carriage, temperament, and 
all that goes to make up human attractiveness he is equally repulsive. 
Yet in the face of all this there is scarcely a young lady of any means or 
standing — and he is particularly struck after means — this idiotic lout has 
not been pestering with his attentions. On one occasion he fixed his atten- 
tions on the hand and fortune of an estimable young lady, the daughter 
of one of our leading millionaires ; and having observed the lady treat an 
other gentleman with the ordinary courtesies of polite society, he con- 
cluded that the gentleman was a dangerous rival, and sought to remove 
him by a scandalous and untruthful attack which he managed to smuggle 
into the columns of a paper he then had access to. This resulted iu his exclu- 
sion from the lady's society. In one sense it is a small matter ; in another 
sense it shows the true inwardness of the man's character. The man who 
would debase journalism to such purposes can scarcely be described as 
anything less than an infamous blackguard. 



Another transaction, in which he figured in a very diBreputa ble light 
was a gambling affair. It occurred in a noted faro bank in this city some 
time back. Now, ordinary people do not visit or patronize faro banks, 
and surely men of extra morals, who are purifying the community, should 
not. Resorts of that kind are patronized, as a rule, by fast men, not by 
such strict teachers of good morals as this McDowell person tries to 
posture as. Being there was, therefore, bad enough, but his actions while 
there were a good deal worse. A brainless, egotistical donkey like he is, 



was. of course, an easy victim. He soon commenced putting on style and 
playing for high stakes, and was in due season burst. Then he borrow- 
ed, on the strength of his father's name and connection, to the tune of 
$10,000. This he lost, and when settling time came around he was found 
not to be a man of his word. As a gambler he was found to be as big a 
fraud as he is when he tries to enact the part of moralist, for gamblers 
always settle their debts of honor. The victims were eventually paid by 
the young man's father, because there were certaiu features about the 
financial transaction which, in addition to being dishonorable, had a de- 
cidedly criminal aspect. The point in the matter lies in the fact that 
real teachers of morals do not frequent gambling houses, and act dishon- 
orable when there. These incidents, in a general way, show the man to 
be an unscrupulous, unprincipled, dishonorable and blatant masquerader 
behind a mask of virtuous pretenBe. 



Porter Ashe, the associate of the McDowell person, is quite notorious 
in this commuuity. Some little time back he succeeded in persuading 
the somewhat giddy daughter of a wealthy lady that she was in love with 
him. The result was an elopement and wedding. After this the mother 
naturally tried to make the best of a bad bargain, and the young man is 
now leading a somewhat luxurious life. Upon the strength of his 
mother-in-law's money he is pushing himself forward into everybody's 
business with a vulgar ostentatiousness which is simply disgusting. In 
saying this the News Letter is not merely expressing its individul 
opinion; it is recording the verdict of the community. The fact of his 
having married the daughter of a wealthy lady is not in itself discredita- 
ble — provided he conducted himself in a quiet, gentlemanly and deco- 
rous manner afterwards. But when he starts in to force himself, so to 
speak, on the community, on the strength of his mother-in-law's money, 
he shows himself to be a vulgar upstart and a disreputable adventurer. 
In fact, the only thing he can be compared to is one of those contempti- 
ble specimens of humanity who revel in luxury on a woman's money. 



This brief sketch of the leading characteristics of the two persons who 
control the paper in question, shows the kind of men they are. He who 
runs may read from it that they are scarcely the proper persons to im- 
pugn any one's motives. Yet for the past six months, with a short inter- 
mission, they have been continually criticising the course of the News 
Letter. In its last article, the Ingleside intimates that those who pa- 
tronize the News Letteu's advertising columns do so through fear, ami it 
threatens them with the dreadful exposure of printing their names in 
its columns. The thing would be unutterably ludicrous, if it were not so 
intolerably and overbearingly impertinent. A glance through the NEWS 
Letter's advertising columns shows the names of nearly all the leadiug 
business men and interests in this city, and surely it is outrageous that 
these two disreputable puppies, who are scarcely yet done with swad- 
dlings, should be permitted to insult them by alleging that they gave ad- 
vertisements aB hush money ; thereby inferring that pretty much the en- 
tire business community has a bad character to bide. We say that it is 
outrageous, but we suppose that it will have to be tolerated so long as 
"mother-in-law's" money and patience hang out. Perhaps it may even 
be extended, for it may possibly be that the Legislature will pass a law 
ordaining that the business nieu of San Francisco must obtain the amo- 
tion of Henry B. McDowell and Porter Ashe before they will be per- 
mitted to insert a simnle advertisement. 



Looked at from another standpoint this advertisement business qi\es 
the true inwardness of the attacks made on the News Letter, and shows 
what a curse to the community these two vulgar cads would be if they 
wielded any influence. The News Letter's exteusive subscription list 
they have never seen and consequently its dimensions do not trouble 
them ; but its advertising columns are a continuous source of envy and 
wonder. Notwithstanding the continuous struggles of their canvassers 
their paper can't get any of this profitable patronage. They don't seem 
to realize that the News Letter has been established 20 years, that it has 
a large circulation, and that it has not merely a national but a world- 
wide fame; while theirs is scarcely a year old, without reputation and 
without readers. What they lack in the way of attraction to advertisers 
they would willing make up in those bulldozing tactics they are so fond 
of charging others with. Of this there is no doubt. The proofs are clear. 
Porter Ashe's mamma-in-law is now putting up a new house on Van Ness 
Avenue. It is said it will be a remarkable house, but of that more anon. 
In connection with the building of that house it is a curious coincidence 
that every person who has supplied material or performed work on it has 
an advertisement in the Ingleside, It is, also, another coincidence that 
with a very few exceptions — among them a dressmaker who is probably 
Porter Ashe's mamma-in -law's retainer — there isn>t a single advertisement 
that is not connected with the building trade. These coincidences when 
considered together show that if these two young blackguards were only as 
able as they are unprincipled tbey would hold the business and social com- 
munity in terror. It shows that if it were not for the fact that their 
knavery is so strongly crossed with idiocy they would constitute a terrible 
pest. 

The laxity with which business secrets are often guarded may be 
learned from an incident of the recent issue of bonds by the New York 
Central Railroad. When the rumor of their issue was first spread, Mr. 
Vanderbilt promptly denied absolutely that there was any such inten- 
tion. A Wall-street man has for his neighbor an employe of one of the 
large engraving establishments of the city. While the controversy of tl e 
probability of the issue of these bonds was in progress, this printer told 
his Wall-street friend that the bonds wore completed and ready for issu- 
ing, with the exception of dating. The Wall-street man took the " tip/' 
sold Central short, a nd made £20.000. 

It is almost incredible that London consumes nearly §200,000 worth 
of milk, butter and cheese every day in the year. There was a terrible 
outcry when the price of milk was raised in 1784 from five to six cents a 
quart, while in 1SS4 it was eagerly bought at ten cents a quart, and about 
six hundred thousand quarts of the fluid per day, more than four million 
per week, and about two hundred and twenty millions per year, are now 
consumed by dwellers " within the bills of metropolitan mortality." 




TOWN CRIER. 




OAI.IKOKMA AI-VKKTis,.;,, 



liege 



*' Hi»r |ht OHtrl" •• Vl.nl , , 
g«'*i ■ Mug in liU Uil u | o0 - „ - „ ,, 



1 • duibd with ■• |.,„|„.|, „ f ., ",.;/." ;' """■ ••■*"' ' •v.itnry r,„ na ,,ce 

»« ihowenrf apo,, h.'r i'l, :,-; ' ""' P« k ' " f yellow gold™ 

l,! '- Poww can whlbit B-. ^",. t Jf8» n «>«>dty which animag. 

" itc.™ M togtoDgawaV d™ "", h ?. , k '" *» ^nerooTS 

r. t ;d.K.» not concede tha 'hew. , II '\ ''"""onds "m your mtnd," the 

■OOld t.-el .oniethin- lik ,1. , UXk " " back "eat for anybody IT 

w «w ?£S« awSsrsc 

3?& to MESS* „ rt" e ^ "^ £ l^it 

^«Sa^*« d W B j S £. ab ° Ut r '° d "~ our Home 
Sod bless „ ur earthquake; te, 6 "^ 1 '™'^'^ other day? 
once a week for fourteen years everv time vo y ° U bad had a '"ture 
Mge^ continued Mr. B. to bis friend "Tn./w Ca , m6 horae Iate '«>■» 
"clock in the morning by a desultory .»n J /, kept awake till two 

SHI*- ™ earth Ae y , b t on 'en? welcZ^"""^ J T you w ™« 
loiah every time the lamp upset and' ?h» „™ i n1, and cr y Glory Halle- 
half.past one a. U when I,, , , *. t be WIndow9 rattled. It „., i ,i 
i»ba was saying *v2^&&*£*™*> «™ly. My SphC 
I can smell the tobacco ll t JIT 0n T , ame3 H en-T, but 
m.ght be ca led sudden and ^prepared like \™- t Aiat ?°" af ™d you 
hen the bed gave a heave and he e wis an on? 66 ' y ° U J Mak er Y J" 8 " 
up, and the old woman screame Too aD underground sort of a bust 
prayed like forty. AU™y!u afraid /f^ ""t feU on h « knees and 

3||Snr* *"*»■■•«•. a fte! abusinVyoi/Tard w Ca k" ed ^i? 60 and 
MgM .' Say your prayers, all yer know f ..M na . rd - w orking husband all 

">'' V^f* an °ther earthquake l"ok«Hol ,?,n6 | at tb ? lod « e - Hurry 
J ham t had nary a lecture sinee th, i • ", lve here in ten minutes 



Chief E „ glneer Melvme «-pensation of Providence.' 

the America^ PeoplflnThtchTel^eMhe'bTf 7?" 3D add ™ '° 
now ripe for the making of •, «„,i . i the belief that " the time is 

f"' 6 ' .** ^^ni.iSfaSti h .h.i" 90 „l^^ 1 V0 ?« e 1 . to '>'» North 
a «K^^ 

not the cognomen afoBMo^fiSSKSS ^Mp*^) Ho£? 

D. Kaved Fitch, not the titl of A Givemh S' 5° tbe a KP el '»«on of 
blazon across the frigid cliffs that mark Z .ni ' 6rC6 ! but that J"" 
he nommality of H. Bragelonne McBote 1 « p", 06 l ° Sy "? mes ' H °le 
vilie, "like their faces are »!«,„,„ • , , *° ' 8 names," Mr Mel 

the most hopeless and hideous M^S X wouTd"'- K'r 8 '" bui « "fy 
the ngid rocks of the Arctic The T ?• h, 18 ° h ' 8 naaie P ai "'ed on 

above exhibition of Ubeled iSa^^ 

gSE IWfittSSS!*^ «* , ™e * a. as an in- 

ling and glad to concede to all ereat ?„ f J0 , Urna1 ' are "hundantly w,° 
which justly belongs to them ; g but ne ihe?ihT ^ 6 meed of P rai e 
LETTER can tolerate " slobbering" tK H 1 a nor the News 
bibitions of spittle spewiZ of &» „ '5 6re have been several ex- 
will learn with surprise ft is h ,,►' r6ad . e , r of th e daily newspape™ 
FWd will be arfecte P d when he readsTb^Inn' 6 , J .!." ppo ' e ' tb al Judge 
^.'toof the 28th inst.; certainly all o?her re»H ° y pHnted in tDe 

distinguished jurist, that papef says . ' In .f 8 , W6re - deferring to the 
all others; in scholarship, advanced b'evonc ? a ^ ate , smaDa .hip, greater than 
th L nstruo ' or o f ^ others; a* a ltSl sfed 11 ■ "m ; In i u ™P™dence, 
the bar and hitting the anvil at eve°rv blow 8 -' 6lder ' ouUin * th ™UKh 
highest up the graceful bend of the rairTh^ ' ' f l * a % P 1 ^ 8 ' fl o at ing 
•'reogth o sight be needed, flaehin- for S J '.i?";^' 11 ', " power aDd 
of heaven ' Neighbor ,1,'fa/you are" U rol»hlt 'J . tbe electric currents 
and wish him well ; but in the name of sens^/ fr ' 6n - d of Jud = e F ield 
him to death with flattery. 8en3e and P r opnety, do not choke 

£yt p t m^li o fi L t ^ 6 hfb y abL o o^L^rut^ E b h,y p T ad6s a » <— « 

S^d 6 a q n7 w Sun7ru h nlr^^^^^ 

keep and whisperingto Sta ^ ""ierribTv offW ° f - fc 1 ^^"* the bar 
a drink." But on the contrary he 8a vs' I -'"' r" 6 , b i roke ; « im ' me 
nIw° g Vu and ! f I "member St I orXred somTf. ■ M Ied excite d 1«' 
pay for them." " In the miin ™. oraered s °mf drinks here and did not 

jerker; "you ordered ZnTdidZ SS reR ii 6S , the "udite beer 
a dessicated condition. Partake of » m» f V ? ne ? dful > and departed in 
dog which has bitten hefand ' visft th?s ^ "^ bair ot the a l'egorica1 



r-'r- ".••«•„,;'; '".'-■•■■"• ""lik- that t....lil" ,v..f „:.„'■ 

tbi.soionionlV^! 1 :,;;;-:?::, ;^-'''"'-' Sk^i^S 

they would walk ., „,/,"« «»» prworioed in th,i r 

or, iinpli,, liberty „f iSta^'SSA^ftfi: ''""l'' W - *S 

'"•"-•In hence, it follow, that If 15, p3 ."',.'"""". Includw libel 
ten » ,,o„„ n j, , fctah ' l | r olo. heorv U oorreot, l;.-v. ■„, 

««»t?» « infidels an b.r]o2tt!S5 i '." J*?"" »«« '" think f 

aho Painful to , i,,,,,.],,, ,,,, " r ""«h the tndol,enoeof liberty -it f. 

%», f restriction. & %i rtd.".^ 1 !!!*'" '""' defopmiUe. b5 

the blackguard star, who r'tTect the ,?lo Ce m " a 7- f V n, ' ma ' !,f ""d for a 
likes to travel as a show ,l,\ the ,*>' lor y of this blackguard sun ui 
then keep drunk : foVth^e mo^£. BOC | u Y,?l ,b,,dl : f '" ''"- ' " "d» and 
s "llivan convalescent bellows for V„ bull,van «ck squeals for a priest 
cann ot b far distant when the bulliC n w, W , I,e E the *"* «»«. " l"=h' 
sef-.ndulgence, then thank g,„dL 8W e 8 h V h haVe ""^"'hed to hi 
bully except in police circles. ha " hear Mm « of the brawny 

At the Cosmos Ci ii h i \ ' 
coast, which is ret,dled at the re mode 8 t'n a L 8a ; d S ^ be ""equaled on the 
During the election excitement "here met at .°h ffS" 10 °- " r M e. each? 
^d er , "It VPOrting medfeo of Oaktnd th Th' Ul ' a P"\minent 'Frisco 
asked by the M. D. to bring "one of thi , ni • ," ,? ward Oomiog, was 
tpo,"said the lawyer. "But P„1„„.i « e - . B l a . lne "• " Br 'ng me Z7 
the jurist never smoked-meely chew 'n^ bi 1 f 7 e " d - whn k'.^w that 
you know that a Blaine coFta^onVbfteT* «tE,V ■?"- U ", lil d gar-"d, 
answer, "Bring me a • Butler,- steward ; ^ ^''a 's'htt" bit^ ^ 

?£S h ". «" »•» 8 ? much songnfaTer";. t^?'' " f «%- G«.,|, 



ing extraordinary item : " Invitati, .„ t a 'ih7TJtlt "," a ^ ,s the follow. 
Smytbe are now so much sought after thar „h V' 6 ' 1 " f M,8 » «euevieve 

wllfh U mak . 6 them transferable The fa be ilJ a3 h S6V - e !' al *S m b >*» 
wil hold out about three weeks yet before «„« -ii Phy 8101 *" thinks she 
saymg farewell to her friends, bu^ • we hope not "'V,™ 6 "'0 .Pleasure of 
the upper country seems to hive generated , . Th , e 8now "loekade in 

amu8 emento; butasan invitation <™vou t lv t„y ° rt8 °, f T W a,ld 8tart| i"s 
a death-bed certainly stands unrivaled W ' 8bed a Carfa ""'«''< t« 

llSS^^*5lb3taffii be » us!cal "'ticism 

the gifted scribe gravely informed h " raanwS 9^"" cle «osntly, when 
bly certain words which the tenor »„„„„" tbat tbere are "nnuostiona. 
believe there are. Such words as ?Crilfel n „1 U T °S f? a hi «" C We 
and "incomprehensibility," are "ry'irvln- ? P P ™' """PoloeStic," 
and even Wachtel finds it imposslbl? toS Vhf °"°", DCe on J tbe bi sh C, 
koff at that altitude ; but then Wachtel hJ„ """"^ W , ord " **"&■ 
he never sings about the Chronicle mzo De6d '° be a ' a ™ed, for 

Th^r/nd %*%:% "gftr* ^ c^ rt th . Bftldlvin 

Petaluma, is delighted with the piece Mr C "' eXCept . old Cuffey, of 
his leg in San Francisco bv 1(1 candle now*; 8ay l ev " si nce he broke 
feet contempt for the shadows of any citv ^i'f' H h ™ bad a P«" 
darned play, anyhow, ia just a job Tnut^n & be bel,evea that the 

the streets dark and the price of gaf up P y 80me cor Poi-ation to keep 

Baltimore on Tuesday, but, according to the nf an Pald a vi8it to 
mediately after witnessing KistoriV. impersonat; P % W t8 ' " left ■■»■ 
This is tough on Ristori\ but it enconra™ J t u of Marie Stuart.'" 

eventual recovery. '"encourages a strong hope of McCullough's 

Judge Hoffman has decided th«t ru,.- 
United States upon certificates i sued by "1?^?,"°- ^ t ^ ltM to tb e 
Thus , s a new industry of buddinc tinani it r fore, « n "--.home Consuls, 
fully. It is feared that Consuls wiM be driveL P „7T ^ PPed unmerti 
ness in order to eke out opulence nt0 tbe absconding busi- 

fro^rpu^^th^rn'S^kln'lan^^m *?,'"«*# a "d 

in due time. Uses w,n be found for dudes and mashers 

^pretediSt^obe^u^H^-- 

ftp. SuJT TVe hi r.t y re h c a om'n1ends > ?h V ifth ° f "P?? » J " d - 
a? Xh. " berty - T ° be d6af a " d dumb'an^ata'rr wFll t™^ 

a Sat1ng a tid l o^ t ^^ r d ^ D h ^a f„ e mb n at a ant d w y ^f""" ° D a — " of 

?Ms°rme„se h6 M ^? ^A Sfi S 

defcefdirtf1hr^f? a m1,; Wa i^tL d :a„ 8 a OD ,T* tb6 A »"»- 
comeinforashare.tbe^r^iUbeverysma 8 !! 8easb ore are to 

Oregon, was seen to take a pinch of snuT Senator Dolpb ' °f 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Jan. 31, lit 5 



C. P. R . R. 

Trains Leave, ami nre f)ne to Arrive at, 
SAN FRANCISCO. 



LEAVE 
(for; 


From Jan. 4, 1885. j 


ARRIVE 

(from) 






•10:10 A. 


•4:00 p. 




6:40 p. 






5.40 p. 


8:00 a. 


Delta, Redding and Portland 


6:40 p. 


•3:30 p. 




"10:40 a. 


7:30 a. 


.... lone via Livermore 


5:40 p. 


4:00 p. 




10:10 A. 


•5:00 p. 




•8.40 A. 


3:30 p. 


. . j Mojave, Deming, 1 Express 

. . 1 El Paso and East. ) Emigrant 


10:40 A. 


7:00 p. 




10:00 a. 




3:40 p. 


3:00 p. 


. . J Ogden and East 1 Express 

,.( " " (Emigrant 


11:10 a. 


7:00 p. 


9:40 A. 






5:40 p. 


7:30 a. 










6:40 p. 


3:00 P. 


" via Benieia 


11:10 a. 


4:00 p. 


" via Benicia 


10:10 A. 


•4:00 p. 


Sacramento River Steamers 


•6:00 A. 


7:30 A. 


....San Jose 


•3:40 p. 




" 


t3:40 p. 


3:00 p. 


" ..... 


9:40 A. 


7 30A. 


Stockton via Livermore 


5:40 P. 


"3: <0 P. 


.... " via Martinez 


•10:40 A. 


'S>:30 a. 


.... Tulare anu Fresno 


<7:40P. 



A for Morning. 



i* for Afternoon. 



From "SAN FRANCISCO," Daily. 

To EAST OAKLAND-«6:00, *6:30, 7:00, 7:30, 8:00, 
8:30,9:00. 9:30, 10:00, 10:30, 11:00, 11:30, 12:00, 12:30, 
1:00, 1:30, 2:00, 2:30, 3:00, 3:30, 4:00, 4:30, 5:00, 5:30, 
6:00, 6:30, 7:00, 8:00, 9:00, 10:00, 11:00, *12:00. 

To FRUIT VALE— '0:00, *6:30, *7:00, *7:30, *S:00, '8:30, 
-3:30, *4:00, *4:30, *5:00, *5:30, *6:00, *6:30, 9:00. 

To FRUIT VALE (via Alameda)— "9:30, 6:30, } 11:00, 
* 12:00. 

To ALAMEDA— *6:00, *6:30, 7:00, '7:30, 8:00, "8:30, 9:00, 
9:30,10:00, J10:30, 11:00, $11:30, 12:00, tl2:30, 1:00, 
tl:30, 2:00, 3:00, 3:30, 4:00, 4:30, 5:00, 5:30, 6:00, 6:30, 
7:00, 8:00, 9:00, 10:00, 11:00, *12:00. 

To BERKELEY — *6:00, *6:30, 7:00, '7:30, 8:00, *8:30, 
9-00, 19:30, 10:00, tl0:30, 11:00, 1 11:30, 12:00, 1:00, 
2:00, 3:00, 4:00,4-30,5:00, 6:30,6:00, 6:30,7:00,8:00, 
9:00, 10:00, 11:00, *12:00. 

To WEST BERKELEY— *6:00, *6:30, 7:00, «7:S0, 18:00, 
•8:30, 9:00, 10:00, 11:00, 11:00, 2:00, 3:00, 4:00, *4:30, 
5:00, *5:30, 6:00, ^6:30, 7:00. 

To "SAN FRANCISCO," Dally. 

From FRUIT VALE— *6:23, *6:53, *7:23, •■''7:53, #8:23, 
*8:63,*9:23, "10:21, *4:2S, *4:53, "5:23, *6:53, "6:23, 
"6:53,7:25, 9:50. 

From FRUIT VALE (via Alameda)— '5:15, '5:45, t6:45, 
19:15, *3:16. 

From EAST OAKLAND-* 5:30, *6:00. 6:30, 7:00, 7:30, 
8:00,8:30, 9:00, 9:30,10:00, 10:30, 11:00, 11:30, 12:00, 
12:30, 1:00, 1:30, 2:00, 2:30, 3:00, 3:30, 4:00, 4:30, 5:00, 
5:30, .i:u0, 6:30, 7:00, 7:57, 8:57, 9:57, 10:57. 

From BROADWAY. Oakland 7 minutea later than 
from East Oakland. 

From ALAMEDA— *5:22, *6:62, "6:22, 6:52, '7:22, 7:52, 
'8:22, 8:52, 9:22, 9:52, U0:22, 10:52, 111:22, 11:52, 
112:22,12:52,11:22, 1:52, 2:52, 3:22, 3:52, 4:22, 4:52, 
6:22, 6:52, 6:22, 6:52, 7:52, 8:52, 9:52, 10:62. 

From BERKELEY— *5:15, *5:46, *6:15, 6:45, *7:15, 7:45, 
•8:15, 8:45, 19:16, 9:45, $10:15, 10:45, $11:15, 11:45, 
12:45, 1:45, 2:45, 3:45, 4:15, 4:45, 6:15, 5:45,6:15, 6:45, 
7:45, S:45, 9:45, 10:45. 

From WEST BERKELEY — *5:45, *6:15, 6:45, *7:15, 
7:45, 8:45, $9:16, 9:46, 10:45, $12:45, 1:45, 2:45, 3:45, 
4:46, *5:15, 6:45, *6:16, 6:45, *7:15. 



Creefe Route. 

From SAN FRANCISCO— *7:15, 9:15, 11:15, 1:15,3:15, 

5:16. 
From OAKLAND— *6:15, 8:15, 10:15, 12:15, 2:15, 4:15. 



•Sundays excepted._ ^Sundays only. 

Standard Time furnished by RANDOLPH & CO., S. F. 



A. IN. TOWNE, 

Gen. Manager. 



T. H. GOODMAN, 
Gen. Pass, and Tkt. Agt. 



" INCOMPREHENSIBLE." 
"What a Incomprehensible Mirandy's got 
to be sence she went to thur 'cademy," remar ed 
Mrs. Homespun to her husband. " W*y, w t's 
the pal been doin' now?" inquired Daniel. 
'* Doin'! " exclaimed Mrs. Homespun; " w'y, she 
said phe must go to her room to disrobe, as she 
wished to retire early." ''Disrobe and retire," 
murmured Daniel; " wot's them, ma?" "I 
dunno," replied ma ; "but she didn't do nothin 
of the sort. She only undressed and went to 
bed. Did ye ever hear o' sich p'evarication ?" 
Judging from the groan that came from Daniel 
it is safe to presume that he never did. 

— Presbyterian Banner. 



" I've got a new job," said a young man the 
other day. " What's that? " " I'm going to be 
a detective in the Philadelphia mint; and my 

firl says she likes me better than ever, and that 
am good enough to eat now." "How so?" 
" Oh, because she's always very fond of a mint 
spy." — Boston Courier. 




Broad Gauge. 



COMMMENCING SUNDAY, NOV. 16lh, 1884, and 
until f"rther notice, Boats ard Trains will leave from 
and arrive at San Francisco Passenger Depot, MAR- 
KET-STREET WHARF, as follows 



Leave S. F. 



Week 
Days. 



Sundays. 



Destination. Arrive in S. F. 



Petaluma, 

Santa Rosa, 

Fulton, 

Windsor, 

Healdsburg, 

Cloverdale 

and 

Way Stations. 



Sundays. 



Week 
Days. 



7:45 a. m. |8:00 a m. | Guerneville. |6:00 r. m. 



6: 00 P. M. 
6:00 P. 



Stages connect at Santa Rosa for Sebastopol. At 
Clairville for Skaggs Springs, and at Cloverdale for 
Highland Springs, Kelseyville, Soda Bay, Lake-port 
Bartlett Springs. Ukiah, Eureka, Navarre Ridge, Men- 
docino City and the Geysers. 

EXCURSION TICKETS from Saturdays to Mondays 
to Petaluma, $1 75 ; to Santa Rosa, §3 ; to Healdsburg, 
$4 ; to Cloverdale, .-:?. 

EXCURSION TICKETS, good for Sundays only— To 
Petaluma, $L 50 ; to Santa Rosa, $2 ; to Healdsburg, S3; 
to Cloverdale, §4 50 ; to Guerneville, S3. 

From San Francisco for Point Tiburon and San Ra- 
fael, Week Days— 7:45 A. m., 9:10 a. m., 3:30 p. m., 5:00 
p. m.; SundayB: 8:00 A. m., 10:30 a. m., 2:30 P. M., 
5:00 p. M 

To San Francisco from San Rafael, Week Days— 
8:00 a. m., 10.20 a. M , 3:40 p. m., 5:05 p. m.; Sun- 
days: 8:10 A. M , 11:45 A. M., 3:45 P. M., 5:05 p. M. 

To San Francisco from Point Tiburon, Week Days — 
8:20 a. M., 10:45 a. M. 4:05 p. M., 5:30 P. M.; Sundays: 
8:35 A. m. , 12:10 P. M., 4:10 p. m., 5:30 P. m. 

PETER J. McGLYNN, ARTHUR HUGHES. 
Gen. Pass, and Tkt. Agt. General Manager. 



SONOMA VALLEY R. R. 

Steamer JAMES M. DONAHUE Leaves San Francisco, 

and Connects with Trains at SONOMA 

LANDING, as follows : 

4. (~\ (~\ p.m. , Daily (Sundays excepted), from WASH- 
• ^ ^ INGTON-STREKT WHARF, for the Town 
of Sonoma, Glen Ellen and Way Points. 

Sunday Excursions. 

8. OH A- «- (Sundays only), from WASHINGTON- 
,£^\J STREET WHARF, for the Town of So- 
noma, Glen Ellen and Way Points. Round-Trip Tickets : 
To Sonoma, SI; to Glen Ellen, SI 50. 

PETER J. McGLYNN, ARTHUR HUGHES, 

Gen. Pass, and Tkt. Agt. General Manager. 



THE GASH GIRL. 

Hear the ladies at the counter 

Calling cash! cash! cash! 
As they rap their dainty pencils 

On the glass, glass, glass. 
All at once from twenty counters 

Calling cash! cash! cash! 
Right above the din and roar, 

As in and out the people pour, 
You could hear their happy voices 

Calling cash! cash! cash! 
And the little merry maidens, 
Each with book and parcel laden, 
Answer back in happy chime, 
Keeping time, time, time, 
In a sort of girlish rhyme, 
A dollar fifty even. 
Cash! cash! cash! — Poiton Globe. 



The Investigation made this season in re- 
gard to the feasibility of opening a line of navi- 
gation by way of Hudson's Bay to England has 
not had encouraging results. The straits lead- 
ing into the bay were blockaded with ice as early 
as October 21st, and a sailing vessel, the Prince 
of Wales, sent out to ascertain the character of 
the navigation, is sbut in, and will winter at 
Charlton Island, in James' Bay. The people of 
Manitoba, who have been endeavoring to secure 
a railroad connection with Hudson's Bay, hop- 
ing to find a short line in that direction for trade 
with Europe, will have to seek other channels 
for their commerce. 




PVRAILiROAa<j> ] 
BROAD GAIOE. 

Winter Time Schedule. 



Commencing Sunday, Nov. 16, 1884, 
And until further notice, Passenger Trains will leave 
from and arrive at San Francisco Passenger Depot 
(Townscnd St., between 3d and 4th streets), as follows: 



LEAVE 

S. F. 


DESTINATION. 


ARRIVE 
8. P. 


t6:50 a.m. 

8:30 A 11. 
10:40 a.m. 
*3:30 p.m. 

4:30 P.M. 
"5:15 P.M. 

6:30 p.m. 


( \ 

J ...San Mateo, Redwood,... 1 
j and Menlo Park [ 

{ J 


6:35 a.m. 
*S:10 a.m. 
9:03 A.M. 
*10:02am. 
3:36 p.m. 
t5:02 p.m. 
•6:08 P.M. 


8:30 a.m. 
10:40 a.m. 
*3:30 p.m. 

4:30 p.m. 


( \ 9:03 A.M 
J ..Santa Clara, San Joseand.. 1 *10:02a.m. 
I ..Principal Way Stations... f 3:36 P.M. 
V. )\ 6:08 p.m. 


10:40 a.m. 
"3:30 P.M. 


J Gilroy, Pa jaro, Castro ville | i- 10:02 A.a- 
1 ...Salinas and Monterey ... f | 6:08 p.m. 


10:40 A.M. 
"3:30 p.m. 


■[ ..Hollisterand Tres Pinos.. j-puolp"*! 


10:40 a.m. 
"3.30 p.M 


( Watsonville, Aptos, Soquel M ,. nR 
"( (Camp Capitola)& Santa Cruz. f| 



♦Sundays excepted. tSundays only (Sportsmen's Train). 

£3rSTANDARD OF Time. — Trains are run on Pacific 
Standard Time (Randolph & Co.), which is Ten (10) 
minutes faster than San Francisco Local Time. 

STAGE CONNECTIONS are made with the 10:40 A. M. 
Train, except PESCADERO Stages via San Mateo and 
Redwood, which connect with 8:30 A. m. Train. 

SPECIAL ROUND-TRIP TICKETS.-At Reduced 
Rates— to Monterey, Aptos, Soquel and Santa Cruz; 
also to Paraiso and Paso Robles Springs. 

EXCURSION TICKETS 

„ „ , . ( Sold Sunday Morning ; good for 

For Sundays only, j Return ^ me day _ 

For Saturday, ( Sold Saturday and Sunday only ; 
Sunday and< good for Return until following Moo- 
Monday (day, inclusive, at the following rates: 



Round Trip 
from San 
Francisco to 



San Bruno.. 
Millbrae .... 
Oak Grove.. 
San Mateo. 
Belmont .... 
Redwood.... 
Fair Oaks.. . 
Menlo Park. 
Mayfield .... 



Sun 
Tkt. 



Sat to Round Trip 
Mon. from San 
Tkt. Francbco to 



75 

1 00 

i no 

1 25 
1 25 

1 25 



i 50 
65 
90 

1 10 
1 25 
1 -10 
1 50 
1 60 
1 75 



Mount'nView 
Lawrences... 
Santa Clara . 
San Jose.... 

Gilroy 

Aptos 

Soquel 

Santa Cruz.. 
Monterey ... 



Sun. 
Tkt. 



Sat to 
Mon. 
Tkt. 



1 50 
1 75 
1 75 
■2 75 



2 25 
2 50 
2 50 

4 00 

5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 



TICKET OFFICES. - Passenger Depot, Townsend 
street; Valencia-street - Station, and No. 613 Market 
street, Grand Hotel. 
A. C. BASSETT, H. R. JUDAH, 

Superintendent. Asst. Pass. & Tkt. Agt. 

^-SOUTHERN DIVISIONS.^ 
For points on Southern Divisions and the East, see 
C. P. R. R. Time Scuedulb. 



THE OUTSIDE DOG. 

You may sing of your dog, your bottom dog, 
Or of any dog that you please ; 

I go for the dog, the nice old dog, 
That knowingly takes his ease, 

And wagging his tail outside the ring, 
Keeping always his bone in sight, 

Cares not a pin in his sound old head 
For either dog in the fight. 

Not his is the bone they are fighting f or, 
And why should my dog sail in 

With nothing to gain but a certain chance 
To lose his own precious skin ? 

There may be a few, perhaps, who fail 
To see it quite in this light ; 

But when the fur flies I had rather be 
The outside dog in the fight. 

I know there are dogs, injudicious dogs, 
That think it is quite the thing 

To take the part of one of the dogs, 
And go yelping into the ring. 

But I care not a pin what all may say 
In regard to the wrong or the right, 

My money goes as well as my song, 

For the dog that keeps out of the fight. 
— Philadelphia Call. 



Jan 31, 188ft. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISKK 



13 



"BIZ." 

There la lomo Improvement to 1 noted In II tlook of 

ittnl feature conuind U> California, bat « like 

>ur New V.irk aiohangea, while tin- tola 

k'rtphii .. tie- Atlantic ure .\. r, mora pronounced. Some ,tn\ 

taly i« being FaH bara by raaaon <t" tha n-m arrival "f the «'. and 0. 

P '<!.>, which left this port f»r Hongkong 43 tlays 

ago* with iih, nit si mi i 'hi n.tinen nr*o»r,l, and baa not yet baan heard from 

at Yoknbarna, ami tl inning to fear ih.it some very aeri- 

[dant ha* happened. It ins ,1"- not arriv..' at Yokohama within 

u at that place are ordered by cable t" 

it a steamer to searon for her. Tha San Pablo la a new veaaeli 

nontly come through the Sm. z (.'anal frmn Philadelphia, where 

the was built. Her list of offican anil passengers was published a short 

time ago. 

Arrivals of deep water ve*-i<-U have of late been quite numerous, and in- 
eludes the following slaps from New York: Alfred I». Snow, 122 days; 
• S. Belknap, L4S day-; Sterling, 1£S days. These vessels all 
brought anthracite (*'»al and well assorted cargoes of general Merchandise. 
We have alao from Hull, Itr. hark Moel y don, 140 days passage with 
Coal and Marohandiaa nam Hamburg we have the Br. hark Cynisca, 
l.vj days, with a large and wall aaaorte l cargo ol Herman goods. From 
Liverpool era bare the ship Borrowdale, 105 dava, with a full cargo of 
Marohandiaa: ship Stem Blanca, 109 days, with "J..v>- bona « foal. The Ur. 
ihip Kirkoadbrightahin from <;iasg'>w, 113 days, with 2,236 tons Coal. 
Prom !'• irdeaoi we have the Br. bark Leopold and Marie. 143 days, with 
3.800 pkt;s. Wine, :'.<• pk->. Brandy, ' i>> ctb-'h Vermouth. 1,474 casts 
Sardines, .-t<\ From ( renoa we have the Br. bark Caonaho, 173 days, with 
Marble, i Hlva < »il. Wine, Vermouth, etc. From t'ardiff, ship S. F. Saw- 
yer, 13.S days, with 2,206 tons Coal. From Honolulu we have the Oceanic 
ship Mariposa, 7 days, with passengers and mails, and for cargo 
bags Sugar, 2,500 bags Rice, 2,270 hunches Bananas, etc. Bark 
Eureka from same, 19 days, with 7,7CO bags Sugar, etc. Bark Discovery 
from same, 14 days, with 10,426 bage Sugar, tioO bags Rice, etc. From 
Tahiti barken tine City of Papete, 30 days, with Cocoanuts, etc. ' 

The O. aud O. Steamship Oceanic, hence for China and Japan on the 
22d inst., carried for cargo 2,000 ctls. Barley, 2,000 ctls. Oats, said to be 
for the French Government; 10,540 bbla. Flour, 269,400 yds. Cottons, 
11.214 lbs. Gin-sen*; and other Mdse. for Hongkong— value 996,342; also 
in Treasure, $511,049. To Japan, per same steamers, 345 bhls. Flour, 
4 000 lbs. Sugar and MuW — value J30.641 To India, 2.520 bbls. Flour 
— value $8,002. To Victoria, perstmr. Mexico, hence January 26tb: Coffee, 
Sugar and Gen. Mdse. — value $10,70(1. The stinr. Wilmington, for same, 
carried 10,000 lbs. Sugar and Mdse. of the value of $3,000. To Kahului, 
per Ferris S. Thompson, Coffee and Gen. Mdse. — value §20,219. 

Quicksilver.- The movements of (Quicksilver in London for a series 
of years have been as follows : 

Imports. Exports. 

1881, 6asks 56,261 24,842 

1882 45,921 40,424 

1883 54.520 48,997 

1884 59,970 52,492 

Totals 21G.072 100,755 

The imports during the four years were 49,917 flasks in excess of the 
exports. The transactions in London during the past year surpassed those 
of any prievious year of which we have any record, and, although the 
exports were on a liberal scale, the stock in London is estimated at about 
80,000 flasks. Latest advices quote Rothschild's price at £0 15s. ^ flask, 
and £'0 10s. from second hands. California receipts in 1883, 40,725 
flasks; 1884, 31,013 flasks— showing a falling-off of 14,812 flasks. The es- 
timated production for 1885 in California is estimated to be 25,000 flasks 
— say 7,000 flasks leBS than in 1884 — and the opinion is expressed by those 
we'l versed in the business that, should the price rise here, even to $50 
I ■ flask, the increased product would be small. 

Grain Freights have eased off a little during the week, so that Spot 
Charters to U. K. are effected with difficulty at 42s. 6d., U. K., for iron, 
and wood correspondingly less. We note engagements as follows: Nor. 
bark India, 1,141 tons, Wheat to Cork, U. K , or Continent. £2, chartered 
prior to arrival. Ship John Currier, 1,847 tons, Wheat to Cork, U. K., 
or Antwerp, £1 19s. Br. iron ship Sierra Nevada, 1,474 tons, Wheat to 
Cork, U. K,, private. Br. iron Bhip Golden Fleece, 1,257 tons, Wheat to 
Cork, U. K.., £2 5s. prior to arrival. Br. iron ship River Nifch, 1,125 
tons. Wheat to Cork, U. K., £2 2s. Gd. ; direct port, 2s. 6d. less. Ship 
C. F. Sargent, 1,704 tons, Wheat to Cork, U. K., or Antwerp, £1 19s., 
short lay days. Br. iron bark Cynisca, 847 tons, Wheat to Cork, U. K., 
£2 5a., prior to arrival. Nor. bark Ocean, 984 tons, Wheat to Cork, 
U. K., £1 17s. 6d., chartered prior to arrival. 

On the Berth about 90,000 tons register; same date 18S4, 50.000 tons. 

Disengaged about 80,000 tons; same date 1884, 170,000 tons. 

Fleet to arrive, 130,000 tons; same date 1884, 134,000 tons; same date, 
1883. 108,000 tons; same date, 1882, 200,000 tons. 

Wheat.— The present spot price is$L25@l 30 for shipping and S1.32£ 
@1.35. per ctl. for Extra Choice White Milling — Futures, buyer 
season, $1 3G(5jL37. 

Barley.— The present Spot price of Brewing $L05@1.12&, Feed, 85@, 
95c. per ctl., Futures No. 1 Feed, buyer, season, 98c; seller, season, 89 
@90c; buyer, 1885, S1.02A; seller, 1855, 88c. 

Corn. — Spot price of Yellow and White, Sl@1.10 per ctl. 

Oats.— Spot price of Extra Choice, §1.40@1.45; No. 1, Extra Choice, 
Sl,25@1.30; No. 2, Extra Choice, 95@31.15 per ctl. 

Coffee. — The market is quiet, at 10{a|12£c. for Central American greens. 

Sugar.— No change in price for a long time. White, refined, 7f@8c; 
Yellow, 6@7c; Raws, 4@5c. 

Rice.— Hawaiian Table, 5c; New Mixed China, 4@4^c; No. 1 China, 
5@5£c; No. 2 China, 4J@4£c.; Extra China, 0@0.^c. 

Wool. — The market is exceedingly dull, and prices more or less nom- 
inal by reason of the bad and inferior stock yet remaining unsold. 

Hops, — We note an improved demand, at 10@13c. 



Honey. Low pricea still prevail, with a light demand and big itoek. 
Potatoes. Supplies lih< - , er ctl, 

Frutt Apples ..r.' plentiful and ohaap, California ■ Irangaa are in full 
■apply, qaall 

Latest Grain Charter. The Br. Iron bark Berwick Law, 1,243 
I i k, l'. K.. said to be at £2. 

Iqulquo. German bark Krimhild, 46" day*, has 800 tniut Nils 
M neake .v I k>. 

Cardiff Br. hark AJdborougb, LSI days, has 1,423 tons Coal and 500 
tone ' take. 



The now Photograph Gallery of Willi. mis & Norton, 014 Market 
street, bet. l'oweil and Stockton i use only the San ETranciaco Dry Plate. 




GEO. STREET, Agent News Letter, 30 Cornhill, E. C, London. 

LIEBIG COMPANY'S 

EXTRACT 

OF MEAT. 

Allllll.ll Null', 

1,000,000 Jam. 

Finest ond Chcajtrat 
Moat- Ft a vtiri mj n lurk 
for 8oup8 1 Modi- Uishin 

and Sauces, 

CAT HON.— Genuine ONI-V with thnfac simile of li UiiiN IJKIllu'.s Si-nut ure in 
Blue Ink acrois Label. Tho title " BARON LIEBIG" and bis photograph having 
been lately largely used by dealers having no connection with BARON LIEBIG, the 

public are hereby informed that tho LIKBlii COM I' AN V hit the unlv mimufiutur,. * 

who are able to ufler the article with BARON LIE BIG'S guarantee of genuineness, 
An invaluable and palatable tonic in all cases of weak digestion and debility. 
'■ Is a success and a boon for which Nations should feel grateful."— See Medical 

Frew, Lancet, British Medical Journal, etc. 

To be had of all Storekeepers. Grocers and Chemists. Sole Agents fur the United 
States (wholesale only), c. DAVID & 00,, 9 Penchurch Avenue, London, England. 

Sold Wholesale by RICHARDS <fc HARRISON, San Francisco. 

IRELAND-MAURICE O'DONNELL. 

Pursuant to a Ju Ism .lit ol' the Hi{jh Court ol Justice. In 
Ireland, Chancery Division, dated i:»th day of dune, 1884, and raadfl in the 

Matter. if the Estate nf MAURICE o'DuNNKLL, deceased, RICHARD O'DuNNKLL 
Plaintiff, VALENTINE O'DONNELL and other*. Defendants (1883, No. 4888), MAU- 
RICE O'DONNELL (Neph w of MAUKICE O'DONNELL, late of Corrick-on-Suir, 
in the County of Tipperary, who died in or about the- month of June, 1870), win. 
emigrated io Australia in or about the year l85f,or the issue of the said MAI I'M i 
O'OONN'ELL, if he be now dead, is, or are, by solicitor, 

On or Before the 1st Day of May, 1885, 
To come in and prove bis or their claim as devisee under the \vi 1 of the said MAU- 
RICE O'DONNELL, deceased, at the Chambers of the Master of the Rolls, at the 
Four Courts, Inns ljuay, in the City of Dublin, or in default thereof they will be 
excluded from the benefit of the said Judgment. FRIDAY, the 8th day of May, 
1 --."., :i! 11 o'clock in the forenoon, at the said Chambers, is appointed forbearing 
and adjudicating on said claims. B. E. WHITESTONE, Chief Clerk. 

Dated 19th day Of December, 1884. 

PEIRSE KELLY, Solicitor, ;17 North Great Geo. street, Dublin, Ireland. 



THOMAS PRICE'S 

Assay Office and Chemical Laboratory, 

524 Sacramento Street, San Francisco. 

Careful Analyses made of Ores, Metals, Soils, Waters, Industrial Products, F 1-, 

Medicines and Poisons. 
Consultations on Chemical, Mining and Metallurgical Questions. 

CHARGES. 

ANALYSES. 
Qualitative Analysis of Ores. $10 to $25 00 
Quantitative " " IS to 50 00 



ASSAYS. 

Gold and Silver ' 93 00 

Gold, Silver and Lead 6 00 

Gold, Sliver and Copper 5 00 

Copper 8 OOJQuantitative 

Iron 3 ou 

Tin 5 00 

Quicksilver 5 00 

Manganese 5 00 

Chromium 6 00 



Qualitative Analysis of Water- 



Guano 

Proximate Analysis of Coal 

Quantitave " " 

Complete Analysis, Qualitative and 
Quantitative, of Complex Sub- 
stances, at Special Rates. 



25 00 
75 00 
25 U0 
10 03 
50 00 



MOUNT VERNON COMPANY, BALTIMORE. 

The undersigned having been appointed AGENTS FOR THE PACIF C COAST 
for the sale of the manufactures of above company, have now in store: 

Sail Duck— all Number*; 
Hydraulic -all Numbers: 
Draper and Wagon Duck, 

From 30 to 120 Inches Wide, and a Complete Assortment of All Qualities 2Si-Inc 
DUCK, from 7 ozs. to 15 ozs., inclusive. 

MURPHY, GRANT & CO. 

JOSEPH GILLOTT'S STEEL PENS. 

Gold Medal, Paris, 1878. 
L^iolu by all stationers. Sole Agrent lor the UuiieU States: 



c^iold by all Stationers, suieasi 
O MR. HENRY HOE, 91 John street, N. Y. 



ALASKA COMMERCIAL COMPANY 

No- 310 Sansome Street, 

San Franoisco, 

WHOLESALE DEALERS IN FURS. 

AT) T) T "7 T? Send six cents for postage, aDd receive free, a costly box 
X JV 1 f* I\" of goods which will help all, of either Bex, to more money 
right away than anything else in this world. Fortunes await the workers ab&olute'y 
sure. At once addreBB Tboe A Co., Augasta, Maine. 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Jan. 31, 1885. 



MAG'S LETTER. 
Dear N. L.: There's been a awful big fuss to one o' the big hotels, but 
as it poas'bly can be hushed up I reckon I'd better not say much about 
it till more is publicly known. You see, Mag gets tits every time she 
tells you things 't no other people knows, 'n these folks just go round 
Bayin' mean, spiteful thiDgs. Now, I'd just like to know if the people 't 
don't behave theirselves don't deserve to be shown up? You bet they 
do every time, 'a the real disgustiu" shameful way 't some married folks 
*t I could, mention— 'u will, by 'n by— carry on, is enough to make your 

head swim. Anyhow, I just hope 't that set to the Hotel '11 get 

their deserts. There's one o' the evils o' the late decision, 't every female 
in town thinks 't she has a perfect right to go for a man, married or sin- 
gle, 'n act as a kind o' lemon-squeezer on him for coin. 

I had a real stavin' time over to Angel Island. The weather was so 
fine 't lots o' comp'ny went. Ned 'n me went on a private yacht, 'n didn't 
we have a good tioie? When we trot to the Island we had more fun than 
enough— dancin', tiirtin' 'n carryin' on generally. It's a yity 't one o' 
them Army ladies don't get some one to tell her o' one o' ht?r serious de- 
fects (the Judge said he'd do it for sixpence, but, la me, he darsent, bold 
as he is)! Ned told me 't he saw a queer sight round near one o' the big 
guns, 'n the Judge says 't he saw a good-sized flirtation goin' on in the 
house, 'n immediately asked a conundrum on it. Says he: "Why did the 
goin's on o' that couple resemble the young lady's initials?" (Great 
Csesar, who could guess a thing like that?) So, when we gave him a 
chorus o' "give it up," he told us " Because 'twas all eyes " (I's). Not so 
bad for an old bach., eh? The bird-cage soldier wasn't on parade. I 
reckon the widdah has him in pretty tight leadin' strings. But you just 
wait till he gets a bit o' silver between his teeth, 'n see if the old woman 
don't prance to another tempo (as they say in Spanish). I reckon he's 
practiced the snaffle to so much purpose in securin' her 't he'll make her 
6nd her lines in anythin' but pleasant placeB. But at present writin' she 
has him well in hand, 'n though the uature o' the animal is what Heath- 
cote 'd call " doosed skittish, you know," he ain't ready for a bolt yet 
awhile, by long odds. 

Was you to the first night o' lolanthe ? If so you could see for yourself 
what went on in that " box party !" Ain't it queer how some folks im- 
agined *t the whole theatre can't see 'em 'n make remarkstoo. Why Ned 
says t all the men was talkin' of it out in the lobby. I tell you what 'tis, 
things '11 be pretty lively in that quaiter before long or I'm muchly mis- 
taken. The Judge has been kind o' wakin' up in the riddle line lately, 'n 
he's an awful pesky old chap 'hout such things 'cause you don't wan't to 
be "guessin"' all the time. He asked Nellie the other day why one o* 
the Clay street gang, (thats what he calls 'em) was sure o' havin' a good 
time if she married the man o' her choice. Nellie tried hard to find out, 
gue^siu' 'cause he's ricb, good lookin' 'n so forth. " No," says the Judge, 
" because she 'd always be having a/ro^'c." (D' ye see ?) Another girl 
't we all know is just crazy for a grant to adopt matrimony. P'raps the 
Judge wasn't far wrong after all when he said it 'd be equal to " cussing " 
if she got one. Ma said " why how on top of this earth could that be," 
says he, "because the permission would have to be a dam (d) one." 
La me ! 

Tobin 's comin' out strong o' late; he's goin' to have the Euthuno's up 
to his shebang the next time. I wonder if he '11 put on his soldier clothes 
to do the honors in ! Well, I do think 't a girl 'd be pretty hard up 't 'd 
choose such a lookin' chap as he is. That's the reason 't the lady with 
the specs is so down on the men 't she's all the time gettin' up things for 
wimmen only. Look 't the new version o' the charge o' the light brigade 
in her hundred girl tea; *n her piano club, where the wimmen go 'n exer- 
cise their muscle poundin' that instrument for a couple o' hours. I cal- 
culate she does it all to show off her digits (that's borrowed from Ned). 
'Pears to me she 'd be doin' more good to her kind if she 'd get a hundred 
men together 'n let the wimmen go for 'em. The difficulty 'd be in find- 
iu' a hundred men. The old chaps is hard to corrall, 'n the youths o' the 
period don't fill the bill. Why Flora told me yesterday 't Henry Red- 
ingtun had had a cryin' spell *t lasted two hours, 'cause the Crockers 
would 't take him to New Orleans with 'em, 'n the little widdah had to 
promise to bring him a new fashion bo'k from the East, before he 'd be 
comforted. Now think o' callin' him a man ! 

Where do all the Barons come from ? Now we hear from the Tub on 
wheels 't there's a Baron joined their crowd, said Tub evidently tbinkin' 
more of announcin' that fact than describin' the scenery. What it is to be 
a toady ! I heard the other day 't the young Tub was goin' in for Althea, 
'n that's why he's been most burgtin' with anxiety to champion her cause. 
Well, you know, " anythin' for coin," 's a motto o' that family ; the old 
Tub havin' sold hisself early in life the young one couldn't be expected 
to do less than follow his example. But I really doubt if Althea lost, 
as she allows herself to be, to all sense o' anythin' butTylerism, 'd take 
up with such a lout as him. 

That was a right funny thing 't happened up to Sacramento the other 
evenin'. Wasn't it ? You know 't a club up there gave a masquerade 
party, 'n a lot o' high-toned folks went up from here to 'tend it. Well, it 
appears 't a certain fellah 'bout town 'ts got a real sweet pretty wife, told 
her 't he was obliged to go to Los Angeles on sudden bizness, 'n so he bid 
her goodbye 'n left the day before the party. While she was feelin' 

awful bad about his leaven', Miss come in 'n asked her to join 'em 

in a trip to the Capitol. So she agreed to go, 'n go she did. All the crowd 
wore dominoes, *n she was a walkiu' round quietly when a mask come up 

'n began to carry on with little Mrs. who was along with her. 

What was her amazement to recognize her husband's voice 't she thought 
was away down south. You bet 't she made things pretty lively for him 
that night both before 'n behiud the mask, 'cause it transpired 't he had 
escorted the wife of a down town merchant 'ts rather noted for her flirty 
ways. I wonder why 'tis, 't folks do go on so once they get married. 
Why, look 't all the big boardi l'-houses, all the iniquity they cover 1 
(Its a real true fact, Ned says, 'n he ought to know) every born one of 'em 
(men n wimmen, not boardin'-houses) a carryin* on with each other's 
husbands 'n wives. Sometimes old bach's is awful. Why the Judge made 
a riddle the other night to a big dinner party 't ma says reg'larly en- 
lightened her about somethin' she 'd been puzzlin' over. Says he, " Why 
does the action of some mutual friends of ours in regard to a certain fair 
lady, resemble a well known farce?" Ma guessed 'cause they're " all in 
a fog." " No, madam," says he. " Its because its done to oblige Ben- 
son." (N. B. Pacific club, take a note thereof.) 



It seems *t there's goin' to be a opposition tennis club. No wonder, 
when there's so much favoritism shown. They say 't the possee old flirt 
with the grown-up son in the background is the one 't started it goin'. 
(Ned says 't a certain capitalist is the latest fish in her vet). There's two 
new engagements just ready to pop out, 'n one 'ts not true. (Bess says 
'tain't fair to give her away). That one over to Rincon Hill seems to be 
a dead sure thing, though how she can stand such a la-di-dah sort o' chap 
passes my comprehension. Perhaps he drops it when he's makin' love. 
The Judge asked her the other night, up to their party, right plum ouf. : 
"Why will you make a successful local politician?" The poor girl blushed 
up, 'cause she's kind o' 'fraid o' the Judge, but when he told her, " be- 
cause you've now a whole Ward," she sort o' smiled, *n then he added : 
" I suppose, my charmiDg young friend, the sealing of your vows is not 
far off?" Ain't he a comical old chap, always a goin' on in riddles, 'n 
such like? 

The girls get a shy at two parties now every time 't anybody gives one, 
'cause, don't you see, the party calls are made in the evenin'. 'n dnncin' 'n 
supper 's a thing 'ts looked for as a natural thing, 'n, as Ma says, it's 
enough to keep one from entertainin' bein' expected to do a double af- 
fair. (La me! from what Ned says, most folks *n things is " double " in 
Society). But the great catch o' the day is the New York Englishman 
to the Palace Hotel. All the wimmen are goin' for him like hot cakes. 
They tried to get him up to Sacramento on what the Judge called the 
" Juekettin' tour," but be was busy down here tryin' to cut out the 
young doctor o' the keen eye, 'n he did it so successful! v *t the collar-box 
(made as companion to the monchoire case) never reached further than 
the Palace Hotel, 'n I guess 't that violet satin article 's all pretty Jim 11 
get from that quarter. Mao. 

The following Callfornlans are registered at the office of Thode & Co., 
bankers, Dresden : Arnstein. S., San Francisco; Price, Miss, San Fran- 
cisco; Simpson, Miss M., San Francisco ; and the following at the office 
of the Continental Gazette, Paris: Coleman, Mrs., Sau Francisco; De 
May, Mr. and family, San Francisco. 



Look Here.— The Sweet Potatoes. Tomatoes, Sugar Peas, Beans, As- 
paragas, etc., canned by the King-Morse Canning Co., can't be beat on 
this coast. 

Mrs. Parvenu would not allow her children to go to Mrs. Learned's 
children's party because she was told Mr. Learned was afflicted with the 
bibliomania, and she didn't want her girls to catch it. — JV. Y. Mail. 

BANKS. 

SECURITY SAVINGS BANK. 

GUARANTEE CAPITAL, 9300,000. 

Officers: Vice-President, Jerome Lincoln; Secretary, W. 
S. Jones; Attorney, Sidney V. Smith. Loans made on Real Estate and other 
Approved Securities. Office : No. 215 Sansome street, San Francisco. Oct. 1. 

THE GERMAN SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 

Deutsche Spar and I.e in bank. $0,526 Calif orniastreet, San 
Francisco. Officers : President, L. GOTTIG. Board of Directors. — L. 
Gottig, Fred Roeding, Chas. Kohler, Edw. Kruse, George H. Eggers, N. Van Bergen, 
H. L.Simon, Peter Spreckels, A. E. Hecht. Secretary, GEO. LETTE; Attorneys, 
JARBOE & HARRISON. 'May 18. 

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA-MEDICAL DEPARTMENT. 

he Twenty-second Animal Coarse of Lectures will begin 

on MONDAY, 

February 2d, at 9 A. M., 

At the College Building, Stockton street, between Chestnut and Francisco. All stu- 
dents are requested to call at the Dean's Office for registration before the above date. 
R. A. McLEAN, M. D., Dean, 

603 Merchant street 

A FUNERAL SUIT; ALSO FULL DRESS-SUITS 

For Special Occasions, can he had at 

J. COOPER'S TAILORING ESTABLISHMENT, 

24 New Montgomery Street, 

Palace Hotel, Just Below the Bridge. 



T 




Tlie IB ess t 



PUKE NATUEAL 

Mineral 

Water! 

INDORSED BY THE MEDICAL PROFESSION. 
FOR SALE EVERYWHERE. DEPOT, 51S SACRAMENTO ST. 

J. TOMKINSON'S LIVERY AND SALE STABLE, 

Kos. 57, 59 and 61 Minna street, 

Bet. First and Second, San Francisco. One Block from Palace Hotel. 
Also Carriages and Cabs at Pacific Club, No. 130 Post svrcet; also Northeast Corner 
Montgomery md Bush streets. Vehicles of Every Description at Reduced Bates. 
TELEPHONE No. 153. July 26. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

POTOSI MINING COMPANY. 

Assessment No. 17 

Amount per Share 25 Cents 

Levied 1 January 27th, 1SS5 

Delinquent in Office March 2d, 1SS5 

Day of Sale of Delinquent Stock March 24th, 1885 

C. L. McCOY, Secretary. 
Office— Room 79, Nevada Block, No. 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, Cal. 



/ 



Jan. 31, 1885 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 






PARISIAN GOSSIP. 

[ H> .* Pwtaba Istdj ol rtahloo.] 

January 5, 1885. I bar that, before my l»tt«r reaches itn destination, 
' i- at will already be out of Mute. Well, patience ! When we 
. telephone between u we will ;.lter sill thla »nil, in the meantime, 
lei me i ** 1 1 yon what we are wearing at the present moment in Paris. 
Firstly, lanky dream are quite, quite out uf fashion now with 114/ Even 
Eoffliah t iil-T-uiiio'e coat* have openings at the back, which nre tilled in 
witt pnitB, in order to allow of the Cournure, whloh u essoining gigantic 
proportion*, alaa ! I nay alas— because, from one extreme, we are falling 
into another from the £>irectofrr , we are returning t<> Louis XV, Of 
the two, I really think that the Directoire was the mo?t becoming. 01 
ooaree, 1 do not allude to the " Noah's Ark " costumes, which were simply 
bideont bat those graceful serpentine dresses, worn in society, reminded 
us of (.reek draperies, and were far more artistic than the "Bunch" 
dresses of the moment. What sculptor would even dream of spoiling his 
: mart tie by making a statute with hoops, unless commanded to do so, to 
celebrate .some " hooped " celebrity. 

It is hard to think that fashion cannot adopt a just medium between 
no skirts and hoops, both of which are utibecomiug to modern women, on 
account of the different habits of the present day. However, I must Dot 
begin grumbling, or I shall do nothing else to the end of the chapter, 
and that is not what you want. Consequently I repeat, that immense 
townunt are now worn at the back. There is no need to wear steels, 
however, either in the dress or in the underskirts. On the contrary, 
Worth, and other great dressmakers in Paris,* will not mike a dress for 
any lady who wears steels. Both the dress and the underskirts are made 
so full at the back, and the lining of dress-skirt is so firm, that no steels 
are required even with plain skirts, a bnon for which, under circum- 
stances, we cannot be too thankful. Steels are worn only by ladies who 
oannot afford to have their dresses made by a master of the art, and 
who have to substitute ungraceful ugliness for graceful elegance. All 
underskirts, also, are elaborately trimmed round the edne with deep 
torchon lace, and up the back with a ladder of flounces, all edged with 
the same lace. Train underskirts are rarely required, as most trains are 
made quite separate from the rest of the dress and are lined with rich 
silk which is quite sufficient in itself to keep them off from the under- 
dress. With train dresses made all together, a rich Batayense is placed 
under the train, and that also is quite sufficient, with the addition of a 
long underskirt, to touch the ground, but not to trail on it. A general 
rule for all dresses, not trains, is, that underskirts should always be of 
the same length, fullness and shape as the dress with which they are worn. 
When this is the case the dress always Hts well, but otherwise no dress 
can tit as it should fit. It is for this that every dressmaker should send 
home with every dress a set of skirts to be worn with it, and which may 
be multiplied as required. 

The rule is to wear short dresses in the streat, and tratn-dre«ses at 
home and at parties, etc. Only very young girls may wear short dresses 
now, even at balls. Married ladies, who dance, dance in trains. If the 
train be separate froni the dress, it can be held over one arm. If in one 
piece with the dress, it is allowed to swing round with the dancer, but 
this requires some art, and even training, to be safe and graceful. 

Bodices are cut low in two ways — the one ia high on the shoulders and 
pointed neatly to the waist, hoth front aud back; and the other is 
moderately low, front and back, but falls over the shoulders. Invisible 
sleeves, or mere straps, are worn in both cases, but a little band, like an 
arinlet, is sometimes added to the shoulder-strap, in mock apology for the 
sleeve it bo poorly represents. Lnops, or a fringe of jet beads, are also 
sometimes added to the shoulder-strap, to fall over the upper part of the 
arm, and I have also seen the shoulder strap draped over, as if the sleeve 
were too long and was drawn together at the sides, both front and back. 
This combination looks almost like a sleeve. Then theie is a triangle lace 
sleeve, under the arm only, with its points joined by a brooch or flower 
over the arm. All these sleeves are most becoming to a pretty arm, and 
I cannot too highly recommend them. Young girls wear short, puffed 
sleeves and bows on the shoulder to give them still greater depth. 

Long gloves to cover the elbows are still worn, and sometimes the up- 
per part is of lacs, and takes the place of sleeves, which is quite a boon 
to some ladies who are not possessed of the Venus of Milo's lost arms ! 

Most elegant and rich dresses for ladies who do not wear low-necked 
dresses, are composed of train skirts and gold or silver cuirasses, made 
hiffh to the neck and with long sleeves. 

Black and white lace blouse-bodices are also worn over low-necked even- 
ing dresses, when required for demi toilette. The reintroduction of these 
high lace over bodices is hailed with much pleasure in the fashionable 
world, and it is hoped that it may lead to the reintroduction of white 
muslin bodices for summer wear, with separate silk skirts. 

Jewelry is not much worn, but what little is worn, is of the costliest 
description. Mock jewelry is out of the question. Dog-collars, with 
bracelets to match, are universally worn, even when other jewelry is 
worn. They are often of quite plain velvet, butaometimes they are richly 
embroidered and studded with diamonds and other precious stones. They 
are worn with high dresses as well as with low dresses. 

Fichus and ruches are also still worn with hiifb dresses, to give them a 
brighter look ror dinner, theatre, etc. Fichus, however, are not becoming 
to stout figures, which they make stouter-looking still. The greatest 
luxury is displayed in opera-cloaks, and the hoods which accompany 
them. The mos', simple are made of white, or colored plush or velvet, and 
are lined and trimmed with aable, swan's down, or some equally expen- 
sive fur. The richest are made of brocade, threaded with pearls and gold 
and silver cord. These are lined and quilted with satin, and are trimmed 
with rich and rare lace. Eich opera-cloak is accompanied by a hood, ex- 
actly to match. This hood, however, is separate from the cloak, thus 
rendering each separate from the other. 

Id walking- dresses, the only novelty there is to record is the Astrakan 
costume, composed of skirt, jacket, muff, toque, aud even boots to 
match. But, by the time this reaches you, fur costumes may no longer 
be needed. However, as this is quite, quite a novelty, it will be perhaps 
more in vogue uext year than it is this year. 

Large-brimmed hats, I am happy to state, are quite the fashion again, 
and may be worn for visiting and church. Bonnets, owing to the last 
pointed beak-brims, are quite out of favor. With a large Gainsborough, 



OOVered with feathers, and a toqUt trimmed with black velvet, you have 
enough hats to last yoo until I write attain. Stockings, U> DDfttOD the 

color ol the dress, are worn during the day; for evening, nn the other 
baud, white embroidered silk Btooksnga are worn, with On . 
the dress. 

Masked balls are given all along the line, just now. " Peasant baUa " 
are In greatest favor, Every peasant oostame ol the world may i 
at ■' Peasant balls," and every one is becoming. " Flower balls," •■ v.- 
stable balls" and "Bird balls" are also fashionable, but the most fash- 
ionable of all are the " Peasant balls.'" N'estcepas. 

Madame Dx St. D h. 



AN OUTRAGED INDUSTRY. 

Two weeks ago we printed a cartoon in which a stick of candy waa 
somewhat conspicuous. This utick of candy was labeled with the names 
of its ingredients. The ingredients were of an unwholesome Bort, for the 
stick of candy was of the kind that is sold to our children in this great 
and enlightened city. And one of the ingredients on our list was glucose. 

That brought out the gentleman from the glucose district. 11. 
upon us and explained that his glucose was not the oilymargarine of 
sugar, but a respectable and healthful product. He brought with him a 
report of the National Academy of Sciences, which gave glut 
excellent charatcer. He furthermore requested us to publish the report. 
When we print the New York Directory and the Congressional Becord by 
way of a supplement to Puck, we shall take pleasure in complying with 
his request. At present, the pressure on our columns is too great. 

However, we are willing to accent the dictum of the National Academy 
of Sciences. If the National Academy of Sciences thinks that glucose is 
all ritrht, all right it is. Glucose is made from starch, and starch is a 
harmless and inoffensive article. We have known men to wear it next to 
their breasts until it utterly disappeared ; and they never seemed to suffer 
from it. 

But the gentlemen from the glucose district, instead of stopping right 
there, and leaving us under the impression that glucose was a much ma- 
ligned manufacture, proceeded to spoil his whole effect by leaving us a 
bottle of glucose and a hunk of corn-sugar for us to sample. 

We will admit that he got even with us in this way — if he was angry 
with us he got in bis fine work of deadly revenge; but he didn't succeed 
in popularizing glucose in this office. 

We tried the corn-sugar first on the Goat Editor, and he said it tasted 
like stale cocoanut pie. Well, it did. But when the Society Editor got 
hold of it, he said it suggested to him a combination of a clay pipe and a 
stick of chewing-gum. And we all realized the force of his characteriza- 
tion. When the Assyrian Pup took an incautious bite of it, he looked as 
though he thought it tasted like tallow-caodles. If that was his idea, be 
was probably dead right. 

We tried the glucose on the gentlemen of the artistic staff. We told 
them it was a new form ot semi-solidified and scentless gin, and they 
eagerly grasped at it. Those who oared to converse upon the subject af- 
terward said that they did not hanker after vaseline as a regular diet. 

These are the results of the experiments in glucose-eating conducted 
by Puck's Academy of Sciencea. The experiments will not be renewed. 
We have some glucose left. It is probably healthful ; to some it may be 
a delicacy. But it is improbable that any members of the Puck staff 
will ever become victims to the glucose habit. —Puck, 



It was mentioned in thene columns, some two weeks ago, that Messrs. 
Bones & Valentine were engaged in erecting a large Skating Hink at 
Alameda. We are now happy to state that the construction is proceed- 
ing rapidly, aud that it will soon be in a condition to entertain the pub- 
lic. Its dimensions are one hundred and twenty-five feet by thirty six 
feet, and it is located on Park street, at the terminus of the C. P. I!. \[. 
(broad gauge). It will be in every respect a completely-equipped aud 
comfortably-furnished Kink, and Alameda society circles can look for- 
ward to spending many happy evenings in it. The proprietors are 
courteous, experienced gentlemen, and all visitors can rely upon having 
every proper attention paid to them. 

CHARLES R. ALLEN, 
120 Beale Street, 

Wholesale and Retail Dealer in HOUSE. STEAM, FOUNDRY ami BLACKSMITH 

COAIi. 

Retail Oidem solicited. TELEPHONE 808. 

Miss Travor and Mrs. L. A. K. Clappe's 

SELECT SCHOOL FOR YOUNG LADIES AND CHILDREN, 

AT HASTINGS-ON-HUDSON, WESTCHESTER COUNTY, N. Y. 
Number pupils limited to fifteen. Send for Catalogue. May 3. 

ZEITSKA INSTITUTE, 

NO. 922 POST STREET. 

French, German and English Day and Boardiiifr-School for 
Young Ladies and Children, with KINDERGARTEN. 
Terra commenced January 17, 1886. Address MME. B. ZEITSKA, 

[Jan. 17.] Principal. 

MISS M. B. BELANGER, 

Dressmaking Parlors and Pattern Rooms, 

Central Block— Entrance 14 Dupont Street, San Francisco. 

DANCING ACADEMY, 

1328 BUSH STE-EET. CORNER POLK. 

Prof. O. A. Lnat respectfully annonuces that his new Acad- 
emy, 1328 Bush street, is now open for Juvenile and Evening Classes. Office 
Hours, for Terms, etc., 10 a. m. to 12 M., and 1 to 5 P. M. Fob. 9. 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 31, 1885. 



NOTABILIA. 



Sam Oppenheimer of San Antonio, was one of the passengers on the 
San Saba stage, that was robbed a few weeks ago. "Shell out your 
money, or off goes your head," remarked one of the robbers, holding a 
pistol under Sam's nose. " Three hundred dollars vash every cent I got, 
so help me schiminy grashus." " Hand 'tn over." Sam did so, keeping 
back $6, " What are you keeping back them §0 for ?" mildly inquired 
the robber, pressing his pistol against Sam's head. " Mine Gott! don't 
you let a man take out two per cent, wheu he advances money mitout 
securities ?" asked Sam. —Texas Sif tings. 

On opening a bead of cabbage, the other day, the cook of a hotel at 
Lockport N. Y., found a document stating that the world would come 
to an end on the third day of July next. Predictions of that kind 
usually come from cabbage- head*, however, and P. J. Cassin & Co., 
Washington and Battery streets, will continue selling pure and unadulter- 
ated Liquors, in retail quantities, at wholesale rates. 

"Hello, Sam," said a gentleman to an old negro riding along on a, mule, 
"where did you get that beast?" "Ibuyed'im. in con'se ; yo' didn't 
tiuk I Btoled 'im, did yo'?" "I wasn't sure. What did you give for^ 
him ? " "I gib my note, sah, for fawty dollahs? " " Your note, Sam? " 
" In cou'se, sah! " " Why, you'll never pay it." " Cou'se I won't, boss. 
Yo' don't recon dat man specs I'se tjwine to pay for dat mule, an' pay for 
dat note, besides, does yo' ? No, sah, hit's as much as dis darkey kin do 
to pay fo' de mule." —Cleveland Sun. 

It fs probably false that one of the favorite songs of the Salvation 
Army now in our midst begins like this: "Oh, come down Sal— oh, come 
down S:il—<»h. come down Salvation, and have your picture taken by 
Bradley & llulofson, whose elegantly appointed gallery is located on the 
corner <>f Geary and Dupont streets. They rank among the leading pho- 
tographers of this wicked world." 

A richly-dressed man looked up from his newspaper at the Grand 
Pacific yesterday, and exclaimed to a person sitting near him: "This talk 
about hard times is all bosh. I never saw times hetter in my life, and I 
never made more money in a year than I did in 1884." "Is that so ? 
What is your business?" "I'm running a saloon in the prohibition State 
of Iowa." — Chicago Herald. 

Clergymen are complaining that fashionable parents do not send their 
children to Sunday school any more. The time may come when even 
Heaven will be regarded as not exclusive enough to to be fashionable. 
Swain'fl, No. 213 Sutter street, will continue to be the place where the 
elite will go for delicious lunches, ice-creams, confections, etc. 

A young gentleman who was pledged to take a young lady to a party, 
remarked on the afternoon previous to the event that he was going home 
to take a sleep in order to be fresh. "That's right," she replied, " but 
don't sleep too long." "Why?" he asked. "Because," she answered, 
" I do not want you to be too fresh." 



' Because," she answered, 
-Columbus Dispatch. 

There is a woman in Connecticut who wear* a number nine shoe. 
When she sets her foot down, her husband walks around it and says, 
'■ Yessum ; I will — arise and proclaim from the housetops that the Im- 
perishable Paint, sold by J. R. Kelly & Co., Market street, goes three 
times as far as other paints, and is impervious to sun or rain." 

The simplicity of an anecdote is its chief charm. A recently-pub- 
lished book of anecdotes presents the following sample : "Down in 
Georgia, iu ante bellum days, th 're was au old sanctimoniously fied 
fellow who made bis negroes whistle while they were picking cherries, for 
fear they should eat some." — Chicago Inter Ocean. 

"Yes, my boy," said an old minister to his son, who was going out to 
do battle with the world, " be as wise as a serpent and as harmless as a 
dove ; but if you forget any part of this advice do not forget that part 
about being as wise as a serpent, and buying your Hats of White, No. 
014 Commercial street. His stock is large and fashionable. 

" I was rich once and drank wine," said a tramp, as he poured out 
a stiff drink of gio. *' When was that ? " demanded the bar-tendtr. "A 
good while ago," he replied, wiping away a tear. " Well, what are you 
crying about ? " " I am crying to think what a fool I was to drink wine 
when I might just as well have had gin." — Detroit Post. 

Stop that cough, by the use of Ayer's Cherry Pectoral— the best 
specific ever known for all diseases of the throat and lungs. It will soothe 
the rough feeling in your throat, give the vocal organs flexibility and vi- 
tality, and enable you to breathe and speak clearly. 

He was making a call and they were talking of literature. " ' The 
Pilgrim's Progress,' " she remarked, "always seemed to me painful. Of 
course, yon are familiar with ' Banyan ?' " He said he had one on each 
foot, and they bothertdhim a good deal. 

Ayer's Sarsaparilla wonderfully improves the complexion, and brings 
to old and young the bloom of health. As a purifier of the blood it has 
no < qual. 

Irascible Old Party— Conductor, why didn't you wake me up when 
I asked you ? I am miles beyond my station. Conductor — I did try, and 
all I could get out of you was: "All right, Maria. Get the children 
their breakfast and I'll be down in a minute." 

J. P. Cutter's Old Bourbon. —This celebrated Whisky is for sale by 
all first-class druggists and grocers. Trade mark — star within a shield. 

Wife to husband — "My dear, did you ever eat an Irish dish?" 
Hungry husband — "No, I never eat an Irish dish, nor a Dutch dish, 
either. If you haven't anything but dishes to eat, why don't you say so ? " 

Best Pictures taken at the Imperial Gallery, 724£ Market St., S. F. 

Yes, Longfellow is a poet, but all poets are not long fellows. In fact, 
poets are generally short — very short. — 0(7 City Derrick. 



A DAY IN MID-WINTER. 

Along the hills the pines are green, 

But dead leaves lie beneath the snow, 
And veering in the froBty air — 

The fleecy clouds are sailing low, 
I watch and note some laggard bird 

Winging his way to lands of palm, 
And in imagination trace 

The shores where sapphire seas lie calm. 
The naked apple boughs rise bare 

Against a cold and cheerless sky, 
And where the robin lately sang 

The chill wind moaning hurries by ; 
All that is left of Summer's bloom 

Is dead beyond our power to save 
Eternal laws in mercy framed ; 

Bind man and flower from birth to grave. 
0, life that is! O, life to come ! 

What record shall we bear to thee ? 
What deeds of love and duty done 

Shall brighten one Eternity? 
Some kindly word dropped by the way — 

For tottering forms and empty palms, 
A coin placed all unseen by men — 

In trembling hands outstretched for alms. 
And so when we no more shall walk 

Where dead leaves lie beneath our feet, 
Some lips may murmur o'er our rest 

A prayer to make our memory sweet. 
If Death then finds not empty hands, 

We may not pause where waters roll, 
And Christ's own smile forever be 

A benediction to the soul. Jeff. Henri Nones. 

CARD TO THE PUBLIC ! 

The Pacific Insurance Union Is the title of au organization, 
or " compact " (so called), of all the Foreign, Eastern and Local Fiie Insurance 
Companies represented in the State of California, with the exception of three Com- 
panies two Eastern and one Foreign. This Association has been but recently 
formed— its object being, in the main, to sustain and foster fixed andarbitrary rates 
of Fire Insurance Premiums (or, as defined bv Article 2 of its Constitution: "The 
Rkgi'lation of the bcsiKESS of Fire Insurance"), with the ungenerous and avowed 
determination, however, to stamp out, if practicable, any and all Fire Insurjnce 
Companies assuming to act independent of its Constitution and By-Laws. 

THE TRANSATLANTIC 

Fire Insurance Company of Hamburg, Germany, 

Is Not a Member or tbe " Pacific Insurance Union." 

Or in league with any Board or Association of Fire Insurance Companies whatever, 
but will continue, as it always has done, to pursue an independent, prompt and con- 
servative uouise in all its dealings with the Insuring public, and to issue its policies 
at such rates of premium as may be mutually agTeed upon and commensurate with 
the hazird, and, when advisable, allowing liberal rebates or commissions. The 
patronage of the Insuring public is therefore respectfully solicited for the TRANS- 
ATLANTIC FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY, which is an unquestionably reliable 
institution, and has been established for many years very successfully on this Coast- 
It has a capital of $1,500,000, a large part of which is invested in the United States, 
and holds reinsurance contracts with eleven other well and favorably known Euro- 
pean Fire Insurance Companies. 

GEO. MARCUS & CO., 

GENERAL AGENTS 

Transatlantic Fire Insurance Company of Hamburg, 

232 CALIFORNIA STREET. 

San Francisco, January, 1S85. 



FRUIT AND 

ORNAMENTAL, 



THEESI 

MAGNOLIAS, PALMS, 
Roses, Clematis, etc. 

A New Descriptive CATALOGUE OF FRUITS is now ready, containing many New 
and Rare Varieties. CATALOGUES will be sent: 

No. I— Fruits, Grapevines, Olives 4 Cents 

No. II- Ornamental Bare Plants 4 Cents 

No. Ill- New Roses and Clematis Gratis 

JOHKT B.OCK, 

San Jose, California. 



L. LANSZWEERT, 

nalytical and Consulting Chemist, 

i. San Francisco. 



360 Fourth street, 

July 7. 



Jitn. 31, 1885 



OAI,lh"ORNIA ADVERTISER. 



17 



REAL ESTATE TRANSACTIONS. 

fUcorded to the City and County of San Fruneleco. CaJifornla, for 
the Week ending January 87. 1886. 

■ • mpi'r ■ ■r.-nlh, Kteunhnfthe I :<nniiirrriat Aqtncv, 401 Ual\fon\ia St. , .S. K 
Wednesday, January 21«t. 



SRANTOK AMD QRANT1K. 



DBSCRirTION. 



A C Weber el »1 to Km Brannan.. 
City Ilk of Sav lo G W Friok ol si 



Gm w Prink i" M Kedor 

T Bell lo L Dnurtn. 



Same toB It Keith 

W Daley to Margt Weesling 
Mom; .si K K Co lo City 4 Co S F 

\V M N.-nhallto w II Miner 

W n Miner to W M Newnall 

JBarbat lo J H Barest 

Q W lllnckclto J Rock 

(' iJiurrvaud to J K Tajlor 

.1 F Bluniberg to A Wn^istein... 

G Grant to B Joosl 

J Flnck toHFinck 



II S Ten ' ronplclou N 17th. 310 w Nor. w 401100, bolni; In 
M B116 

9 Pine, 196:3 « Webster, <t 15x137:8— 
W \ 119 

N Hill. 101:1 if Church, w 50:111114. bo- 
Ing in M 1! 

Qlld one-half Same- 

N 18th, 3iW w Sanchez, w 86x114, being 
In M 11105 

E Noe. 100 • nib, e Mill 10, being In 
M B 105 

W J, rs.v, 2o0n 23rd, n 35x100, being 
j In P B 56 

New Montgomery street, from Market 
and Howard 

S Calllornia, 151:8 o Laguca, e 17:2 x 
1.17:0 -W A .97 

S California, 189e Lacuna, e 17:3x137:0 
W A 197 

N Pacillc, 107:6 w Powell, w 30, n 73, e 
lu. - 4- , w 10, s 30 to beg 

E Webster, 114:6 s Post, s 23x137:6, be- 
ing in YY A276 

Lots 30 and 37. block 7, University 
Mound Survey 

K Howard. 200 u 10th, n 60x125, bclug 
in M B33 

Lots 1 t,. II, block 8, Ploche and Rob- 
inson Snba 

Nw D street and 21st avenue, \v 240 x it 
1 incli-O L 4UI 



i 6 

6 

200 
100 

707 

1850 

6 

1 

10 
5 
5 
10 

mi 



Thursday, January 22nd. 



II B Murray lo Gertudc Murray.. 
W Meeks to J Edwards 



.1 Edwards to W N Meeks 

W N MeekS to Mary J Meeks . 



Sav & Ln Soc to Mary J Meeks 

T Bell to O D Baldwin 

E J Prlugle to J M Caldwell 



N 23rd, 275 e Guerrero, e 25x114, bein 
in II A 12 

No Hawthorne, 300 nw Harrison, nw 1:6 
Xll3:6-100-vara63 

Same 

Same 

A W Manning to Gertrude Rnytk-ld E Polk, '.12:6 s Eddy, 8 27:6x82:6. being 
in W A 7 

Ne Hawthorne, 175 nw Harrison, nw 2> 
x 112:6— 100-vara 118 

E Noe, IfHl n 18:h, n 35x110, being in 
inM B105 

W Dearborn Place, 238:8 s 17tb, e 32 x 

96:9-51 B70 

J M Caldwell to Martha Mnir ... .iSamo 

Htb Sav & Ln Soc to J Hurson E Buchanan, 135 n Greenwich, n 35 x 

10U:3-W A 247 

N Green, 170:6 e Leavenworth, e 45 x 
137:0 -50-vara 871 

N 16th, 140:10 e Guerrero, e 60x100, be- 
in M B36 

Sw 10th. 225 se Bryant, se 25x100, being 
in M B43 

Nc 3rd, 105 dw Bryant, nw 25x85, being 
in lu-vara85 

S Pino, lal:3 w Webster, w 25x127:6, be- 
ing in W A 312 

S Pt Lobos avenue, 21:9 w Parker ave- 
nue, w 23x100 

S Pt Lobos avenue, 24:9 w Parker ave- 
nue, w 52x100 

Se Florida and 21bI, e 1(10x260; bw Flor- 
ida and 31st, w 200x260 ; ne Harrison 
and 2lBt, n 520x460 ; se Harrison and 
Butte, e 401:3x408 

Ne Florida and 3Snd, e 300x260 ; nw 
Florida and 32nd, w 200x260 ; sw Bry- 
ant and 22nd. w 200x260 ; se Bryant 
and 22nd, s lb5, e 140 lo a point, w 50 
to begin • 

Se Bryant and Butte, e 300x403, ne Bry- 
ant and Butte, e 200x400 ; w Bryant, 
93 n 21st, u 427x200 

Sw Solano and Florida, s 400. w 404:3, 
n 275, e 124:3, n 125, e 280 to begin- 
ning 

Lots 7, 13, 14, 15, 21,22, 36,41,44, 46, 
67, 85 and 92 ; City Garden Property, 
MB17 

S 16th, 88 w Valencia, w 60x110, being 
in MB39 

Lota 14, 15, block 466; and lot 4. block 
433, Bay View Homestead 



.1 Alexander to Caroline Alexander 
F Roeding St al to A S Perley.. , 
R T Roberta et al to L Caylon. 

T Magce to n C Devening 

J I Wallace to Mary L Maxwell 

E Henderson to Mary Welsh 

J Henderson to Same 

M Morgenthan et al to J Center 



Same to S Crim,. 



Same to J Center et al ... 
Same to Clans Spreckela . 
W J Shaw toLGoltig... 



SMay to E Hall etal 

Annie Brady lo T M O'Conner 



1,000 

1 

Gift 

5,350 

2,200 

1,730 

10 
4,120 



Gilt 
5 
3,176 
3,500 
10 
10 
10 



10 
10 

10 

5 
10,000 
Grant 



Friday, January 23rd. 



Mary K Duane to E Duane 

K Duane to Mary K Dnane 

J Collins toO Prunty 

P F C Sander to F A Rouleau . 
A Borel to H Hendermar 

W Leviston to J S Klapperick . 

W Nicolto F H Bnrke 



T Bell to T J Mangan 

EHenderson to F B Wilde.. 
J Henderson to Same 



Se Naloma, 325 ne 7th, ne 50x75, being 
in KI0-vara240 

Se Natoma, 200 sw 6th, sw 25x75, being 
in 100-vara 227 ; Be Natoma, 1U0 ne 
7th, ne 25x75-100-vara 247 

Se Cleveland, 75 ne 7th, ne 25x75, being 
th 100-vara 250 

E Taylor, 75 n Green, n 62:6x68:9 

W Treat avenue, 135 s 35th, s 35x113:6, 
M B1S0 

Sw Washinglon avenne, 100 se Mission, 
Be 35x113:4— M B 3 

Nw 19th avenue and K street, w 340 x 

224-0 L760 

J W Ingram to H B Fish |S Vallejo, 66:9 e Hyde, e 16:9x48, being 

In 50-vara 1390 

N Ford. 176 w Sanchez, w 25x114, being 
in MB 105 

W Parker avenne, 100 8 Pt Lobos ave- 
nue, s 35x121 

Same 



1,(100 
500 



150 

500 

610 

10 
5 



Saturday, January 24th 



OK1NTOK A.Nn ORAHTKB. 



II I) Baldwin to Marguenh Wolf, 

Harriet A lllake to ,1 Solandtt .... 

M McCloskeyto Mar, A HcOlosksj 

J Klnuenoe to Maiy Cuskcr 

W II Miller lo Anna D Miner 

J O'ltcilly to Mary Lambeit 

Lizzie Williams to Geo Williams.. 

Geo William, to Kate Williams... . 
Mary E Fuller to T J Dulgimn 



liKacBimov 



S 171h, IM e Noe, e MllH, bring In M 
Block 100 



N Tyler, 194:1] O lit avenue, e 25x187:6 

W A :*: 



W Fnlroin, 42:3 n 3-lrd, u 93:8x80, belnl 

in M II 112 

S Glover, 08:8 e LeaveD worth, e 3lnli" 
:,"-, aril SS7 

B California, 189:3 e Lagoon, a W:8 * 

137:6 -W A 197 



s i-ili, hki w lloloriB, w 2 xlll. being 
In II A 55 



N Clementina, 275 w 5th, w 50x76-100- 
\ara 201, 20.7 

Same 

Lot 10, block 11, University Mound 
Survey 



price 



Monday, January 26th. 



Amanda Arnold lo F II Wulzcn. 

Razzo to Rebecca J Gordon 

W B Swain lo J J McGuc 

MQuinlan to E F Quinlan 



City and Co in Ellen Nugent . 



Ellen Nugent to City and Co.. 
A Borel to US Doyle 



Same to J Sims 

Sumc tu M Brady 

Same to J Dolan 

Same to FA Potior 

J B McGee to Ann Bailey . 



U Bailey to F H Burke 

E Hawthorne to WU Warden.... 



O McMahon to J C Bateman — 

J Murphy to Same 

S L Jones to S J Downing 

J Healing to J Ruegg 

V E Ellie to Rebecca V Kissling 

W Frank to A Bcrelta 

A Borel to W F Klein 

G W Hlnkelto R W Hillard.... 



E Fair Oaks, 111 s 23rd. s 31. e 13'.:S, ne 

35:1: w 137:7 to beginning, being In 

IIA27 

Lots 4 toll, hlk 20. West End Map No 1; 

subject to mortgage 16,000 

Se Sanchez and 35lh. c 101:111x114, belnit 

InUADO 

S Duncan. 125 e Church, e 25X109-H A 

59; s 38th, 175 e Church, e 25x114- 

H A 55 

E Florida, 284 n 23rd, u 26x100, beiug 

In M 11157 

Streets, etc 

W Treat avenue, 200 s25tb, s 50x112:6- 

M B18I 

IV Treat avenue, 171:6 u 26tli, n 2l:il X 

112:6-M B 180 

W Treatavciiue, 73:6n 26th, n 24:6x112: 

6-M B 180 

EFolsom,75e 31th, s 35x113:6. being 

in MB 180 

E Folsom, 137:6 s 35th, a 37:6x112:6, be- 
ing in M B ISO 

S Bush, 62:6 w Mason, w 35x87:6, being 

in 50-vura 192 

Same 

Nw Mission, 342:6 no 3rd, ne 40:6x30- 

ll)ll-vnra9 

S Broadway, 137:6 w Gotigh, w 60x90- 

W A161 

Beg 90 8 Broadway, and 137:6 w Gough, 

s 30 x w 55— W a 161 

Lot 8, hlock 5, Railroad Homestead As- 
sociation 

N 21st, 105 e Church, o 50x114, being in 

MB88 "... 

S Pine, 100 e Dupont, e 20x60, being In 

50- vara 386 

N Bush, 137:6 w Buchanan, w 34:4x137: 

6-W A 373 

W Trent avenue, 122:6 n 26lh, n 24:6 X 

112:6 M B 180 

Se Webster and Post, s 24:6x89:6, being 

in W A 276 



»i,ono 
coo 

G.ll 

3,000 

Gift 

Gift 

1 
5 



*2,150 
8,000 
1,500 

6110 
.... 

1,615 

1,785 

780 

875 

1,41X1 

6,500 
5,400 



1 
5 
1,225 
4,700 
S,'i00 
10 
3,100 



Tuesday, January 27th. 



H F StraBBcr to Lisetle K Strasser 

E Burns to Sarah Burns 

J Whetton to Elizth Brown 



Ne Fillmore and Kale, n 24x81:3, being 
in W A 294 

W Capp. 275 n 32nd, n 3(1x112:6, being 
inM B64 

S Lombard, S3 e Gough, e 111:10. Be 68: 
7, sw 83:11, nw 56:3, n 17:6, e 3, n 58:6 
to beg 

W Lapidge, 995 n 19th, n 25x80, being 
in M B71 

S Pacific, 80 w Polk, w 54, 8 127:8, e 12:6 
n 37:8, e 43:6, n 90 to beg, being in 
W A50 

Assignment fur benefit of creditors 

Nw Isis. 132:5 sw 12th, sw 26:2, nw 75, 
ne 27:11, sc 75 to beg— M B 17 

Lots 10, 10>f, block 266, O'Neil and 
Haley tract 

N ElliB, 91:8 e Larkin, e 40x137:0, being 
in 50-vara 1425 

STnrk, 210:6 e Lyon, e 11:6x137:6, be- 
ing in W A 506 

Nw Green and Lagunn.n 100x125, being 
in W Addn 

Nw Green and Laguna, w 50x100, being 

in W Addition 

A J Christie to J G Klnmpke lLots 3 and 4, block 167, University 

I HonieBtend 



JC Lane to L F Chandler 

St Luke's Church to Amy C Ashe. 



A M Pearlman to A S Pearlman 

L GottigtoJ Foley 



Ann O'Neil to C Snllivan 

B B Kennedy to Cntu Kennedy... 
Margt Randolph to T J O'Brien . 
H H Reynolds to H M Leonard . . . 
H M Leonard to W P Lenrestey. 



* 1 

Gift 

5 

2,'i00 

3,600 
1 

740 

2,500 

G ft 

450 

5 

3,500 

40 



DR. LORYEA'S NEW HA MM AM, 

218 Po«t Street. Between Dopout and Stockton Streets. 

The Most Luxurious'and Complete Turkish, Russian, Electric and Medicated Bath- 
house in this city, Open Day and Night. 

Single Batns, $1.00. Twelve Tickets, 810.00. 

AMERICAN EXCHANGE HOTEL, 

SANSOME STREET, COR. HALLECE, SAN FRANCISCO. 

This hotel is in the very center of the businees portion of the city, and has been 
renovated and newly furnished throughout. The traveling public will find this to 
be the most convenient as well as the most comfortable and respectable hotel, in the 
city TABLE FIRST CLASS. Boardand Room, SI, $1 25 and SI 50 per day. Nice 
Single Rooms, per night, 50 cents. Breakfasts or Dinners, 50 cents. Lunch, 25 
Cents. Eighteen Tickets, good for any meals, |6. Hot and Cold Baths, free. Free 
Coach to and from the hotel. April 12. 



IS 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Jan. 31, 1885. 



CRADLE, ALTAR AND TOMB. 



CRADLE. 

Brows— In this city, Jan. 27, to the wife of W. W. Brown, a son. 

BhNDBL-In this city, Jan. 22, to the wife of Louis Bendet, a son. 

EBANOn— In this city, Jan 15, to the wife of Jean Bernou, a son. 

Burns— In this city, Jan. 18, to the wife of John H. Burns, a daughter. 

Casavax— In this city, Jan. 21, to the wife of P. F. Canavan, a daughter. 

Ciiasdlky -In this city, Jan. 26, to the wife of James H. Chandley, a son. 

Douglas — In this city, Jan. 23, to the wife of Andrew Douglas, a son. 

FRANKLIN— In this city, Jan. 20, to the wife of M. Franklin, a son. 

FORBBBLL— In this city, Jan. 24, to the wife of John A. Forssell, a daughter. 

Frbsb— In this city, Jan. 25, to the wife of J. H Frese, a son. 

Griffin— In this city, Jan. 19, to the wife of B. Griffin, a daughter. 

Gl QQKNH1HR— In this city, Jan. 25, to the wife of L. Guggenhime, a daughter. 

HARMS— In this city, Jan. 24, to the wife of Ben Harris, a daughter. 

HlLDBBRASD— In this city, Jan. 19, to the wife of George Hildebrand, a sou. 

HORTRR - In this city, Jan. 27, to the wife of E. L. Hueter, a daughter. 

Jciuv— In this city, Jan. 23, to the wife of A. Jory, a daughter. 

Kittekman— In this city, Jan. 20, to the wife uf James Kitteroiau, a son. 

KITS— In this city, Jan. 23, to the wife of James Kite, a son. 

KENDALL-In this city, Jan. 27, to the wifeof Valentine Kendall, a son. 

LkwestuaIj— In this city, Jan. 22, to the wife of J. W. Lewenthal, a son. 

Lyons— In this city, Jan. 21, to the wife of Andrew J. Lyons, a son. 

Mack — In this city, Jan. — , to the wife of Thomas Mace, a son. 

Markf.l-Iti this "city, Jan 17, to the wifeof John L. Markel, a son. 

McGann— In this city, Jan. 20, to the wife of Thomas McGann, a son. 

Nrddbrbbn— In this city, Jan. 10, to the wife of Charles H. Neddersen, a son. 

BOUNRR -In Pike City, Sierra co., Jan. 13, to the wife of C. T. Rouner, a daughter. 

Wilson— In this city, Jan. 21, to the wife of Ft. G. Wiison, a son. 

ALTAR. 

BlGOT-WKLcn— Jan. 21, William J. Biirgv to Mamie E. Welch, both of this city. 
Bryant-Johnson— Jan. 26, Charles Oliver Bryant to Mrs. Delia A. Johnson. 
Cakter-Dr Couhcy— Dec 10, Colonel John F. Carter, of Philadelphia, to Harrie 

De Courcy, of this city. 
Coiikn-Dhsx— Jan. 2(J, Albert Cohen to Alice Dunn. 
Cohen-Labbl— Jan. 25, Leopold Cohen to Laura Label, both of this city. 
DlBTRlCB-PlBROY— Jan. 20, Albert Dietrich to Lottie A. Piercy. 

Ki.us-Mbyer— Jan. 2:>, Nathan Ellis, of Phcenix, A. T., to Fannie Meyer, of this city. 
Eishbr-Pomis— Jan. 25, Herman Fisher to Tahoe Pomiti. 
Fisiier-Zollmann— Jan. 24, Joseph Fisher to Mary Zollmann. 
Hackkr-Kiehl— Jan. 25, Bernard Hacker to Jennie Kiehl. 
BUusbaw-Rbnbtzrrt— Jan. 23, James Hamshaw to Minnie A. Renetzkey. 
Kbssiso-McEntee— Jan. 24, John F. Kessing to Gertrude C McEntee. 
Lakin-Jamesox— Jan. 25, Joseph Likin to Minnie Jameson. 
[/)sg— Anderson — Jan. 22, Joachim Long to Hilda Anderson. 
Litchfield-Fr itch— Jan. 22, Joseph M. Litchfield to S. Lizzie Fritch. 
Mkrzbach-Levinoston— Jan. 27, Felix H. Merzbach to Eva Levingston. 
MITCHBLL-COOTBT— Jan. 20. William F. Mitchell to Nellie E. Cootey. 
Nolan-Wrioiit— Oct. 31, David A. N Ian to Lillian Wright. 

POGHBW-STBRDMAM— Jan. 24, Hilaire Puchew to Jessie Steedman, both of this city. 
Rothschild-Falk — Jan. 27, Louis Henry Rothschild to Minnie Falk. 
Rkagas-Dlike— Jan. 18, Harry Reagan to Mattie R. Duff. 
Stdrs-EraoS— Jan. 28, E. E. Sturs to Ida M. Kraus, both of this city. 
Smitli-Bi'RNS— Jan. 11, William Smith to Mary Burns. 
Sal/.-KujUiax— Jan. 21, Edward Salz to Tilly Kullman. 
Taylor-Kittle— Jan.'— , William H. Taylur to Bessie G. Kittle. 
TnoMFSON"-M»ORE— Jan. 27, C? plain W. Thompson to Minnie Moore. 

TOMB. 

Alpack— Jan. 26, Joseph Aldack, a native of Germany, aged 30 yrs.,6m. and 3 days. 

Anobr— Jan. 24, Sarah Anger, a native of California, aged 21 years. 

Bowlkn —Jan. 38, William Edwin Bowlen, aged 17 days. 

Burns -Jan. 26, James H. Bums, aged 26 years. 3 months and 21 days. 

Berwick— Jan. 21, William B. Berwick, a native of Scotland, aged 67 years. 

Bi'cklkv — Jan. 23, Michael Buckley, a native of Ireland, aged St) years. 

OOMBTOCK— Jan. 28, Edward Osgood Comstock, aged 6 months. 

OroWlby— Jan- — , Ellen Crowley, a native of Ireland, aged 60 years. 

CROWN— Jan, 29, Wolff, husband of Esther Crown, aged 68 years. 

Olembst— Jan. 26, Desire Clement, a native of France, aged 37 years. 

Collins— Jan. 25, James Collins, aged 35 years. 

Collins— Jan. 26, Joseph J. Collins, a native of Ireland, aged 35 years. 

Crimmins— Jan. 25, Frank Crimmins, aged 18 years, 7 months and 16 days. 

Clock.BR- Jan. 26, Henry Clocker, a native of Denmark, aged 74 years. 

COFFIN —Jan. 22, George Coffin, aged 72 years and 6 months. 

Cihley— Jan. 24, Patrick Curley, a native of Ireland, aged 43 years, 

Cunningham— Jan. 24, Thomas Cunningham, a native of Ireland, aged 30 years. 

CabsbN— Jan. 22, Lena Cassen, a native of Germany, aged 53 years. 

OoNCANNON — Jan. 27, Patrick Concannou, a native of Ireland, aired 54 years. 

DbshonD — Jan. 25, Michael Desmond, a native of Ireland, aged 35 years. 

Daley— Jan. 26, Av.nie, wife ef Frank Daley, a native of Ireland, aged 52 years. 

Ddffey— Jan. 26, Mrs. Catherine Duffey, aged 72 years and 9 months. 

DgNNINO— Jan. 28, Maria I Denning, a native of Portland, Me., aged 68 years. 

DbnnB*— Jan. 26, S. D. Denney, a native of New York, aged 78 years. 

Ducy — Jan. 28, Edmund Ducy, a native of Ireland. 

Esbrro— Jan. 25, Alice Esberg, aged 5 years, 8 months and 1 day. 

Florian— Jan. 28, Louis Florian, a native of France, agsd 85 years. 

Flysn— Jan. 25, James P. Flynn, aged 21 years. 

Flaijaut— Jan. — , Albert A. Flahaut, aged 21 years, 5) months and 5 days. 

Ford— Jan 26, Mary Ford, a native of Ireland, aged 27 years. 

Hi'CK— Jan. 23, Richard Huck, aged 11 years, 9 months and 13 days. 

Hrrmida— Jan. 25, Willie Hermida, aged 15 years and 4 days. 

HonoE— Jan. 23, Chris Hodge, a native of Boston, aged 23 years and 8 months. 

JOHNSON — Jan. — , Bridget Johnson, a native of Ireland, aged 59 years. 

Kaplan— Jan. 24, Albert W. Kaplan, aged 22 years and 4 months. 

Kratzkr— Jao. 25, John Kratzer, a native of Germany, aged 55 years 

Lyman -Jan. 24, Maggie Lyman, a native of Mauch Chunk, Pa., aged 34 ys., 6mos. 

Lewis— Jan. 27, Hannah Lewis, a native of Ireland, aged 64 years, 

Morris— in Chinese Camp, Jan. 26, A. Morris, a native of Germany, aged 55 yeaw. 

Millkh -Jan. 23, George Miller. 

Martin— Jan. 25, Frank Martin. 

McCartiiey— Jan. 19, Mary J. McCarthey, aged 19 years. 

McGrath— Jan. 27, Lawrence McGrath, a native of Ireland, aged 32 years. 

O'Rjly— Jan. 22, James O'Rily, a native of Ireland, aged 36 years. 

O'Keeke- Jan. 26, Hannah O Keefe, aired 3 months. 

PlCHON— Jan. 23, Jeanne E. Pichon, aged 3 years, 6 months and 16 days. 

Rasmussen— Jan. 27, Emily Ca - o ine Rasmussen, aged 10 months and 15 days. 

Rogers- Jan. a3, Mrs. Mary Rogers, a native of Ireland, aged 52 years. 

Rosmer— Jan. 35, Emilie He'ene Roemer, aged 2 years, 1 mouth and 20 days. 

BUHSBLL -Jan. 22, Lulu Russell. 

Riley — Jan. 21, John Riley, aged 36 years 

Reyes— Jan. 22, Clara Reyes, a^ed 48 years. 

Sciii'Q— Jan. 24, Elizabeth M. Schug, aged 10 years, 1 month and 16 days. 

Scott— Jan, 23, Margaret Scott, aged 5 months, 

Tiial— Jan. 26, Leon C. Thai, a native of San Francisco, aired 27 years and 3 months. 

Valleuo— Jan. 24, Nellie Vallero, a native of New York, aged 19 years and 11 mos. 

Woods— Jan. 25, Teresa M. Woods, a native of New York, aged 2i years. 

Wilkcns— Jan. 26, Mathias Wilkens, aged 49 years, 9 months and 6 days. 



A BRUTAL CAPTAIN. 

Readers of the local daily papers were indignantly surprised and 
shocked at published accounts of the manner in which the master of the 
British ship Sierra Blanca treated the drowning of the little apprentice 
boy, Sutherland Mackay. The News Letter, after a very careful invest- 
igation into the facts of the case, feels fully justified in expressing an 
opinion as to the truth of the original statement made in the Aita. It 
was correct in every particular, and, in fact, we are in formed by a reliable 
person who was present during the interview at the North Harbor Police 
Station, that it was not strong enough in detail to delineate in its darker 
shades the feeling of horror created in the minds of the listeners by such 
palpable inhumanity. The subsequent retraction of the article to which 
we refer amounts to nothing; it was simply one of the peculiar idiosyn- 
crasies of some newspaper proprietors, who can easily adapt them- 
selves to the practice of opening one eye and closing the ot'ier when the 
question of self-interest crops up. The gentleman in question must have 
known, when he published the original article, that the sum and substance 
of it was correct, and yet he has retracted it at the nod and beck of the 
autocrat De Grouchy, who probably imagines that the very soil of this 
city trembles beneath his tread like the planking of his quarter-deck, or 
that people here will quake and shiver in their boots in his august pres- 
ence like a crowd of bulldosed seamen. 

What was the unhappy fate of a poor young lad in the eyes of the 
great DeGrouchy. Plenty more to be had on the ship's return. This 
boy, confided by loving and probably well to do parents, with a wealthy 
firm acting as his guardian through the agency of their employe*, actually 
begrudged a decent burial, and sought by parsimonious greed to be 
thrown by public charity into a pauper's grave. This young stranger, 
meeting his untimely fate in the path of duty, under circumstances which 
would naturally invoke the sympathies of every heart worthy the name 
of human, must forsooth arouse the venal fears of one standing in the 
place of a parent, that the sea might give up his victim, and a wealthy 
firm be called upon to pay a funeral bill. 

Such an action on the part of a British ship-master seems incredible. 
As a general rule, no other class of men we meet with have larger hearts 
or more generous feelings. Beady at all times to aid their fellows in dis- 
tress, and sympathetic to an extreme which often leads beyond the 
bounds of prudence, one can readily imagine their opinion of this case, 
were they fully convinced that the facts were true. We say they are in 
every particular, and say it with a sincere regret that we feel bound, in 
justice to the weak and friendless, to comment on the subject in such un- 
favorable terms. Captain De Grouchy can rest assured that, should the 
sailor lad be unfortunately recovered from his honorable grave, there are 
enough of his fellow-apprentices, under the British flag in this harbor, to 
give him a respectable burial. Were there not, we have a British Consul 
in this port, who might probably have something to say in the matter. 
English shipping-firms generally take a special pride in their apprentice 
boys. It is from their ranks they select the officers, who advance under 
a fostering care, step by step, into command. Seldom it is, indeed that 
such a slur has been cast upon the class. One of the boys of an employ 
chucked into a pauper's grave, and two ships of the firm being iu port. 
The idea is too repugnant to contemplate. The suggestion coming from 
such a source is worse. 

GAME BIRDS OF CALIFORNIA.— NO. 3. 
The Dove (Columbia Passerina). — Although the dove is not strictly 
speaking agarae bird, as we rind it quoted as such in the California Game 
Laws, it shall be treated as one. The dove is too well known to need 
any description as to color, etc., and is almost identical with the ground 
dove of the Southern States. During early Summer these birds visit 
California in large numbers, breeding and raising their young here; when 
Winter approaches, however, they travel southward. Some few isolated 
cases remain here all Winter. The shooting of doves commences July 1st 
and ends February 2Sth. Even this is somewhat early to shoot them, as 
the young are seldom hatched out before well into August. Doves are 
particularly fond of thistle and wild sunflower seeds, and are sure to be 
found close to water about noontime and sundown. Their flight, wheu 
once on the wing, is exceedingly swift, and it requires a good shot to 
make a bag. When flushed out of stubble they are easy to kill, as they 
do not get their line of flight at once, as do quail. Doves are excellent 
eating, and are preferred by many to quail. The best way to cook them 
is in a pie. This should be eaten cold, and is superior to that made from 
domestic squabs. No hunting dog likes to retrieve doves, for the fluffy 
feathers get up their nostrils and between their teeth, and many a 
promising pup has got a sickener of retrieving by his first experience on 
doves. Doves can be found during the season within a few miles of San 
Francisco, and San Mateo, Napa, Marin, Solano, Sonoma, and other 
handy counties afford excellent sport to the dove-shooter. The dove 
builds a rough nest of sticks and a few leaves, and sometimes chooses a 
tree, but more frequently the ground, for such a purpose. It never raises 
more than two young ones at a time, but often breeds twice in a season. 



An Interesting Exhibit.— In the show-windows of Messrs. Snow & 
Co., 12 Post street, may be seen a display of oil paintings, by the well- 
known artist, Mr. Norton Bush. The artist seems to have turned his at- 
tention largely to decorative art, for in the display are to be seen a large 
number of beautifully-decorated parlor Bci-eena of all sizes, from the reg- 
ular mantel screen to the large three- foldings for room-division use. We 
do not remember having seen Mr. Bush's work to better advantage than 
in these screens. The rich, tropical foliage, which he so much delights 
in painting, seems peculiarly adapted to such fittings, aud really make 
the richest screens ever seen in this market. Mr. Bush intends holding 
an auction sale of all his works at an early day. 

"How many calls did your sister have, yesterday?" asked Miss 
Fixup, as she met little Johnny Toughnut on the street. "None." 
"What, not any?" " Nary one. Ye see, she got all ready for 'em, and 
had a lot o' cake all baked and lots o' oysters fixed up bully, an' I jist 
sneaked out and hung a basket on the front door. We're havin* cake an^ 
oysters fur every meal now. It's a cold day when I git left on cake an' 
oysters." 

It is a wonder that firemen are not always taking cold, because they so 
frequently get water in their hose. —Texas Siftings. 



2J 

/ 



Jan. 31, 1 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISKK 



19 



HOW? 

II iw can a man on a .l-IIar a day 

Charter a s«at at a popular play. 

And purchaae cigars and tobacco, pray ? 

He can't. 
How can h* -|>.Tt an elegant tile, 
A-k hi* d«u Drlfloda t<> step out for a "smile," 
And stable a two-forty animile? 

He can't. 
How buy perfumery, handkerchiefs too, 
The edges all ataniptnt with ft red kangaroo, 
And change linen ooffa every Sunday or two? 

He can't. 
How can he claim his dear girl's slender hand 
And circle her ringer with glittering band, 
When his check-book's so weak it scarcely can stand? 

He can't. 
How can he marry nnd furnish a wife 
With the many small comforts which sweeten this life? 
We must state the cold truth though it cuts like a knife- 
He can't. —Life, 

A STREAK OF FORTUNE. 

Two Son Franciscans who got a Slice of the Big Prize.— A stout, 
blonde young man, with just the suspicion of a mustache, light-brown 
hair and blue eyes, hardly more than twenty-three years of age, stood 
behind the counter of the Eintracbt saloon, on California street, below 
Kearny, yesterday forenoon, serving out beer and cigars to the patrons 
oi the Douse. 

"A glasa of beer, please," said a reporter. When the white-topped 
liquid was placed on the bar the blonde young man was invited and ac- 
cepted au iuvitation to join in a libatiot. 

" What has become of the man who was employed here named Tischer, 
who just van (15,000 in The Louisiana State Lottery? " asked the report- 
er. *' I exi^ect he's given up his place here long ago, hasn't he ? " 

" My name is Paul Tischer," replied the barkeeper, "and it doesn't 
look as if I bad given up my place, does it ! " 

The reporter admitted that it did not and expressed surprise that 
Tischer continued in his occupation after falling into such an extraordi- 
nary piece of good luck. 

"Well, you see it did not turn my head, as many expected that it 
would," said Tischer. "Of course I was greatly surprised at tirst and 
could hardly believe my good luck, but I don't intend to make a fool of 
myself over the matter. The greater portion of the fifteen thousand dol- 
lars I have deposited in bank, and it will remain there until I can find a 
good chance for investment. I have no definite plans as to what busi- 
ness 1 shall go into as yet, but I will find something before long." 

" How did you first learn that 58,282 had drawn the capital prize? " 

"A friend of mine named Ben Cohen brought me the news on the 
morning after the drrwing. You see he lives in the same house (711 Cal- 
ifornia street.) with me and Henry Levy, who held another cupon and 
also drew $15,000. Levy was in here talking to Cohen and me, when a 
man came in, and after ordering some beer asked us if we didn't want to 
buy two coupons in The Louisiana Lottery. He said they were the last 
he had. I refused at first, but Levy bought one for $1.25, so I took the 
other. Cohen knew the numbers, and when the number of the capital 
prize was telegraphed on here he rushed up and let me know. I didn't 
do much work that day, though, but I got over my excitement the next 
day and have been attending to business ever since." 

"What business is Mr. Levy in?" 

" He is a stock-broker and pretty well known. He took his good luck 
very philosophically. The first thing he did when the money arrived was 
to make Ben Cohen a present of $700 for having been the first to tell him 
that his ticket had won. Levy is worth considerable money — $40,000 or 
$50,000 — and of course his winnings did not look half as great to him as 
mine did to me. I didn't forget Ben Cohen either. To the man who 
sold me the ticket I offered a present of $150, but be would not take it, 
and said he ought to get at least $500. Of course I was under no obliga- 
tion to pay him a cent, and I think I was acting fairly in offering him 
$150." 

"How did you get your tickets cashed?" 

" Levy and I took our cupons to Wells, Fargo & Co.'s and had them 
insured. The tickets were sent on to New Orleans and the company col- 
lected the $30,000 and charged us $150 for the service." 

Mr. Tischer was congratulated on his good luck and the reporter then 
started in quest of Mr. Levy. That fortunate individual was found on 
the corner of California and Leidesdorff streets negotiating with a well- 
known capitalist for a block of gas stock. When this conference was 
ended Mr. Levy was asked if it was true that he had drawn $15,000 in 
The Louisiana State Lottery. 

Mr. Levy, who is an Alsatian by birth, something under forty years of 
age, appeared to be somewhat taken aback at first, but said: "Ain't I 
ever to hear the last of that? Of course I drew $15,000, but what do you 
want to know for ? " 

It was explained that, as there was so much talk about the various per- 
sons in San Francisco who had drawn large sums, it would be interesting to 
know just who had drawn prizes ard the amounts so drawn. 

" Well," said Mr. Levy, "I had a coupon which drew one tenth of the 
capital prize of $150,000. I have not the coupon now, but I have got the 
$15,000, which is a great deal better." 

" You cannot very well have the $15,000," said the reporter, "as I 
have beard that the first thing you did was to give $700 of it to the man 
who told you that your ticket had won." 

Mr. Levy laughed heartily and said, "well, that is true." 

" What are you going to do now? " 

" Well," said Mr. Levy, " I am going to take a trip to France in a Bhort 
time to visit my old home. What 1 will do when I come back I cannot 
say. San Francisco appears to have been a favorite city with fickle for- 
tune, as I am told more prizes in The Louisiana State Lottery were won 
here than in any other city in the United States." 

— San Francisco (Cal.) Chronicle an. 4. 



CALIFORNIA SUCAR REFINERY, 

OFFICE, 327 MARKET IHTItEKT HKHNEKY, i-ontl .no. 

CLAU8 BPR80KBL8 it. -i.l. nt 

J. D. BPBJMKBLB 

A. B. SPHECKBLS & 

WM. T. COLEMAN & CO., 

SHIPPING AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS. 

Represented by: 
AGENCY OK AGENCY OP 

WM. T. COLEMAN & CO., WM. T. COLEMAN & CO., 

32 KIVER STREET. Flavel's Warehouse, 

Chicago, iiu b. Astoria, Orogoa. 

MR. EUGENE E. JONE, 

4 BISHOPSGATE STREET WITHIN, 

LONDON, E. C. 

San Francisco and New York. 

H. B. Williams. a. Chkhkbrodoii. W. h. Dimond. 

WILLIAMS, DIM0ND & CO., 

SHIPPING AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS, 

UNION BUILDING JUNCTION MARKET AND PINE STREETS. 

Agents lor Pacific Mail Steamship Company, Pacific Steam Navigation Company, 
The Cunard Royal Mail Steamship Company, "The California Line of Clippers,™ 
from New York and Boston, and " The Hawaiian Line." March 22. 



E. L. G. STEELE & CO. 

(Successors to C. ADOLPHE LOW 4 CO.), 

Shipping and Commission Merchants, 

— AGENTS: — 

American Sugar Refinery and Washington Salmon Cannery, 

Corner of Union and Battery streets, 

SAN FKANCISCO. 



H. M. NEWHALL & CO., 

GENERAL SHIPPING AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS, 
NO. 309 SANSOME STREET, 

[Jan. 12.] SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA. 

H. L. DonoE. L. H. Swekxey. J. E. Rugqles. F. W. Van Sicklen. 

DODGE, SWEENEY & CO., 

Wholesale J?vovisioii Dealers and 

Commission Merchants, 

114-116 MARKET, AND 11-13 CALIFORNIA ST. 

Sole Agents for " Libby, McNeill & Libby's CANNED MEATS," "II. M. Dupee's 
CHICAGO HAMS." P. O. BOX 1242. 

SAVAGE, SON & CO., 

EMPIRE FOUNDRY AND MACHINE WORKS 
Nos. 135 to 143 Fremont street, 

SAN FRANCISCO, 

Manufacturers of STEAM ENGINES, SAWMILL MACHINERY, CABLE-ROAD 

CASTINGS, CJUARTZ-WORK and ARCHITECTURAL IRON GOODS. 

jj® - Estimates Free. August 2. 

DR. RICORD'S RESTORATIVE PILLS. 

Buy None bat the Genuine; a Specific for Exhausted Vital- 
ity, Physical Debility, Wasted Forces, etc. Approved by the Academy of 
Medicine, Paris, and by Medical Celebrities of the World. 

AGENTS for California and the Pacific States, J. G. STEELE & CO., 635 Market 
street (Palace Hotel), Bin Francisco. 
Sent by Mail or Express anywhere. 

Prices Reduced. 

Box of fifty, $1 25; of one hundred, $2 00; of two hundred, $3 60; of four 
hundred, $0 00. Preparatory Piiis, §2 00. 
g^T" Send for Circular. Oct. 4. 

F. DANERI & CO., 

— DEALERS IK — 

WINES, LIQUORS, GROCERIES, 

27 and 29 California Street, 

[Dec. 15.] Between Davis and Druram, SaD Francisco. 

SELBY SMELTING AND LEAD COMPANY, 

416 Montgomery Street San Franolsoo 

Gold and Silver Refinery and Assay Office. 

Highest Prices Paid for Gold. Silver and Lead Ores and Sulphurets. Manufac- 
turers of BLUESTONE. Also, Lead Pipe, Sheet Lead, Shot, etc. This Company 
has the best facilities on the Coast for working- GOLD, SILVER and LEAD in their 
various forms. 

June 18. PRENTISS SELLBY, Superintendent. 



COKE CHEAPEST FUEL. 

Reduction In Price : Wholesale JPrlce, 50 cents per barrel ; 
Retail Price, 60 cents per barrel, at the works of the SAN FRANCISCO GAS- 
LIGHT COMPANY, Howard and First streets, and foot of Second st. Jan. 12. 



20 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Jan. 31, 1885. 



COMMENTS ON FOREIGN AFFAIRS. 

The explosions which took place in London on last Saturday prove 
the accuracy of the prediction so often made in this column, to the effect 
that it was a mere question of time when the organized conspiracy 
against life and property, which was causing the occasional explosions of 
dynamite in England from time to time for some months past, would suc- 
ceed in accomplishing some serious result. The agency used is one of re- 
markable power, and heretofore the conspirators have only been foiled 
in their wicked purposes by tbeir arrant cowardice and clumsy stupidity, 
circumstances which accident was liable to overcome at any moment. 
Indeed, it is questionable whether the worst has yet been reached, for, 
unless the conspiracy is stamped out, fresh efforts in the same direction 
will doubtless be made, and the chances of stamping it out at the present 
time are decidedly slim. It is stronger to-day than it ever was, because 
the partial success it has achieved in the accomplishment of a brutal pur- 
pose has delighted the brutal natures who compose it and who support it. 
At the present time it is a conflict between organized society and its 
criminal elements, in which the criminals apparently have the whip hand. 

Who is responsible for this cowardly outrage in which the 
lives of so many innocent people were menaced, fourteen 
persons cruelly injured, and much valuable property destroyed? 
The ordinary observer will at once reply: The dynamite wing 
of the Fenians. In a restricted senBe, the reply would be 
correct. In the wider sense, it would be incorrect. The dyna- 
miters are little more than the explosive they employ. Of them- 
selves they could exist but a short time. They simply represent the 
brutal instincts of a large section of the Irish people. By this class they 
are supported both financially and morally. The time has come for plain 
talk upon this point. The writer can put his finger upon dozens of Irish- 
men right here in this city who are in affluent circumstances, who 
posture as Christian gentlemen of refinement and culture, and who are 
morally guilty of these shocking Irish crimes which thrill the civilized 
wurld with horror. It is true that they may contribute no money 
towards effecting them ; it is true that they may not be members of tbe 
organization which has charge of them ; it is true that in a mild way they 
depreciate each incident as it occurs ; but it is equally true that they are 
heart and soul in favor of tbe repulsive sentiments, hopes, and aims which 
these outrages are committed in behalf of and that this sideway moral 
support goes a long way towards producing the results they pretend to 
deplore. We are not speakiDg idly on this point. The facts stare 
every one in the face. The events which followed the assassin- 
ation of Lord Cavandish and Mr. Burke tore the mask from 
many a face. When Gladstone passed the repression bill, an ex- 
traordinary bill, designed to meet an extraordinary occasion, 
which menaced the rights of no honest man, but which 
made the walking very bad for criminals, this genteel, refined, intellectual 
class of Irishmen were furious. When Carey turned Queen's evidence 
and gave the authorities a chance to punish a portion of the assassins, 
they denounced him in unmeasured terms — not because he had been 
guilty of murder, but because he had rendered a partial measure of 
retributive justice a possibility. When O'Donnell shot Carey they said 
the act was no crime, and when the murderer was huDg they had nothing 
but regrets for hiB fate. It is within the memory of all, too, that an 
Irish Roman Catholic clergyman — not merely a Christian gentle/nan, but 
a teacher of Christian gentlemen — enthusiastically shouted from a public 
platform in this city, " that every dollar subscribed to the funds of the 
Land League was a bullet for the heart of an Englishman." It can also be 
recollected that a prominent Irish gentleman, who returned from a visit 
to his native land about two months before the assassination of Caven- 
dish and Burke, designated the carnival of agrarian crime and murder 
which Wits sweeping over the country as "a few manifestations of dis- 
approval of the policy of the Government." No, the day has gone by 
when these persons can run with the hare and stay with the dogs. People 
could respect them infinitely more if they came out boldly and announced 
themselves iu favor of the crimes they do so much toward bringing 
about. — — 

It will be recollected, too, that after the assassination of Cavandish 
and Burke, Parnell and his followers donned black clothes and long 
drawn faces when they entered the House of Commons. They were sorry 
— very. Yet when the Government began taking steps to prevent the 
recurrence of Bucb a crime, they were somewhat more than suspiciously 
vehement in their denunciation of the course. And when Forster showed 
in clear and logical terms that Parnell and his aids were morally guilty of 
the murders they pretended to deplore, Parnell never made reply. He 
had none to make. These facts are suggestive, and when the Chief of 
the New York detective force said, the other day, alluding to the finding 
of the authors of the dynamite outrages, " the London police should 
look higher up," he may have been making a very close hit. 

The news from the Soudan this week is of a most cheering nature. 
After his victory at Abou Klea Wells, General Stewart pushed his 
troops on across the desert until he reached a position on the Nile from 
which Khartoum is easily reached by steamer. This journey involved 
several fights; none of them, however, were as large as that at Abon Klea 
Wells, and the News Letter was right when it predicted that the latter 
affair would probably turn out to be the first and the last big tight the 
Expedition would be engaged in. Practically the matter is all over now. 
The road from Khartoum to San Francisco is as open as that from Peta- 
luma to Healdsburg, and British pluck and valor has given another evi- 
dence of its prowess. — 

The Fran co -Chinese imbroglio still remains in pretty much the same 
position. The latest report is that France has decided to officially de- 
clare war, but this has been rumored so often that little confidence can be 
placed in it. It was also stated, some days back, that the French army 
was now in a condition to walk all over Tonquin, and that the pedestrian 
exhibition was about to begin. The starter is somewhat dilatory. 

The Emperor of Germany is indisposed. This is quite a serious mat- 
ter, because he is a very old man and his general health is very much 
broken down. Those who are nearest to him are very much concerned 
about his general condition, and he is not, therefore, capable of standing 
much indisposition. His death, too, may be productive of startling results. 



HOW THEY WILL RETRENCH. 

Hard times, the result of general depression in trade circles through- 
out the world, has become a topic of general conversation amongst prom- 
inent merchants. The theme has penetrated the substantial walls of the 
Merchants' Exchange. From half past 1 until 2 o'clock the half-hour 
once devoted to earnest business talking is now almost wholly given up to 
discussing schemes of retrenchment. In every group and little knot of 
speakers formed on the main floor, the question asked and answered is, 

How can we cut down expenses?" Johnny Rosenfeld and Allec Duns- 
inuir have agreed that, until coal commands a higher price, they will 
both limit themselves to thirteen two-bit cigars a day. thus saving jointly 
seventeen dollars during the twenty-four hours. C. P. Lolor and J. N. 
Knowles, once the most stylishly dressed merchants in town, have signed 
a solemn compact to order only four new suits of clothes this year, and 
by meeting each other plainly clad to lessen their expenses seven hun- 
dred and twenty dollars during 1885. Capt. Rice and Col. Johnson are 
going to content themselves with Vanity Fair Cigarettes at twenty-five 
cents per hundred, instead of the Egyptian articles especially imported 
for them at two dollars a hundred. This saving will make them both 
independently rich in a short time. T. C. Hopkins and Or. Merritt have 
given up riding in street-cars, and as both are eminently charitable they 
have agreed to dispense ten cents a day to such people as each knows to 
belong to the class called the " deserving poor." Charley Hanson and 
Capt. Simpson, the literary men on 'Change, will buy no more books 
until the price of lumber has advanced. Both have agreed to stop their 
subscriptions to the Atlantic and the Century, at the risk of bringing ruin 
upon the heads of the publishers of those magazines. George Fritch and 
Andrew Welch will accept no more invitations to yachting parties. 
Sending presents of baskets of champagne to thp yacht owners makes 
the fun too costly. Judah Baker and Pv. D. Chandler have cut off Sun- 
day rides through the Park in double teams. That means for them a 
margin of fifty dollars a month for other expenses, which, although less 
showy, are more necessary. William Dresbach and Henry Doyle will 
limit themselves to one night at the opera during each week, and their 
invitations not to exceed two. It is very sad that two such ardent lovers 
of music should be compelled to deprive themselves of the sweetest thing 
in life; but alas! the price of wheat is low, and sixty dollars a week to 
hear Emma Abbott counts up. 

This accurate resume of the plans devised by our rich business men to 
retain their wealth may have a depressing effect upon sympathetic read- 
ers, which we regret; but if it restores confidence to our bankers and the 
leading financiers of the world, as it certainly must, then we have earned 
the warmest thanks of the whole commercial community. 



LABORING IN USELESS AGONY. 
Tbe editorial intellect, as unfolded in the daily press, has been sadly 
exercised and excited over the alleged animosity of President Barrios, of 
Guatemala, to the project of President Arthur's administration, looking 
to the construction of an Interoceanic highway across Nicaragua. The 
warriors of the sanctum have a remarkable facility — on paper — in dis- 
patching national and public enemies. Already they have made away 
with Barrios, and now he hangs suspended before the world, bloody and 
gasping for breath, in the claws of the American eagle. The President 
of 'Guatemala is not a man to be unceremoniously slain by pens and ink- 
bottles in the hands of even the most skilled warriors, and his opposition 
to the project noted, if real, might end in complications that would test 
our strength and national resources. Barrios, though the ablest and most 
successful politician and ruler in Central America, would, as represent- 
ing the little Republic of which he is President, be an insignificant figure 
when contrasted with our own republic and its chief executive. But he 
would seek powerful allies and in these hope to accomplish his purposes. 
He has on more than one occasion suggested a confederation of the Cen- 
tral American States, with the avowed purpose of having himself elected 
President. The jealousies and hostilities of the neighboring republics 
prevented this. It may be that President Barrios is again ambitious to 
create a confederation, and he may think that now is the proper time, as 
if it were accomplished his opposition as President of the various re- 
publics would be much more formidable to the project than it is now. 
The Americans who have had relations with the Dictator of Guatemala 
— his real title — testify to the fact that he does not manifest hostility to- 
wards Americans or enterprises in which they are engaged, but, on the 
contrary, has encouraged them. Nor do we see any grave reasons why 
he should oppose the construction of the Interoceanic route across Nica- 
ragua, since he must be convinced that his opposition would be futile if it 
were once undertaken by the American government. There are only two 
means by which that opposition would amount to anything, and, as 
stated, one is through a confederation of the States and the other by al- 
lying himself with foreign governments. He is not at all likely to ac- 
complish either, and hence we look at all this agony about his opposition 
to the Nicaragua project as childish and puerile. 

THE TUG RELIEF. 

Messrs. J. D. Spreokels & Bros, have every reason to be satisfied 
with their new craft. She is powerful and handsome, and has plenty of 
speed. Her dimensions are now well known, and her trial trip last Sat- 
urday proved her speed, and the ease and smoothness with which her 
powerful engines work. Just before two o'clock she left the Oceanic 
Steamship Co.'s wharf with about thirty gentlemen on board, many of 
whom are intimately associated with our mercantile marine, and promi- 
nent amongst others we noticed a strong representation of the British 
shipmasters in port. As the tug steamed down the water front she was 
saluted by all the steam vessels along her course, and her steam whistle 
was kept busy responding. A run was made about five miles outside the 
heads, and on the return trip a visit was paid to the house and grounds 
of the Pacific Yacht Club, Saucelito, and from that point home. Good 
judges of speed at sea estimated that the Belief traveled at a rate vary- 
ing from fourteen to sixteen knots. The former is probably the more cor- 
rect estimate. The day was lovely, and the bar and ocean as smooth as 
glass. Messrs. John D., A. B. and C. A. Spreckels accompanied their 
guests, and each was most unremitting in his efforts to make the trip in 
every way delightful to the guests, and as usual, when they take any- 
thing in hand, they succeeded admirably. 




.,--„ 



SUN *5*NGi$$ a 



SJftETTER 




Vol. 35. 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, FEB. 7, 1885. 



No. 31. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



i rmad 10 

14 Ca*« 10 

Additional BUI of Particulars 10 

Hi isuro 10 

An in Auctions.... 16 

a Wnnl or two in Explanation lo 

An Ak.'""\ o( Affinity (poetry) ft 

A Bonnet.... . s 

Between Ourselves (poetrv) IS 

•' Biz" 11> 

Cftnt D^groaohy** Side 15 

Chean Insurance Rales. 4 

Comments on Foreign Affairs. 20 

Cradle. Altar and Tumb 18 

Pmehi it's Voice. 2 

Kin;iiKi.ii Bevfew 1 

Oamo Birds of Californu-No 4 

Qsognpnloml St*-ielv .i( the Pacitic....lS 

QOSslp (r.'in Sew Vnrk S 

IitttUrunce 1 



ttflf 14 

Noi itriUa. .. 1" 

Our Mining: Interests. 20 

Besnuks IS 

Perhaps She Had Pretty Feet (poetry) 12 

Pleasure's Wand 

i Lead iwr Stocks, etc 1 

K. .mI E-Uitf Transactions 10 

Bamson Among the Ruins -0 

! Short Stories 2 

Bocietjj 3 

Sporting 7 

Superstition in Shetland S 

Sunbeams 6 

The Devil in San Francisco (poetry)... 3 

The Last Chapter but One 17 

1 Those Banking Bills 15 

I Town Crier 11 

Welcome - 1 

Why the " R^yal" is the Best 9 



FINANCIAL REVIEW. 

No change in the mining market worthy of note ; prices unaltered 
since last writing. The 2,800-foot level of Norcross is looking extremely 
promising, and report says it is the best showing we have had on the 
Comstock for some time. In the crosscut No. 2 on this level, some good- 
Looking quarts is being discovered, rich in metal. 

Gould & Curry will soon commence active operations on the 1,000-foot 
level, which has heretofore been unexplored. There is no danger of a 
flood out here, as it is above the Sutro Tunnel. 

t tphir and Mexican are working down from the 300-foot levels, drifting 
in different directions to explore old ground left in early days. 

All the North End mines are abandoned below the level of the Sutrn 
Tunnel. Sierra Nevada, having abandoned the lower levels, is going to 
work on Cedar Hill, in the old Sacramento ground, where good ore was 
found years ago. 

Belcher, Crown Point and Yellow Jacket are shipping a large amount 
of good ore to the mills, while they are exploring at many points, with a 
view of uncovering other ore bodies which are known to exist. 

Pacific Rolling Mills Co. held a meeting on Wednesday, when it was 
decided to issue $500,000 bonds, to bear 6 per cent, and run 10 years. 

San Francisco Gaslight Co. stock fell, this week, from §60^ to $59£, but 
reacted to $60. The cause of the decline was the announcement that the 
Supervisors were going to consider the advisability of reducing the rates 
to the old rate, $1J per M. 

Cal. R. R. stock offered at 81^, Sutter St. R. R. offered at S100, Geary 
St. R, R. sales at 96£, during the week. Omnibus stock sold lately as 
low as Sol. 

At the meeting of the Directors of the Citizens' Building and Loan 
Association, held on the 30th ultimo, the following officers were elected : 
Geo. T. Marye, President; Edward B. Rambo, Vice-President; Charles 
K. Clerk, Secretary; and J. R. K. Nuttall, Treasurer. The stock of the 
first series, to be issued on the 3d March, is being rapidly subscribed for, 
and the books will close as soon as 1,500 shares have been taken. 

The discovery of the silver mines at Windy Camp, in Shasta county, 
occurred Dearly three years ago, by Wm. Murry, who, with an Indian, 
was in search of buried treasure, which they had hopes of finding to re- 
plenish their depleted pockets, and, while thus engaged, found what are 
now known as the Windy Camp mines. Other prospectors have been 
equally fortunate thereabouts, inasmuch as Messrs. Volney, Lowe, Cook 
and Nichols have claims on the great belt, which show up immense bodies 
of ore, carrying sulphides and sulphates of silver and gold, with assays 
from a few dollars into hundreds of dollars per ton. Their work con- 
sists of short tunnels and shafts, which exposes ore wherever opened. A 
gold belt has also been found but a short distance from the last-named 
mines which cropB out ten feet high, and from two and one-half to ten 
feet thick, carrying very high grade ore ; in fact, gold can be seen in the 
vein in several places. This ore is in white porphyry and fluor-spar, and 
is the most remarkable find made in this section. 

A boom is expected in this camp, and already men of capital are putting 
in an appearance, with an eye to business. 

Locators of a mine in Deadwood District, Trinity county, refused this 
week an offer of $55,000 for their property, which has only been opened 
up five feet. 

Agricultural, Grazing and Fruit Lands.— First- class lands, in large 
or small tracts, suitable for all purposes. Situated near railroad, with 
plenty of fuel and water. Can be had at $1 per acre ; 40 cents cash, bal- 
ance 1, 2 and 3 years' time, at 6 per cent, per annum. Thorough in- 
formation at this office. 

Latest from the Merchant's Exchange. — New York, Feb. 6, 1885. 
TJ. S. Bonds— 3s, 101, b; 4s, 121g, b, ex-int. ; 4s, 112^, b. Sterling Ex- 
change, 484@487^. Western Union, 61J. 

Mr. George Augustus Sala will be entertained at dinner by the mem- 

bers of the Bohemian Club on Tuesday evening next. _ 

London, February 5— Consols, 99 7-8(aiQQ l-16d- 



PRICES OF LEADINQ STOCKS AND Q0V. BONDS. 









Nnn Francisco, Feh. 


«, 18SB. 


Stocks and Honda, 


Bid. 


Ask-ui 


Stock* and Romle. 


Bid. 


Alkri 


BONDS. 






IFndaon Bfanof'gOo 


!7 


221 


Cal. State Bonds, 6's,'67 


— 


— 


Bum,. 






S. F. City &Co. B'ds, 08,'op 


— 


— 


Bank of California (ex dlv), 




157 


S. F. City & Co. B'ds,7s ... 


— 


— 


Pacific Bank 


— 


— 


Montg'y A v. Bonds 


— 


— 


First National (ox div) ... 


115 


118 




— 


— 


UAILHOAD8. 








z 


z 




28 

107 


30 




C. P. E. R. Bonds (ei con.) 


110 




— 


— 


Citv Railroad 


60 


90 




— 


_ 




65 
03 


58 






941 
102 J 


Los Angeles County Bonds. 


— 


— 


Sutter Street R. R 


— 


Los Angeles City Bonds. . . . 
Virg'a & Truckee R. R. Bda. 


— 


.. 


Geary Street R. R 


96 


'.'7 


— 


- 




15 

Nom. 


25 


Nevada Co. N.U. R. R. Bds 




Nom. 


Oakland City Bonds 


— 


— 


Clay Street Hill R. R 


— 


— 


Or.R&N.Co. Bonds, 6s 


108 
953 
12H 


109 




59} 


60 






80 








50 


57J 




994 


101 


Califor'a Powder Co 


125 


150 




- 


- 




55 
53 
57J 


00 




Atlantic Giant Powder 

Gold and Stock Teleir'h Co. 


50 




61 




119 


124 


S.V.W.W.Co'e Stock 

S.V.W.W.Co's Bonds 


S8j 
U6| 






u«i 


MISCELLANKOl'S. 






Pacific Coast S.S.Co's Stock 








90 


110 


California Street R. R 


81 


82J 




374 


42j 
48 




40 


49 










30 
11 

4 


35 


INSURANCE C0MPAN1R8. 


125 




Hawaiian Commercial Co.. 




Fireman's Fund (ex div) . . 


180 


California Iron and Steel Co. 


3 


5 




104 


1064 



The annual meetings of the various corporations are attracting the 
usual interest. The sales, however, during the week, do not indicate any 
special desire to purchase stocks. A. Baird, 411 Montgomery street. 



G 



OLD BARS— 920 fine par.— Refined Silver-16^18 U? cent, dis- 
count. Mexican DollarB, 84£@85c. nominal. 

'Exchange on New York, 20c. @ 15c; on London Bankers, 49gd.@ 
49Ad. ; Paris, sight, 5-12jV@5-10 francs per dollar. Telegrams on New 
York, 25c.@30c. 



&~ Price of Money here, 6@10 per cent, per year — bank rate. In the 
open market, 2@li P er month. Demand fair. On Bond Security, 
5@6 per cent, p er year, on Call. Demand good . 

O" Latest price of Sterling in New York, 484£@48r£. 

WELCOME. 

To-day Mr. George Augustus Sala, the famous English journalist, 
lecturer and author, will arrive in this city on his way to Australia. Mr. 
Sala is no stranger here, having paid us a visit in 1880. Outside of that, 
he is a stranger nowhere that the English language is spoken and 
English literature understood. At the present day be is probably the 
most distinguished man of letters alive. We can think of no one who 
outranks him in general literature. His command of language is un- 
limited, his diction graceful yet forcible, his research profound, his 
memory wonderful, and he has traveled pretty much all over the entire 
habitable globe. Possessing as he does all these advantages, it is but 
natural that his capacity for original thought, as well as for learned in- 
vestigation and discussion, should be almost unlimited. Mr. Sala is as 
much at home on the public platform a3 at the desk, and as an after-din- 
ner speaker he is said to have few, if any, equals in Europe. When met 
with in the ordinary course of social courtesies, Mr. Sala is found to be a 
conversationalist possessing rare charms and endowed with wonderful 
magnetism. Mr. Sala will leave for Australia on the 14th, and during 
his seven days' stay he will lecture at Platt'B Hall on Wednesday even- 
ing, and again on Friday evening. Those of our people who have never 
met this distinguished ornament to the nineteenth century should be 
careful not to miss this opportunity. On the lecture platform Mr. Sala i* 
not a ranter. He is simply a bright, fluent speaker, who carries his hear- 
ers with him, giving them a glimpse of things as they are seen through 
the spectacles of a great mind. The News Letter extends to Mr. Sala 
a cordial welcome. 

The following Callfornians were registered at the office of the Conti- 
nental Gazette, Paris, on Thursday, Jan. 8th: Miss May Courcy, Mr. and 
Mrs. Courcy, Mr. Coleman, all of San Francisco, Hotel Bristol. The 
following are registered at the office of the American Register, Paris: H. 
Lent, San Francisco, Hotel Bellevue; Mrs. Tallant and family, San Fran- 
cisco, Hotel Windsor; E. Weretreman, San Francisco, 18 Rue Matignon; 
Mr. Zimmer, San Francisco, Hotel Chatham. And at the office of the 
same paper, in London, G. W. Tindal, San Francisco, Charing Cross 
Hotel, is recorded. Miss Mary Grant and Miss Annie F. Grant, San 
Francisco, are registered at the office cf Lombard, Odier & Co., bankers, 
Geneva. 

Registered at the Postoffice at San Francisco, California, as Second-Class Matter. 



Printed and Published fcy the Proprietor, Frederick Marriott, 607 to 615 Merchant street, San Francisco. California. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Feb. 7.. 1885. 



FASHION'S VOICE. 



" I think I will buy a jersey," I remarked to Ethel, a day or two 
ago. " Do, Daisy," she replied, "your arm is fine and the jersey will 
show it off." My eldest born, who is slightly impertinent now and then, 
laughed in a high key, and immediately put in a word. " Are you crazy, 
mother?" he said, " because if not, please don't attempt one of those 
stretchers," I tried to look dignified, but, being a thorough Bohemian, 
it wouldn't tit, bo I gave way to merriment instead. " What is the ob- 
jection to my wearing a jersey, you impudent monkey ? " Well, I don't 
want you to get off any skittish rackets like the old dames on Kearny 
street, if you ask me." "Do you call me an old dame, sir," (indignantly). 
" Not by any manner of means ; but if you saw what I see every day 
you would not blame me for not wishing my mother to make a simpleton 
of herself." 

" I was walking along Kearny when I looked up and saw before me a 
woman in a jersey. The thing was very thin, and showed plainly a, pair 
of pink corsets underneath. I swear they were laced about six inches 
apart, which plainly showed the white stuff between tbe lacing." 
" Can't you give the * white stuff' a name, sir ? " I queried. 
" Well, I guess it was a chemise ; but Lord, every fellow on the street 
was looking at that old dame, and taking no end of amusement out of 
the display through the thin jersey." 

My son was correct. There absolutely is nothing more ridiculous than 
a feminine robed in a handsome skirt, and above that a 51 50 Jersey 
waist, so transparent that the pink, blue or white of the corset is seen 
through. 

Let me tell you how this may be obviated. Make an under-waist of 
thin black silk, fitting perfectly, and over that wear your Jersey. The 
effect is good. Of course, if you have a lovely round arm, you will not 
mind it showing through, and, by the way, the silk under-waist need not 
be made more than half-high — that is, just on a line with the top of the 
corsets. 

Nothing truly is more hideous than a panorama of corsets, half-laced, 
showing beneath a thin Jersey. Some people wear two Jerseys— one 
very light, the other heavy — but that depends on individual taste. Some 
women are possessed of modesty, and keep their corsets for private view 
only; others care little who sees them chacune a son gout! Jumping from 
the body to the head, let us consider the gear of that member. As a rule, 
bonnets are the present rage. 

Hats and bonnets are the antipodes of each other. The present hat is 
high-ascending, with a narrow crown, heavenward. Tbe zephyr-like 
plumes, which are abstracted from the tail of the bird of paradise, on the 
top of said crown, also aspire to wave in celestial space. So high do they 
soar, I may say, that from the brow of the wearer to the extreme tip of 
the aforesaid plumes, in some cases, two feet of air are monopolized. 
This Btyle on a tall woman has much the effect of turning her into a 
bold grenadier — I mean to outward view, of course. Then comes her 
companion with a bonnet, or rather skull-cap, on her head — & few rounds 
of straw, a big bunch of dark velvet bunched in front, and a few brass 
pins run through, which pins are elaborated by small pieces of glass to 
imitate the true diamond. 

I remember, when children, we used to look out for cast-off bonnets, 
which in those days had large poke brims ; to cut out the crown and wear 
it with a few field flowers stuck around it was the very summit of our am- 
bition, for the novelty of the thing seemed to us perfectly delightful. 
Well, these present straw caps, in their simple inelegance, are precisely a 
repetition of the coveted old crowns. Then there ought to be a pair of 
wide strings, tied beneath the chin, to be quite a la mode, and I assure 
you that you are turned into a middle-aged dame at once. However, 
women of taste will trim these things high with tips or coques of ribbon, 
to take off the excessive flatness ; but if you take my advice, you who are 
young and good-looking will adhere to your hats, ladies, and leave the 
bonnets to your grandmammas. 

A new hat is made of the material of the dress. The crown is high, 
narrowing at top, and the front is made of a deep frill of the stuff, quite 
plain behind and rather closing over the back of the head ; while in front 
are two large box pleats, which rather flap over the bang, but to relieve 
which flatness a bow of ribbon is tucked beneath one of the pleats, over 
the dexter eye, so lifting it into position. It looks cute, but takes a 
mighty pretty face to bear the strain of anything so peculiar. A long 
plume, fastened behind, is brought down to rest its tip upon that uplifted 
pleat ; while, also, from the back starts up the regulation tails of the 
paradise bird, and there is also an enormoufe rosette of ribbon right on the 
front of the crown, with a nice brass and glass ornament, which looks 
like a Highlander's cairn gorm, but which is very far removed from that 
handsome appendage. 

Again, there is the hat which comes up with a swoop in front, making 
a point almost as sharp as the Devil's Peak, and on the top of this point 
sits a wonderful rosette of narrow ribbon. In fact, all these hats are cal- 
culated to take the beholder into wonderland. So many of them seem to 
wrap up the head behind — hug it, as it were — while the pleated fronts, 
brought up into a peak with its many plumes at top, strongly remind one 
of a miniature and barren hill-crown by a clump of trees. Simplicity in 
head-gear is, in my eyes, very becoming. Much more so that this ever- 
lasting straining after effects incongruous and frightful, though "in the 
fashion." All superfluity of trimming round the face spoils the face. If 
pretty, it takes from the charm ; if homely, it adds to the homeliness. 
A plain hat, with medium crown coming straight over the brow, with 
just a suspicion of a turned roll at one side, and a handsome bunch of 
tips, or two long feathers thrown across the front, and left to nestle in 
the turn-up, or slightly fall over it, is far preferable to all the fuss and 
rubbish that goes to form a mountain on a mole-hilL Beg pardon. Of 
course, I don't say your heads are mole-hills, ladies, though some are 
hardly as well recognized as even that lowly spot. 

A head-dress of lace and loops is the present style for elderly ladies 
(when you can find them). At present the race seems extinct, but really, 
I do think that a little round flat cap of real lace, with just a bow and 
ends at one side, is quite a charming adornment for morning wear, even 
for young women. In fact, a little "thing of this kind gives piquancy to 
the wearer, instead of age. But let us be young as long as we can — an 
end that is not accomplished by weight of ornament. Silver Pen. 



SHORT STORIES. 

[From the pen of tbe News Letter Novelist.] 



Flournoy's Flurry. 

" Shades of the Southern chivalry defend us ! " 

Colonel George Flournoy struck his fist upon the table with terrible 
force as he uttered these words. 

"How now, thou unterrified Democrat? What hath angered thee 
now? " inquired Judge David S. Terry. 

" Much, David, much," replied the Colonel. " Behold the Democratic 
party is once more in power." 

" 'Tis true, and Heaven be praised," ejaculated Terry. " By my hand- 
some countenance, it cannot be this that rileth thee ! " 

"And lo ! the same party hath good prospect of remaning in con- 
trol," continued Flournoy, not noticing the interruption. 

" Verily, that is a fact, for which let us a second time praise the Giver 
of All Good," said Terry, with religious fervor. 

" And it is likely that the Southern States will remain solid, and that 
California will wheel into line four years hence," continued the agitated 
Colonel. 

*' Indeed, yes. But, Flournoy, my fine fellow, I cannot see what there 
is in all this to invoke thy wrath. It seemeth to me thou shouldst re- 
joice with all thy might." 

"That do I, David. I do hug myself with joy when I think of the 
prospects of our glorious party. It is not these thoughts which raise my 
dandruff." 

" What, then, is it, good Flournoy. I Ho beseech thee to make thee my 
confidante. What Lath transpired to ruffle thy urbanity ? " 

" Knowest thou a man named Samuel M. Wilson?" 

"Verily, that do I ; and a likely youth he is, too." 

" Now, by the rusty musket I carried in the late unpleasantness, thou 
makest me tired, David. A likely youth ! Wilson a likely youth ! And 
what is there likely about him, O, thou ex-duelist ? " 

" Why, he is likely to remain in California." 

Ah, ha ! Give me thy hand, intelligent man. Thou dost evince more 
perception than I imagined was in thee. This it is, sweet David, that 
raiseth my anger. While the old boys of Mississippi, Alabama and 
Georgia have been whooping things up ; while our ancient and beloved 
chieftain, Jeff Davis, has been re-asserting his old doctrines and putting 
out Sherman's eye ; while every day brings to our ears the blessed news 
of a revival of the old issues, several thoughtless coadjutors of California 
have been urging Wilson for a position in the Cabinet of our glorious 
Cleveland— a position, sir, to which I aspire myself ; a position for which 
my Southern record amply recommends me. One would imagine that 
this Wilson had done valuable service for his party. From the manner 
in which several of our colleagues are pressing his suit, one might suspect 
him of having fought with Price ! " 

"Which, in truth, he did not," interrupted Terry; "I know, of my 
own knowledge, that Wilson was an Abolitionist 1 " 

" Ay, begawd, sir." said the Colonel, warming with fierce excitement ; 
" by the sword of General Lee, he was not one of us in the dark days of 
the struggle. And now, that the battle is won ; that the South, after 
years of patient trial ; after epochs of ill-merited abuse from the sus- 
picious North, has once more asserted her rightful sway ; has taken hold 
of the reins of government ; now, I say, this half-Democrat, this loyal 
minion of the Pacific Coast, is advocated for a Cabinet position in rivalry 
with me, sir, who fit with Jackson, begawd, sir ! I Bay it is outrageous, 
sir. Yes, sir ! " And the Colonel walked the floor in his excitement. 

" Easy, eaBy, Flournoy. Judge not Wilson's chances too greatly. Be 
not unduly exercised. In truth, I think be hath not a ghost of & show," 
said Terry, in a conciliatory tone ; "but thou knowest that it is seemly 
that California should present the name of more than one candidate. We 
should aim to convey the impression, Colonel, that the Pacific coast 
abounds in great men. 'Twill be all the more honor for thee, because, 
when tbou art chosen, thou canst truly Bay, * I am the greatest of all.' " 

" Truly, David, that maybe so. Thy explanation hath eased me much. 
Come, let us to the sign of the Big Indian round the corner, and there 
together partake of a Carolina stogy." 

And the two patriots tiled down stairs arm-in-arm. 

E. Amsden, late of San Francisco, now of Yokohama, Japan, exports 
(skillfully packed) all classes of gnods, from the rarest Curios and Works 
of Art to the more moderate grades, and invites correspondence. No. 18 
Yokohama, under Windsor Hotel. 

See advertisement on cover to know where to get the genuine 
Krug Champagne from Reims, France. Beware of California and other 
counterfeits. 

Williams & Norton, new Photograph Gallery, 914 Market street, be- 
tween Powell and Stockton, use the San Francisco Dry Plate exclusively. 



BURR BEDS! 



The Only Successful and Satisfactory FOLDING BED ever made 
No Trouble. Opens and Closes with Bedding and Pillows all 
in place. THIRTY STYLES-from $30 TTp. 

MANTEL FOLDING BEDS tiom $15 Up 



H. H. GROSS, 

xe and IS Second. Street, S. F. 



. . 1880. 



CUM TORN 1 A ADVERTISKK. 



SOCIETY. 



Februarys, 18S5. Aside bom the damp* foggy mornings this week 

there bu been little to eompl iin ol <'!i tin- MXttV U weather of Ule. -Lint 

ik, tin- driven, and the lidewtlkaoi the shopping portion of the 
.us, bavo oaoh and all ■• lArgfl number of patrons of u afternoon. The 
time i-* now rapidly approaching when they will be the chief meeting* 
grounde of Society who coma under the heading of Uburcfa members, 
though I Aiu given to understand that tl insider the theaters as 

beyond the pole daring the penitential period ol Lent will fall on the 
rinks, on the plea that at them healthful exercise can be obtaiued, 
and therefore they can not be elassed as .nhices of amusement. 

Hut twelve days now remain before Lent, and where, O where, are 
the balls which wen* promised as to take place before Ash Wednesday 
arrived, to inaugurate a season of quiet and repose after the maddening 
gaiety of the winter still, in the future, where, no doubt, they will re- 
main. Among other looked-for iffairs was something at the hands of 
htm, HopUni and the Crooker />nl/ >i' adieu, and the questiou asked is, 
may the failure of the latter to lie given be accepted as a sign that we 
ure aoj to loose them after all? If so, I think there are but few who 
would cheerfully and gladly forego that brief pleasure to retain them in 
indefinitely. 

The largest party of this week will be the dance this evening, to be 
(given by Miss Florence Atherton, at which an unusually large number of 
young ladies will be present; all the debutantes of the present season, 
Lnolnaing Slim May Erriedtander, who made her first appearance in Soci- 
ety at the Griffith party last week. On Saturday party calls are to be 
made at Angel Island, which means, should the weather hold good, an- 
other delightful afternoon will be spent there. Tbe extra Philharmonic 
will also be given at Piatt's Hall, and the attendance already promises to 
be a large one, provided it don't rain, of which, at this writing, there are 
Itfong probabilities. Hut, take it altogether, the present week has been 
a decidedly off one in the social world. Next week, however, will no 
doubt make amends, every evening being enjoyed two and three deep ai- 
re .idy, 80 to speak. Among the principle events named are the Uthuno 
Glob gathering at Mrs. Volney Spauldiug's on Monday night, the Pope 
reception and tbe Loring Club concert on Tuesday evening, the Hough- 
ton-Bulketey and the Stern Scholle weddings on Wednesday, the Macbeth 
musical production on Thursday, the final german of the Crickets on 
Friday, etc., etc. 

Among the most recently-announced engagements is that of Miss 
Katie Jarboe to Mr. Small, and the wedding will probably take place 
some time during the early Summer. The bride elect is quite well known 
in social circles, and took a very prominent part last season in the 
organization known as the Cricket Club, being, I believe, its principal 
founder. Of course, tbe wedding of the month, indeed of the season, will 
be Miss Fanny Houghton's to Mr. Bulkeley, which is named for Wednes- 
day evening of next week, when no doubt old Trinity will be filled to its 
utmost limits to witness the ceremony, the reception taking place after- 
wards at the Palace Hotel. 

In Jewish circles, the wedding of Mr. Joseph Ehrman and Miss Clara 
Heller, which was solemnized on Tuesday evening at the Heller residence 
on < totavn street, has been a much talked of event for some time past, 
and created quite a stir, but no doubt the wedding of the season in that 
circle, and for which extensive preparations are being made, will be Miss 
Lilly Sterns with Mr. Albert Scholle, which is to take place next 
Wednesday evening at the bride's residence on Leavenworth street. The 
floral decorations are to be something quite out of the common order, 
aud many new features in their arrangement will be introduced " for 
this occasion only." The prospective bride is a petite derui- blonde, and 
is a great favorite among her friends, and the wedding robe is spoken 
of as "a marvel of extreme beauty and elegance." 

Oakland, too, is quite up to the times as regards weddings, no less than 
two among her best known residents taking place there within the space 
of twenty-four hours. I mean the wedding of Miss Mollie Noble to Mr. 
J. W. Greyson, Jr., which ceremony was performed yesterday, at the 
residence of the bride, on Seventeenth ttreet; and that of Mr. W. Huff 
Cook to Miss Mollie Edmunds, which took place at St. Paul's Church 
last evening. Mr. and Mrs. Cook will hold a reception, at their residence 
in this city, some time next week. 

Theatre parties still continue to be given, and both at the Baldwin and 
at the Minstrels several gay little parties have been seen during the 
week. To those who enjoy going to the theatre for the sake of what 
they see and hear upon the stage, I do not think these crowds are pro- 
ductive of much pleasure, the dainty little supper which fallows being, 
in their eyes, the chief attraction. Leave them out and I fear the " the- 
atre" party would soon come to grief, and I think the sooner the better. 
They are, nine times out of ten, a trial to the temper and the patience of 
the rest of the audience, who pay their money for some other purpose 
than to listen to the hysterical giggling and nonsensical babble which 
generally is the chief feature of these " parties." 

I understand that we may soon look for the return of Mrs. George 
Hearst, who has given up her European trip for the present, and the lady 
entertains so charmingly our Society can congratulate itself that she will 
soon be with it again. However, we are, X am sorry to say, about to 
loose a most delightful hostess in the person of Mrs. Walter Dean, who, 
with her husband and son, will leave us at an early day, going first 
to New Orleans to see the wonders there on view before proceeding East. 
The Crocker party will leave for that destination some time next week, 
in time to reach New Orleans for the Mardi Gras celebration. We in 
'Frisco are again going to attempt something of the kind this year, and 
as the managers are very wisely going to dispense with the street parade, 
which have heretofore been such utter failures, aud confine their efforts 
to the display at the Pavilion, there are not only hopes, but great proba- 
bilities, that it be as successful an effort, as there is no reason why it 
should not be, in such a cosmopolitan place as our dearly loved city of the 
sand-hills. Felix. 

We regret to learn from England that Lady Wolseley (ne'e Miss 
Murphy of San Francisco) has had the misfortune to lose her infant, 
which only survived its birth a few hours. The young mother herself 
has been dangerously ill. 



THE DEVIL IN SAN FRANCISCO. 
"Tie long tlmo tinoe the Devil oame to sue 
How fared his San Branolsoa family, 

And gloat with eager eyes upon the lot 
<>t aloe ripe souls, all ready for his pot, 
But a short while ago his oighnesi came; 
No paper, though, annonnoH his dreaded name. 
hTe thought 'twas butter thus to oome "incog," 

Than Bet the folks with wonderment agog. 
So, garbed in suit of epostollfl black, 
Aud tail coiled neatly up his shapely back. 
The Devil trends the San Francisco streets, 
Noting full welt each face and form he meets. 

One of the first queer fish he ran across 
Was young MeDowel), Jimj/eside'i bright boss. 
Long time the Devil scanned the young man o'er, 
Then turned away. With red-hot oath he swore 
When he got home he would at once dispatch 
One of his trusted imps and bid him catch 
This " rara avis," both of form and face, 
Which he considered worthy of a place 
In Hell's museum. He had nothing there 
Which, for grotesqueness, could one whit compare, 
Or even hold a candle by the side 
Of this great genius of the Jingkside, 

This young man, blown out like a frog with pride 

Of intellect, and longing for a ride 

On Pegasus; but if he had that luck, 

Be sure the insulted steed would quickly buck 

His clumsy rider off, and maybe kick 

Out all his brains at one ferocious lick. 

(His brains, no doubt, 'twould be no joke to find; 

Some say he's none— but folks will be unkiud). 

Dreaming of genius which he never had, 

Half ape, half fool, half scribbler and half mad. 

Eager for slaughter, and resolved to tear 

From others' brows that wreath he must not wear. 

Then the Devil looked at a bulletin board. 
As he read out the news, why, he fairly roared. 
It said: "O'Donovan Rossas shot." 
' Thank God," said the Devil, " I'd make it hot 
For Jerry, whenever he comes below, 
In order my great respect to show 
For one who has egged on scores into crime, 
And hung aloof himself all the time. 
But snakes like Russa are hard to kill, 
And I fear the shot will but make him ill. 
For much as I long to have him below, 
This time, I fear, it will be " no go." 

When the Devil heard how white women sold 
Their female children for Chinese gold, 
He could not make out in his mind just quite 
Who was most to blame, the Chinese or white. 
He thought of the children he'd often seen, 
Whose drunken parents ne'er kept them clean, 
But let them run out on the streets to play, 
And hunt for their food through the livelong 
Then at night to sleep as best they could, 
On a mattress bare or a floor of wood, 
And taught from the cradle to lisp a curse 
And wondered if Chinamen did much worse. 



lay, 



On next Thursday afternoon, at 3 o'clock, the entire music to Mac- 
beth will be sung at Piatt's Music Hall, by Mr. Edgar S. Kelly, assisted 
by Messrs. J. H. Itosewald and Louis Schmidt, Sr. The bill will also 
include melodramatic readings by Mr. George Weasels, and the orchestra 
will contain fifty first-class performers. Taken altogether, it will assuredly 
be an entertainment well worth attending. 

An extra Philharmonic Concert will take place at Piatt's Hall this 
afternoon, at 2 o'clock. A splendid programme has been prepared for 
the occasion, and those who attend are sure to enjoy a musical treat 
which will more than repay them their. expenditure of time and money. 

The dress-coat is generally worn by the groom at the city weddings, 
but for an elopement there is nothing like the cutaway. 













w 



>r 



SAN FRANCISGO NEWS LETTER AND 



Feb. 7, 1885. 



CHEAP INSURANCE RATES. 

The result of cutting insurance rates, and the endeavors of insurance 
companies to get business by taking risks at "low" and "seductive" 
figures, has frequently ended disastrously to both the insurers and in* 
sured. The following list of Joint-Stock Fire and Marine Insurance 
Companies that have failed, retired or reinsured during the past ten years 
tells its own tale. This list was compiled by the Chicago Investigator, and 
includes a few of the most prominent Mutuals which did an agency busi- 
ness in several states ; but it does not include the several hundred dis- 
trict, county and township Mutuals which have also failed during the 
past ten years. In fact, it may be said to be only a partial list of the 
financial wreck which have resulted from too cheap insurance: 
1875. 

Atlas, New Orleans ; failed. 

Atlas, New York. 

Atlas Marine, New York. 

Davenport, Davenport, la.; reinsured in German of Freeport, Illinois. 

Eureka, Pittsburg, Pa.; failed. 

Farm Buildings, Herkimer, N. Y.; failed. 

Great Western, New Orleans ; failed. 

Householders, Pittsburg, Pa.; failed. 

Mercantile, Chicago ; reinsured in the Home of Galveston. 

Merchants, New Orleans; failed. 

Merchants and Mechanics, Orwigsburg, Pa.; failed. 

Newton, Providence ; reinsured in the Providence Washington. 

North Penn. N. Wales ; failed. 

Peoples, Little Rock, Ark.; reinsured in the Continental. 

Salamander, New Orleans ; reinsured in the Teutonia, of New Orleans. 

State, Rutland, Vt.; reinsured in the iEtna. 

Tradesmen's, New Orleans ; failed. 

Western Texas, San Antonio ; retired. 

Western Mass., Pittsfield ; retired. 

Workingmfcn's, New Orleans ; failed. 

Wyoming, Wilkesbarre, Pa.; reinsured in the Commercial Union. 

1876. 

American Underwriters', Phila.; failed. 
Atlantic, Atlantic, la. ; retired. 
Clayton, Wilmington, Del.; failed. 

Commercial, New Orleans ; reinsured in the Sun of New Orleans. 
Defiance, Defiance, O.; retired. 

Farmers, Merchants and Manufacturers, Hamilton, O.; reinsured in 
the Fireman's of Dayton. 
Globe, Chicago; failed. 
Kansas, Leavenworth ; failed. 
Keystone, Reading, Pa.; failed. 

Oswego County Farmers', N. Y.; reinsured in the Watertown. 
Penn, Philadelphia; failed. 
People's, Phila.; failed. 
Safeguard, Pbila.; failed. 

State, Lansing, Mich.; reinsured in the Home of N. Y. 
Sun, Cleveland, O.; reinsured in the Continental. 
Sunbury, Sunbury, Pa.; failed. 
Tennessee, Nashville; reinsured in the Connecticut. 
Washington, Memphis ; reinsured in the Merchants of Memphis. 

1877. 
Albemarle, Va.; reinsured in the Granite of Richmond. 
Arctic, New York; reinsured in the Imperial of London. 
Boatman's, St. Louis; reinsured in American Central. 
Bangor, Me.; failed. 
Brewers', Milwaukee; failed. 

Brewers' and Maltsters', New York; reinsured in Merchants of Newark. 
Citizens', Wheeling, W. Va.; failed. 
Commercial, St. Louis; failed. 
Galveston, Texas; reinsured in Union of Galveston. 
Globe, Boston; reinsured in Shawmut. 
Holland Purchase, Batavia, N. Y.; retired. 
Home, Galveston; reinsured. 
Merchants', Louisville; reinsured in Royal. 

Old Dominion, Richmond, Va.; reinsured in Liv. and Lon. and Globe. 
Oswego and Onondaga, New York; reinsured in Commercial Union. 
Paterson, N. J. ; failed. 
Phoenix, S. Louis; reinsured in the Queen. 
Residence, Cleveland, O.; reinsured in Scottish Commercial. 
United States, St. Louis; reinsured in Scottish Commercial. 

1878. 
American, Cincinnati; failed. 

Anthracite, Philadelphia; reinsured in the Sun of Philadelphia. 
Capital City, Washington, D. C; failed. 
Capital City, Albany, N. Y.; reinsured in the Lancashire. 
City, St. Louis; reinsured in Queen. 
Commerce, New York, reinsured in Star. 
Empire, Chicago; failed. 

Fame, Philadelphia; reinsured in Liverpool and London and Globe. 
Farmville, Va.; reinsured. 

Fidelity, Delphos, O.; reinsured in the Fireman's Fund of California. 
Franklin, Baltimore; retired. 

Franklin, St. Louis; reinsured in Home of New York. 
Gebhard, New York; absorbed by Star of New York. 
Guaranty, New York; reinsured in the Royal. 
Hibernia, Cleveland, 0.; retired. 
Homestead, Watertown, N. Y.; failed. 
Lancaster, Pa.; risks run out. 

Lumberman's and Mechanics', St. Louis; reinsured in National of N. Y. 
New York Produce Exchange; reinsured in Safeguard of New York. 
Phcenix, Newark; retired. 
Resolute, New York; absorbed by the New York City. 



1879. 

Adriatic, New York; reinsured in London and Lancashire. 

.•Etna, New York ; reinsured in Home of N. Y. 

Amity, N. Y. ; reinsured in Star. 

Atlantic, Brooklyn; reinsured in Home of N. Y. 

Clay F. & M., Covington, Ky,; reinsured in Buffalo German. 

Federal, Allegany : reinsured. 

Fireman's Fund, New York ; reinsured in Peoples of Newark. 

Germania, Elizabeth, N. J.; reinsured in La Caisse Generales. 

Hoboken, N. J.; reinsured in London and Lancashire. 

Home, Newark ; reinsured in Queen. 

Jefferson, St. Louis ; reinsured in the Tradesmen's, N. Y. 

Manayunk, Phila.; retired. 

Michigan State, Adrian ; reinsured in Home of N. Y. 

New York Central. Union Springs, N. Y.; retired. 

Ohio, Chillicothe, O.; reinsured in North German. 

Safeguard, New York ; reinsured in the London and Lancashire. 

State, New Jersey ; reiosured in Westchester of N. Y. 

St. Joseph, Mo.; reinsured in German American of N. Y. 

St. Louis, Mo.; reinsured in Queen. 

Washington, New Jersey ; reinsured in the German American of N. Y. 

1880. 

Alliance, Boston; reinsured in Re-Assurance Generales. 

City, Providence; reinsured in Imperial and Northern. 

Delaware State, Wilmington, Del.; failed. 

Enterprise, Pittsburg, Pa.; retired ; risks allowed to expire. 

Fairfield, So., Norwalk, Ct.; reinsured in the Niagara of New York. 

Faneuil Hall, Boston; reinsured in the Underwi iters' Agency of New 
York. 

Fidelity, Cincinnati ; reinsured in the Washington of Cincinnati. 

Granite, Richmond; reinsured in Connecticut Fire. 

Hibernia, Newark ; reinsured in the German American of New York. 

Home, Charleston, S. C; reinsured in the Phoenix of London. 

Home, St. Louis; reinsured in the American Central. 

La Caisse Generales, Paris ; retired from the U. S. 

Madison, Wis.; reinsured in Westchester of New York. 

Mechanics, Newark; reinsured in the German American of New York. 

New England, Boston ; reinsured in La Caisse Generales. 

Pacific, St. Louis ; reinsured in American Central. 

Scottish Commercial, Glasgow; retired from the U. S.; reinsured in 
the Lancashire. 

Seaboard, Norfolk, Vt.; failed. 

Shawmut, Boston ; reinsured in Re-Assurance Generales. 

1881. 

Atlas, Hartford; retired, risks continued to expiration. 
Atlantic (Mutual), Boston; reinsured in the Equitable of Providence. 
Beverly, Mass.; reinsured in the Shoe and Leather of Boston. 
Colorado, Denver; failed. 

Hoffman, New York; reinsured in the Niagara of New York. 
Home, Iowa; absorbed by Cedar Rapids Insurance Company. 
Hope, New York; merged in the Sterling of New York. 
Jefferson, Steuben ville, 0.; reinsured in Jefferson of New York. 
Lycoming (Mutual), Muncy, Pa.; failed. 

Mechanics', Boston; reinsured in the Scottish Union and National. 
New York and Boston, New York; reinsured in Scottish Union and 
National and Lion of England. 
New York City, New York; reinsured in the Standard of London. 
Northern, Watertown, N. Y.; retired, risks run out. 
Old North State, Warrenton, N. C; retired, risks allowed to terminate. 
People's, Trenton, N. J.; reinsured in the German American of N. Y. 
Phoenix, St. Louis; reinsured in the Queen. 
Phcenix, Memphis, Tenn.; reinsured. 

Revere, Boston; reinsured in the Fire Insurance Association of London. 
St. Nicholas, New York; reinsured in the German American of N. Y. 

1882. 

Columbia, New York ; reinsured in the Merchants of Newark. 

City, Richmond, Va.; reinsured in the Underwriters' Agency of New 
York. 

Citizens, Washington, D. C; reinsured in the Firemen's of Washington. 

Commonwealth, Boston ; reinsured in the Commercial Union. 

Denver Fire (wild cat), Col.; collapsed. 

Franklin, Boston ; reiosured in the Scottish Union and National. 

Home, Columbus, Ohio ; failed. 

Importers and Traders, New York ; reinsured in the American of N. Y. 

Lamar, New York ; reinsured in the Phoenix of Brooklyn. 

Lenox, of New York ; reinsured in the Citizens', New York. 

Lynchburg Banking and Ins. Co., Va.; retired from the insurance 
business. 

Manhattan, New York ; reinsured in the Phcenix of Brooklyn. 

Manufacturers, Newark ; reinsured in Germania of New York. 

Merchants and Mechanics, Richmond ; reinsured in Underwriters' 
Agency. 

Newark City, Newark, N. J.; reinsured in the Citizens of New York. 

Peoples, Newark ; reinsured in the Niagara of New York. 

Republic, New York ; reinsured in the North British and Mercantile. 

Relief, New York ; reinsured in the Niagara Fire. 

Watertown, New York ; retired ; merged in the Sun Fire Office of 
London. 

1883. 

^Etna (wild cat), Denver, Col.; failed. 

American, Chicago ; reinsured in the Home. 

Argentine, Col.; failed. 

Citizens, Evansville, Ind. ; reinsured in the Niagara of N. Y. 

Columbus Ins. and Banking Company, Miss.; reinsured in Phoenix of 
London. 

La Confiaoce, Paris; retired from U. S.; reinsured in the Howard of 
New York and the Manufacturers of Bostun. 

Lorillard, New York ; reinsured in the Guardian of London. 

Metropole, Paris; retired from the U. S. ; reinsured in the Niagara of 
New York. 



Feb. 7, 1880. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



<rk ; rwuartd In th« German AmArfau Insurance 

nv of New Vuric. 

Pueblo (wild cat). OoLj failed. 

Ri \— iri' . I'.tri* ; retired from the V. S.; reinsured in 

tin- Craaoant "f New Orl?»n*. 

I ml Kir..- Office, 1. -m! hi ; retired from the V. S.; reinsured In tho 
I'lin nix ..f Brooklyn. 

Trid.'-ui.-n'-*, New Vnrk ; relnaured in Standard »>f London. 

Union, Cincinnati, (.».; retired ; ri^kn continued to expiration. 

ISM. 

Bi ffaio, Buffalo, N. V.; reinsured in tha Phconb of Brooklyn. 

t Snmmeraial, New York ; rainanred In the Exchange Fire of New York. 

Delaware Fin-, Wilmington, Del.; retired. 

Fireman's Trust, Brooklyn, N. V. ; reinsured in the American of 
Newark. 

Gloucester, Gloucester, Mass.; reinsured in the Westchester, New York, 

Hudson, Jersey Citv, N. J.: reinsured in the United States Fire of 
N.-w York. 

Irvin,', New York ; reinsured in the United Fire Reinsurance Com- 
pane "f England. 

necnanics and Traders, New Vnrk ; retired. 

Merchnnta Marine, Bangor, Me.; retired. 

t Iskalooaa, Fire, Iowa ; reinsured in the Cedar K*pids Insurance Com- 
pany. 

Shoe and Leather, Boston; reinsured iu Niagara of New York and 
the Pirn -nix Insurance Company of Brooklyn. 

Virginia Home; reinsured in the Phoanix of London. 

Western F. ,V M. and P. G., Chicago; reinsured in the Fire Associa- 
tion of Philadelphia. 

SUNBEAMS. 

The now waiter at an Austin restaurant asked Jim Talbott, who was 
just aliout t" tackle a beefsteak: "Are you superstitious?" "No; why 
dojouask?" "I've got no particular reason, except that you are the 
thirteenth man who has used that napkin today." — Texas Sif tings. 

The following parody on " Webster's Unabridged " was displayed on 
Brattleboro'a town-hail walls: " if Eny one Wants thure Washing and 

[ruing Done for a 75 cent and dune up in Stile Call at Miss South 

Slain St." St. Albans Messenger. 

A Boston doctor, who has just retired with a bit* fortune, says he drew 
reuudiea for corns and consumption from the same keg, and most of his 
patients got well. This is believed to be the first physician who ever 
confessed. 

Don't call a man a dutikey, my son, because he won't hear to reason ; 
but politely remind him that the man with the biggest ears is least in- 
clined to use them. — Boston Transcript. 

" Yes," said the Scissors to the Paste Pot, " first there was the Golden 
Age, then came the Silver Age and the Brazen Age, and now comes the 
Mucil Age," whereat the Paste Pot went into convulsions. — Boston Globe. 

A Russian editor named Katcoff sympathizes with the Czar. A man 
with that name has probably had bricks and old bottles and bootjacks 
enough slung at him to make him sympathize with anybody. 

" I will withdraw my suit, ' remarked young Jobson, as he counted 
up his cash and found that it corresponded with the sum on his pawn- 
ticket. — Brooklyn Times. 

Sara Bernhardt has received a proposal of marriage from a corpulent 
Englishman. At least we suppose he is corpulent, for it is stated that he 
is perfectly in fat- Mated. (Seven of these for a dollar). 

The principal seasons illustrated at the roller-skating rink are 
" fall "and " spring." Some of the remarks they provoke are summery. 

— Noii\ Herat U. 

In Iceland a man is not only permitted but expected to kiss every wo- 
man be meets. That explains why the Icelanders never leave their native 
isle. — Phila. Inquirer. 

A Stock Yards young lady at a ball, the other evening, referred to 
her gentleman escort as an Indian, " for," said Bhe, "he is always on my 
trail." —Chicago Sun. 

" Why do you call me birdie, my dear?" inquired a wife of her hus- 
band. "Because you are always associated in my mind with a bill," was 
the answer. — Neivark Reg. 

The latest atrocity in Indianapolis hotel French is: "Soup— Potato, 
a la pome de tare." We challenge the world to enter a sweepstakes com- 
petition. 

BANKS. 

BANK OF BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

Incorporated by Royal Charter.— Capital paid op, 81,730,- 
000, with power to increase to $10,000,000. Reserve Fund, §250,000. Southeast 
corner California and Sansome streets. Head Office — 28 Cornhill, London. 
Branches — Portland, Oregon; Victoria and New Westminster, British Columbia. 

Itiis Bank transacts a General Banking Business. Accounts opened subject to Check 
and Special Deposits received. Commercial Credits granted available in all parts of 
the world. Approved Bills discounted and advances made on good collateral security. 
Draws direct at current rates upon its Head Office and Branches, and upon its Agents 
as follows : 

New York, Chicago and Canada — Bank of Montreal; Liverpool — North and South 
Wales Bank ; Scotland —British Linen Company ; Ireland — Bank of Ireland ; Mex- 
ico and South America — London Bank of Mexico and South America ; China and 
Japan— Chartered Bank of India, Australia and China ; Australia and New Zealand 
— Bank of Australasia, Commercial Banking Company of Sydney, English, Scottiah 
and Australian Chartered Bank. 

SECURITY SAVINGS BANK. 

GUARANTEE CAPITAL, 8300,000. 

Officers: Vice-President. Jerome Lincoln : Secretary, W. 
S. Jones ; Attorney, Sidney V. Smith. Loans made on Real Estate and other 
Approved Securities. Office : No. 215 Sansome street, San Francisco. Oct. 1. 



LONDON, PARIS AND AMERICAN BANK LIMITED , 

205 Sanaome Street- 

Autliorl/.cl Cnpitnl 83,000.000 

Niibserlbetl Cnpllul -j... no nun 

Paid Dp 2,000,000 

DAVID CAIIN M»liaKvr| KU11ENK MKYKIl BaMianigW 

ll.-i.d Ollico. (l 10 TOKE1TH008B YARD, LOTffBURY, LONDOS 
AircuL.- NEW yORK; Agonoj ol tho London, ['nrl« ud Amorloan But 
(Limited), 40 HxchuigQ Place. PARIS: Mann. Lajtard Proras&Cie, L0Ruo8to.Ci cllo. 
Draw Direct "ii the Prlncipil CUlesof the United States, Qreal Britain, Inland 

France. [Icrmmiy, Bus..!.., Austria, Italy, llclirinm, Uoilend, Spain. Switzerland 
China, Japan, Australia, Central and Booth Amorloa COMMERCIAL and TBAV- 
ELERS' CREDITS lamed, arallahle throughout the world, COLLECTIONS HADE 
at current Rites u! cxrlcui::.' Issue I'Kli'n Fll 'A'l'KS or III Is is. II 
posit* on oiwn accounts. 11ULLION and FOREIUN COINS DOUfrhl and II. 



THE BANK OF CALIFORNIA, SAN FRANCISCO. 

Capital $3,000,000. 

WM. ALTORD President. 

THOMAS BBOWN, Cnsbler I B. MURRAY, Jr., Am'* Cashier 
Agents : 

New York, Agency of tho Bank of California; Boston, Tremont National Bank. 
Chicago, Union National Bank ; St. Louis, Boatman's Saving Bank ; New Zealand, 
tho Bank of Now Zealand. Correspondent in London, Messrs. N. M. Rothschild & 
Suns. Correspondents in India, China, Japan and Australia, . 

The Bank has Agencies at Virginia City, and Correspondents in all the princi- 
pal Mining Districts and Interior Towns of the Pacifl Coast. 

Letters of Credit issued, available in all parts of the world. Draw direct on New 
York, Boston, Chicago, St. Louis, New Orleans, Denver, Salt Lake, Cincinnati, 
Portland, 0., Los Angeles, London, Dublin, Paris, Berlin, Bremen, Hamburg, 
Frankfort-on-the-Main, Antwerp, Amsterdam, Copenhagen, Stockholm, Christiana, 
Locarno, Melbourne, Sydney, Auckland, Hongkong, Shanghai, Yokohama, Genoa, 
and all cities iu Italy and Switzerland. 

THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Paid np Capital 91,500,000, Gold. President, Daniel Cal- 
lu-tiau. Vice-President, GEOIIQE A. LOW; Cashier, E. D. MORGAN* 
Assistant Cashier, GEO. W. KLINE. 

Directors.— D. Callaghan, C. G. Hooker, Peter Donahue, James Phelan, James 
Moffitt, N. Van Bergen, James II. Jennings, George A. Low. 

CORRESPONDENTS.— London : Bank of Montreal, No. 9 Birchin Lane, Lom- 
bard street. Dublin : Provincial Bank of Ireland. Hamburg : Hesse, Neuman 
& Co. Paris: Hottinguer & Co. Now York: National Bank of Commerce. Bos- 
ton : Blackstone National Bank. Chicago : First National Bank. This Bank is pre- 
pared to transact a general Banking business. Deposits in Gold, Silver and Currency 
received subject to check or on special deposit. Exchange for sale on the principal 
citiea of the United States, Great Britain, Ireland and the Continent. Commercia 
Credits issued available iu Europe, ChiLa and Japan. Collections attended to and 
prompt returns made at the lowest market rates of Exchange. June 28. 

THE CALIFORNIA SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY, 

N. W. Corner Eddy and Powell streets, San Francisco. 

Loans made on city and country real estate at current rates. Term and ordinary 
deposits received. Dividends paid in January and July, 
Last dividend, paid in January, 4.50 per cent. 

DIRECTORS— David Farquharson (President), Robert P. Bunker Vice-President), 
John Bain (Treasurer), John Euston (Surveyor), J. F. Cowdery (Attorney), A. 0, 
Corbctt, Edward Farrell, Joseph R. Wilcox, Thomas Downing, Charles D. Farquhar- 
son, C'has. Lux. [July 12.J Vernon Campbell, Secretary. 

LONDON AND SAN FRANCISCO BANK, LIMITED. 

Capital, $2,100,000. 

San Francisco Office, 424 California street; London Office, 
22 Old Broad street. Portland Branch, 48 First Street. 
Manager ARTHVR SCRIVENER. 

Assistant Manager, WILLIAM STEEL. London Bankers— Bank of England and 
London Joint Stock Bank; New York, Drexel, Morgan 4t Co. ; Boston, Third Na- 
tional Bank. This Bank is prepared to transact all kinds of General Banking 
and Exchange Business in London and San Francisco, and between said cities 
and all parts of the world. June 9. 

THE ANGLO-CALIFORNIAN BANK, LIMITED. 

N.E* Cor. Sansome and Fine Streets • 

Loudon Office, 3 Ani^el Conrt ; New York Agents, J. W. Bel- 
igman & Co., 21 Broad street. Authorized Capital Stock, 5(5,000,000. Will re- 
ceive Deposits, open Accounts, make Collections, buy and sell Exchange and Builiou, 
loan Money, and issue Letters of Credit available throughout the world. 

FRED. F. LOW, (.„„„„„„„ 

ION. STEINHART, \ Managers. 

P. N. Lilibnteal, Cashier. Sept. IS. 

THE NEVADA BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO. 

Capital Paid Up $3,000,000. 

Agency at New York, 62 Wall street. 

Agency at Virginia, Nev. 



Buys and sella Exchange and Telegraphic Transfers, 
elera' Credits. 



iBsues Commercial and Trav- 
Nov. 8. 



THE GERMAN SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 

Deatsche Spar nnd Lelhbank, No. 526 Calif ornlastreet, San 
Francisco. Officers : President, L. GOTTIG. Board of Directors.— L. 
Gottig, Fred Roeding, Cbas. Kohler, Edw. Kruse, George H. Eggers, N. Van Bergen, 
H L Simon, Peter Spreckels, A. E. Hecht. Secretary, GEO. LETTE; Attorneys, 
JARBOE & HARRISON. May 18. 

Oharles Orocker, R. 0. Woolworth. Wm. H, Crocker 

CROCKER, WOOLWORTH & CO., 

BANKERS 
322 PINE STREET * SAN FRANCISCO. 

("larry on a General Banking Business. Correspondents 
J in the principal cities of the Eastern States and in Europe. June 16. 



SAN FRANC] SCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Feb. 7, 1885. 



PLEASURE'S WAND. 

' We Obey no Wand bat Pleasure's."— How Moore. 

The popularity of melodrama is said to be on the decline. This 
may be so, but it is not as yet apparent. The success of The Shadows of a 
Great City is surely not a sii;n of any lessened interest in the extravagant 
style of sta^e literature. The bulk of paying audiences are made up of 
people with well defined, sentimental sympathies — sympathies which do 
not reason. Tuey want ideal virtue and ideal vice — not the vice and vir- 
tue of real life. These are never so black or so white as \*- is customary 
to paint them. It may be that, with the daily rising standard of educa- 
tion, popular taste in theatrical matters will be elevated to a preference 
for work of a more intellectual character, but it is more than probable, 
as Boucicault says, tbat the modern, stirring melodrama, which, in many 
cases, has a basis of genuine human nature, presenting life as it is in the 
first act, and as we should wish it to be in the last act, will never go 
altogether out of popular liking. The majority of people look to a theatre 
more for animal than for mental relaxation, and this accounts not only 
for the success of melodrama, but also for that of the " horse- play " style 

of entertainment. 

* # * * * 

The good acting in The Shadow « of a Gi cat Cif^must be considered, also, 
as one of the reasons for the hit of this play. It is seldom that one sees 
a cast in which every actor and actress is so well suited to the character 
he or she assumes. Stockwell, Odborne and Jean Clara Waters are as 
genuinely and characteristically natural in their acting as the most 
bigoted realist could wish for. With Jean Clara Walters and Stockwell 
it is more a question of nature than one of art. With Osborne it is 
purely a question of versatile art. We are not sufficiently proud of this 
clever actor. He is a talented fellow, who grasps a character in all its 
points, and portrays it truthfully and consistently. In his make-up and 
costume he is always not only congruous, but even typical, and the same 
fidelity to an adopted idea is to be noticed in his facial expression and in 
his by-play. Isabel Morris charms us b.y her simple, unaffected girlish- 
ness as Helen Standish, and satisfies our desire for artistic work by her 
Annie Staudish. The contrast between tha impersonations of mother 
and daughter is striking in its sharpness. It is not a mere question of 
different habiliments or of different make-up; there id a significant depth 
i>f expression tbat accentuates the difference between the two beings. 
The buoyancy of the happy young girl is as unmistakably expressed as 
the sorrow of the despairing, dying mother. The sense of premature 
age, brought on by misery and want, is not conveyed by a mere penciling 
of wrinkles ; it is more than skin-deep — it is indicated by tone and ex- 
pressiveness of voice. Both as mother and daughter, Miss Morris has to 
be pathetic, and a finer touch of art cannot be desired than is shown by 
the dissimilarity between the misery of the one and the grief of the other. 
The two characters played by Lewis Morrison and Gerald Eyre are purely 
conventional and within the abilities of any manly actor who is versed in 
the technique of the stage. For some reason or other, it has become cus- 
tomary to praise E. N. Tbayer in a cela va sans dire way. The why 
and wherefore of this I do not know. His speech and gestures are with- 
out extravagance, but he is thoroughly superficial and perfunctory in his 
acting. 

***** 

The Dalys have kicked their way through three weeks ot romping. 
They will make room for Oliver Doud Byron. When Byron was last 
here he played in several melodramas of an exaggerated type of frontier 
heroism, which were very amusing. I believe be has abandoned this 
style of play for something else quite as exciting. 

***** 

Herve's Le Petit Faust, a remarkable operatic satire, will follow Lortz- 
in&'s z t'' and Ziiiimcrinann, at the Tivoli. The music of this operetta is 
sprightly and sparkling, and is composed in a most masterly manner. 
***** 

A lot of bad actors are wandering around in an aimless manner on the 
Grand Opera House stage, in a framework of most beautiful scenery. 
The dismal nights at this theatre will soon give way to the dazzling scenes 
of a Patti performance — a remarkable contrast, to be sure. 

The opera season (Mapleson's) is supposed to commence three weeks 
from next Monday. The advance agent has arrived, and is making his 
preparations for the opening of the box-office^ I am curious to see how 
the sale of tickets will be managed this year. 

This afternoon, at 2 o'clock, the extra Philharmonic Concert takes 
place. A large audience is assured. The programme is a promising 

one. 

***** 

Edgar S. Kelly's Macbeth music will be played by a large orchestra 
next Friday afternoon at Piatt's Hall. George Wessels will read the dif- 
ferent scenes of which the numbers in Mr. Kelly's composition are illus- 
trative. The musical work is a very ambitions one, and it is with curios- 
ity that its rendition is awaited. 

***** 

Actors are proverbially superficial, and aside from the lines that they 
speak, and a knowledge of the rudiments of their art, they usually know 
very little. There are, of course, exceptions to this rule. There are in 
the ranks of the dramatic profession many men of fine talents, thorough 
education and possessed of all the grades of refinement and good breeding, 
but the rank and file is usually made up of those whose ignorance and 
narrow mindedness are glossed over with a very thin veneer. The Booths 
and the Barretts of the profession are men of culture of a general kind. 
The Keenes and the McCulloughs are those who know little or nothing 
aside from their acquaintance with their art. The undoubted superiority 
of Continental Euio;jean actors as delineators of character, is due to the 
fact that their education and knowledge is of the broadest. The actor, 
as well as the painter or the musician, improves as his intellect is devel- 
oped. The broadening of his intelligence will not only give him a deep- 
er iusight into human character, but will also suggest to him with all 
minutiie the means to delineate its different phases. As a rule actors on 
the American stage rely upon advancement more up n ingenious puffery, 
and their good fellowship and siH-ial qualities, than upon an addition to 



their acquirements and abilities. With plenty of spare time at their dis- 
posal and every facility for strengthening and building up their minds, 
there is no reason why actors should not be among the most cultured of 
men. 

***** 

Rossini used to tell a tale about a trick Paganini played on the French 
violinist, Lafont. This artist came to Milan determined to crush the 
charlatan Paganini, and invited him to play a duet with him at his con- 
cert in the Scala. Paganini asked if he ought to refuse. " E perche," 
was the reply, "he would say you are afraid!" Lafont wanted to 
send Paganini his part to study, but Paganini, who played at sight, as 
no one else did, refused, and only went to the rehearsal, where he quietly 
played bis part as it stood. But when the evening came, the wily Paga- 
nini put into his part, which poor Lafont had to play after him, such 
prodigious feats of technical skill, that the Frenchman fairly lost his 
presence of mind, and made a terrible fiasco. Like a true Gaul, he went 
home and proclaimed Paganini a still greater charlatan and intriguant 
than he had ever been thought, and this reputation lasted until the great 
virtuoso went and took Paris by storm. 

The first time an author was called before the curtain by the audience 
was at the production of Merope, by Voltaire. What was originally a 
homage paid to genius has since degenerated into a stage custom, and now 
in England, France, and rapidly making way in this country, the author 
is called for whether the piece is a decided successor not.— Filippo 
Kamagnoli, the great Italian violinist and modern Paganini, died last 
month in Macerata, at the age of sixty-one years. -^—Director Pollini, of 
Hamburg, has discovered another tenor, a laborer employed in a factory 
at Ottensen, and is having him educated for the stage. ^— John Bland, a 
respectable bank cashier in Leeds, is the last survivor of twelve children, 
one of whom was the late Adelaide Neilson, whose plain, prosaic name 
off the stage was Elizabeth Ann Bland. -^Johannes Brahms is said to 
have received the sum of 36,000 marks from hiB publishers for the copy- 
right of his Third Symphony, which is first to be broughtout at the next 
Wiillner concert in Berlin. This is the largest honorarium ever paid for 
a symphony. Joachim Raff received 180 marks for his most important 
one — " In the Forest." " A certain celebrated actress, on one occasion, 
received the following declaration: "Mademoiselle — I am only a poor 
worker, but I love you like a millionaire. While waiting to become one, 
I send you this bunch of violets. If my letter gives you a wish to know 
me, and to answer the sentiments of my soul, when you are on the stage 
to-night lift your eyes to the gallery — my legs will hang over." 

Beauclerc. 



PLATT'S HALL-GEORGE AUGUSTUS SALA, 

The Greatest Journalist of England! The Fashion and Favorite 
of the Hour! Will Lecture on WEDNESDAY and EB.IDAY 
EVENINQS, February 11th and 13th, upon Two Subjects 
from his 

Marvelous Experiences and Adventures During 30 Year» ! 

Regal Shows and Pageants— Wars, Tumults), Revolutions, Statesmen and 
Soldiers— Witty, Hnmorous, Entertaining and Instructive. 

Reserved Seats, SI; Boxes, $5. Admission, 50c. Seats on sale NEXT MONDAY, 
at SHERMAN & CLAY'S MUSIC STORE. 

PLATT'S MUSIC HALL, 

THVRVDAY A.FXERNOON, A.T 3 O'CLOCK, WEB. IS, 1SSS. 

FIRST PRODUCTION OF 

THE ENTIRE MUSIC TO MACBETH! 

By EDGAR S. KELLY (Opus 7), under the Direction of the Composer. Kindly 
Assisted by MESSKS. J. U. ROSEWALD ami LOUIS SCHMIDT, Sk. 

MELODRAMATIC BEADING Bv MR. GEO. WESSELS 

Orchestra of Fifty Performers. 

EXTRA PHILHARMONIC CONCERT, 

AT PLATT'S HALL, SATURDAY AFTERNOON, Feb. 7th, 

AT 2 O'CLOCK. 
G. HINRICHS, Director. 

MISS ANNA L. KELLEY, Vocalist. 

MISS BELLE WELTON, Pianist. 

Seats now on sale at SHERMAN, CLAY' & CO'S MUSIC HOUSE. Admission, SI. 
(No extra to reserve. ) 

BALDWIN THEATRE. 

MR. AL. HAY MAN Lessee and Manager 

Every Evening, including Sunday. Saturday Matinee at 2. Triumph upon Triumph ! 

Crowded Houses Nightly Attest the Popularity of Jefferson, Shewed & 

Jefferson's Great Play, 

SHADOWS OF A GREAT CITY! 

Pronounced by the press and public the Best Acted and Finest Production 
Seen This Season! 

SECURE YOUR SEATS. 

THE GRAND PACIFIC RINK, 

Cor. Sutter and Jones Sts. 

PROF, W. D. WILMOT. Champion Bicyclist of ths World I 
At Itiuk Every Evening This Week, and Wednesday and Saturday Afternoons. 

Pronounced by all the most Wonderful Kiier.and especially on Single Wheel. 



K.I.. 7, 1885. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



SPORTING. 



Yachting. The S*n Francisco yachtsman, who recently wrote from 
New fork :»«> <ii»par»*;ini:ly of the I'armelita, has come out nobly and 
atlinitted that he wu mistaken. When his 6rec notice of Mr. Coleman's 
yacht appeared it was ao obviously absunl that we doubted either the 
writer's nimvritv or capacity, and treated his criticism as it deserved, 
His second n?|*>rt is full of appreciative adjectives, and inflicntes that 
the writer has really seen the yacht he describes. Judged by tin's «le- 
■eription, the Carmelita is all that any yachtaman could desire for her 
inches. Her rik', hull, cabin and finish show fine workmanship, excel- 
lent design and all possible recent improvements. The k'"od taste mani- 
fested every where is most pleasing to the eye, while comfort in oraitunjl 
has nowhere been overlooked. The same critic adds what we have al- 
ways claimed for her model and rig great speed and weatherliuess. The 
f oreat and Stream has recently published both the lines and spar plan of 
inuelita, and the yacht editor, 0. P. Kunhardt, has gi^en her 
measurements most accurately, adding to them a description of the yacht 
aloft and heloir. It is well written, caudid and favorable, but critical 
withal. We shall find room for Mr. Kunbardt's notice next week, as all 
our yachting readers are eager to get the most accurate details in refer- 
ence to this handsome craft. The Chispa made a short cruise on Satur- 
day and Sunday, The breeze on Sunday afternoon was very strong, es- 
iwcially off Yellow Head. Sever*] private yacht clubs are looking out 
tor boats to cruise in during the coming summer. 

The Ring. —Whistler's fight with Brady, last week, proved to be no 
fight at all. The wrestler is a match for any man iu an open-handed 
struggle, but is the merest tyro in the use of his closed fists. He pretends 
that he is anxious to try again. We do not, usually, offer cheap advice, 
but if the Champion Grfeco- Roman Wrestler has any regard for the fame 
he has won on the tarpaulin, he will do well to keep out of the prize ring. 
The fight between Palmer and Hamilton, on Tuesday night, was hotly 
contested ; there was not a great deal of skill displayed on either side, but 
Palmer proved himself the better boxer all through. Hamilton tried to 
knock his man out in the first round, but he met a Tartar. Nine rounds 
were fought ; twice the referee refused to allow very palpable fouls against 
Hamilton, but the third was so barefaced and glaring that he could do 
nothing else but give the fight to Palmer. Prior to the principal event of 
the night, several so-called amateurs battered each other in very lively 
fashion. The show lasted until long past midnight. The cloudy atmos- 
phere of the Wigwam is full of promised fights. Dutchy and Downey, 
Crane and Carr, Johnson and O'Brien. Crane has also challenged Brady. 
Brady states his willingness to meet Sullivau, should the latter live to 
visit San Francisco. Patrons of the manly art will find a large demand 
made upon their loose dollars when all these fights are ended. Harry 
Maynard, as usual, manages these contests, and to his credit we must 
state that he holds his men with a tight rein. They must play if they ex- 
pect pay. 

Rowing.— The event of to-day is the Hanlan and Clifford match over 
the Paramatta River course, in Port Jackson. We think Hanlan will 
win, but not as easily as he was wont to do in earlier days. The Beach 
and Hanlan match is fixed for the last day in the month. Beach is the 
favorite with the Sydney people. The South End Club appears to have 
more vitality than all the others put together. Last Sunday two barge- 
crews rowed a four-oared race in the Garfield and Flyblister. The course 
was from off Third-street wharf, around Mission Rock and back. The 
Flyblister four proved themselves the best men. The Pacific Coast Row- 
ing Association is still in existence, but it might as well be dead. There 
is ample work for it to do, but it never makes a move. If it was dead 
and decently buried, some men might be found to take its palpable duties 
in hand. The first duty of a Rowing Association is to promote rowing, 
and that is just what the Pacific C. R. A. does not attempt. 

The Game Laws.— There was a joint meeting of the Senate and As- 
sembly held at Sacramento, last Friday week. Several sportsmen were 
also present at the meeting, the object being to amend the game laws. 
Nothing was done. The difficulty in framing game laws for this State is 
that its conditions are so widely different. A good law in San Diego 
county may work a hardship in Shasta. The fish question and sawdust 
again came up, and, as usual where money conflicts with sport, coin is 
sure to win. The proposal to license salmon fishing boats is a good one, 
if the funds collected were expended in protecting the fish. But to use it 
in paying the members of the Fish Commission would be absurd. Two 
of the present Fish Commissioners have shown such incapacity for their 
work, and wrong headedness in attempting to fill their positions, that we 
think the State might with advr ntage pay them to do nothing until their 
term of office expires. We do not include Mr. Redding. 

Bicycling.— The Bay City Wheelmen have decided to give another 
tournament. The date is fixed for the 30th of May, but the place has 
not yet been decided upon. The mile maiden race, which took place at 
the recent tournament, ended unsatisfactorily, and will be run over again 
at the Bay District Tract on 15th February. Professor Wilmot has been 
giving exhibitions of fancy bicycling at the Grand Pacific Rink during 
the week, and will appear again at the same place this evening. His 
feats upon the machine are marvelous, and would be regarded as impossi- 
sible but that one is compelled to believe his own eyes. He rides at full 
speed, and then stands erect in the saddle. From the seat he reaches to 
the floor and lifts a handkerchief without easing off from a four-minute 
gait. On the single wheel his doings must be seen to be appreciated. 
They beggar description. 

Fishing, — Bay fishing last Sunday was not very good. The large tides 
and the heavy swell from the ocean making it disagreeable for those who 
tried the Marin shore near the Heads. At Tiburon several good catches 
of fine smelt were taken, giving the anglers with light tackle excellent 
sport. Flounders were again abundant, the baskets and strings brought 
home on the late boat being very large. The run of young Salmon alone: 
the water front has almost ceased. We have not heard of any catches 
for ten days past. Last Sunday seventeen stalwart anglers journeyed to 
Olema, bent on catching salmon, and the whole party returned late in 
the day, tired and disgusted. Not one of them succeeded in taking a fish. 



Rlfle-Shootlng. The Pacific Club opened their practice 'it Shell 
Moand last Sunday. The Attendance Of im-mhor* was not larRO. Tin- 

■hooting varied from g l to fair and vny poor. The following 

were made at 200 Yards, in shots each J ECelloffg 45, Hovey 44, Moor* 
and Cowing each 43, Johnson 42, Vanghan 11, Wallace 37, McDonald 35 
and Swing 27. At 500 yards Vanghan made 48, DIen l"., Moore 44, 
MoDonald 42 and Kellogg 39. Last week Dr. Carver loot at 64,881 
nieces of coal and wood, and bit with a ritlt? ballet 60,016. The trial 
lasted during six days. 

Duck Shooting. The season is practically over. The Cordelia Oloh 
has given up the Bport for the season. The house built on the Lolita has 
been taken off, and the yacht will soon com- down here to clean up and 
refit for the yachting season. Captain Chittenden i* always early in the 
field. Other Clubs in the Sniann marshes will sum follow suit, and the 
yachtsmen further up the river, with fine weather, will say good bye to 
duck hunting parties until next November. 

Quail and Snipe shooting still attracts a few veterans, but the suc- 
cess met with rarely pays for the trouble. Mr. McShanb is very fond of 
snipe shooting; spent a day at Pleasanton last week. He fired at three 
snipe, all he saw, and killed two. Quail are very scarce and so wild that 
a man must climb like a cat to get near them. They are rarely found 
now except upon the hills and where the brush and cover is thick. 

Baseball —The California League commenced operations for the sea- 
son at Central Park last Sunday, when the Haverly Nine defeated the 
San Francisco team by a score of 7 to 5. The play was evenly good 
throughout. To-morrow the Occidental and Star Nines will try conclu- 
sions at the same place, and the matches will be played every Sunday un- 
til the end of the year. 

Wrestling.— Ross appears to have got himself well advertised, through 
reports in the press that he was going to preach the gospel of peace. Now, 
he promises to come here and wrestle Whistler. They will certainly attract 
a crowd, and, although we have very little faith in any match they may 
make, yet they can make a very intersting exhibition— well worth seeing. 

The Olympic Club expects to take possession of its new rooms about 
the first week in March. The fittings will take a long time to put in 
place. We are glad to know that there is a steady addition to tbe list of 
members, and that many of the candidates are men of means and standing. 

The Fifth Annual Culinary Ball, which took place at Saratoga Hall 
on last Tuesday evening, was a pronounced success in every respect. Six 
hundred guests, including the elite of the city, were present, and as every 
arrangement for the comfort and convenience of the company was perfect, 
a most enjoyable time was passed. Tbe supper was naturally an especial 
attraction, and the tables of the dining-room did present a very beautiful 
appearance. 

BUSH-STREET THEATRE. 

Mr. M. B. LEAVITT. Lessee and Manager | Ma. JAY RIAL Acting Manager 



■Lost Week! "The Talk of the Town!" 
THOMAS A.— WILLIAM, Ju.-ROBERT-DANIEL-LIZZIE DERIOUS DALY! 

THE DALYSI 
And their Own Oreat Company, in Thos. A, Daly'8 Masterpiece of Ingenuity, entitled 

VACATION; OR. HARVARD Versus YALE! 

Unctiaai* ly Amusing! A Performance over which All tliu Town is Laughing! 
Matinees Wednesday and Saturday. Monday, Feb. 9th— Oliver Doud Bynm 

TlVOtl OPERA HOUSE. 

ddy street, near Market.— K relink Bros., Sole Proprietors 

and Managers. — Last Nights! Lortztng's Beautiful Opera, 

Peter the Shipwright! 
(Czaar und Zimmerman), 
Produced with Excellent Cast and Chorus and Elegant Costumes and Scenery. 
Monday Evening, Feb. 9th — Bellini's Popular Grand Opera, LA SONNAMBULA. 
In Active Preparation— LITTLE FAUST. 
Admission, 25c; Reserved Seats, 50c. 



E 



AUCTION ! 



On the Evenlus »l TIIIIISIIAV NEXT, February laili, at 
7:30 o'clock, at the <J A I.I. Kit I ts of THE S A.\ FRANCISCO 
ART ASSOCIATION, 130 PINE STREET, I purpose selling 
by Anctlou, through Messrs. Eastou «v Eltlrhlgre. my Eutlre 
Collection of PAINTINGS AND DECORATIVE PARLOR 
SCREENS, my own work. 

The Collection will be on view day and evening: from MONDAY, the 9th, till the 
HOUR OF SALE, 7:30 p «■ ol THURSDAY, the 12th. 

NORTON BUSH. 




PUKE NATURAL 

Mineral 

Water! 

INDORSED BY THE MEDICAL PROFESSION. 
FOR SALE EVERYWHERE. DEPOT, 513 SACRAMENTO ST. 



The Best 



DR. CHARLES W. DECKER, 
DENTIST 

PHELAN'S BUILDING '. ..PARLORS 8,7,8,9,10 

Entrance 800 Market Street. 



SAM FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER A>~D 



Feb. 7. 



A SONNET. 

Embowered 'mid trees & lit;le coppice lies. 
Hid far away from ail the busy throng. 
There all is peace, and as you pass along 

Its mossy woodland paths, the birds arise 

From their low nests, and gaze with wondering eyes, 
And circling; rouud you sin? a joyous song. 
Fearless of evil, ignorant of wrong. 

Since there by act of man no creature dies. 

And like this sheltered peaceful spot are some 
Near whom no evil ever seems to stty ; 
In whose pure presence cruelty flies away. 

While malice, fraud, and strife are stricken dumb ; 

Whose lives, so full of charity and love. 

Are precious gifts to men from God above. 



V. 



GOSSIP FROM NEW YORK. 

New York, Jan. 22, 18S5. —The jury in the second of the now some- 
what celebrated Huntington-Central-Pacific-RaiJroad-Stock cases came 
into court this morning and announced that, after being out all night, 
they hid agreed to disagree. This announcement would, doubtless, have 
pleased Huntington, had he been present, for it pleased his advocate, 
Roscoe Conkling, who was present, and whose features were all wreathed 
in smiles as of perpetual sunshine. In the first case your readers will re- 
member the jury came in after an hoar's consideration, and gave a ver- 
dict for the plaintiff for the full amount of the claim, and Conkli:: g 
tures wore a scowl that must have scared the jury out of their seven 
senses. The agreement to disagree in the second case was upon a state 
of facts identical with those in the first, and vet the intelligent jury, af- 
ter an all-night's seance, couldn't agree. All of which again illustrates 
how uncertain are the verdicts of petit juries. When the jury had an- 
nounced the result of their investigations, the presiding judge smiled and 
said: "Gentlemen, you are discharged for the term. Mr. Clerk, call the 
next case." An 1 the next case explained that the presence in court of a 
horde of California mine experts was not due to any interest in Hunting- 
ton's case, but in that of " Butler vs. Lounsberry." as it was announced. 
This proved to be the Excelsior Gravel suit, to which I referred in a for- 
mer letter, wherein the plaintiffs, who were subscribers to the at 
the Excelsior Gravel Company, which was engineered and promoted for 
A. Garnett by Lounsberry & Haggin, of New York. 

This explained why Gen. James B. Haggin, of your city, the Grand 
Turk of Mining and Finance, was present in court, surrounded by a per- 
fect cloud of witnesses and experts, brought on from the Pacific C 
prove that Smart's Diggings. Yuba county — alias Excelsior Gravel— was 
the best gold mine in the State of California. Near Gen. Haggin. and 
another within easy reaching distance of his searching glance, were seat- 
ed Professor Thomas Price, who looked one of the most interested of the 
spectators ; hard by sat Professor Louis Janin, the grander expert, who 
was looking through hts eye-glasses with a far away, dreamy expression, 
as though he was back to his olive groves in Santa Barbara ; Professor 
Hamilton Smith, Jr., and James D. Hague conversed eagerly in quiet 
and Professor William Ashburaer's silvered head was seen and New 
Yorkers wondered if he had made any recent reports on Robinson Con- 
solidated. A couple of what must be horny-tasted miners from the wilds 
of Yuba were also en hand to testify to the wealth of that section. The 
experts all examined the mine, and reported favorably. They will en- 
deavor to show to a New York jury that had it not been far fortuitous 
circumstances — specially the injunction under the debris law, which re- 
strained them from operating, that Excelsior Gravel should still be pay- 
ing dividenis instead of levying assessments to the disgust of stockhold- 
ers. Mr. Haggin will prove his entire good faith in placing the property, 
and in answer to the charge of paying dividends oat of borrowed money, 
as is alleged by the plaintiffs, will say chat his faith in the mining property 
was so great that, believing it would come oat all right, he advanced the 
money for dividends, expecting to be repaid oat of the future profits of 
the property. 

Haggin is making the biggest kind of a fight, assisted by all the avail- 
able expert and legal talent. He deems his reputation somewhat at stake, 
and is determined to come oat of court vindicated. The plaintiff is main- 
ly represented by Sawyer Birdseye, a brother of J. C. Birdseye, former- 
ly of Nevada County, who subscribed for $25,000 worth of stock. In 
looking over th» array of legal talent one cannot regret that the case will 
not be tried by mining lawyers, like Judge Garberor Harry Thornton, of 
your city, who would know what the experts were talking about. New 
York lawyers know no more about mines than they do of steam- boating. 
Bat the case will be interesting, nevertheless, and will attract crowded 
houses as soon as the outsiders know about the attraction. And how the 
Jury may decide is "mighty onsartin." 

Joe Clark says that the French bali. which came of! on Monday night 
last, was the boss one of the season. When I saw the genial Joseph 
meandering around the floor with a Cupid on one arm and a Baby on the 
other, I knew that he was having a good time. Several years ago, when 
a Carnival Ball was given at your Mechanics' Pavilion, in honor of Gen- 
eral Grant, I recollect Joe was there full of life, much attracted by an 
undressed Cupid, who turned oat to be Miss Dollie Adams. The same 
female was at the French Ball, and doubtless tha old acquaintance was 
renewed. The California Colony was well represented at the French 
Ball— and so were the parties and experts who have come on to attend 
the trial of the Excelsior Case. The professors were doubtless attracted 
by a desire to get on to the bedrock of New York's fastest society, and 
they succeeded. One dapper little professor wore a mask, bat disguise in 
his case was impossible. He said afterwards; " I went there expecting 
to see nobody whom I knew, and I wondered how it was so many knew 
me." The French ball was a grand success of its kind. The scenes in 
the sapper-rooms, in dark corners, and even in the boxes, made some of 
the oldest habitues blush. 

The weather has suddenly become intensely cold, much to the disgust 

st of visitors from the Paciric Coast. By the way, I see that the 

Rbws Letter, referring to some of the lights of negro minstrelsy, puts 

Billy Birch under the sod very unceremoniously. The writer must have 

_arley Backus in bis mind's eye. for Billy Birch is alive and muchly 

in the flesh. He lost all his cork-earned fortune by unlucky Wall-street 



J. W. Carmany. So. 35 Kearny street, has now on hand a magnificent 
assortment of all the latest styles in Shirts, Collars, Curls, Cravats, 
Scarfs, etc Call and examine them. 

INSURANCE. 



(Organized 1863.) 

FIREMAN'S FUND INSURANCE COMPANY. 

Fire and Marine Insurance- 

&1.500.000 Losses paJ.l over. So. 000. 000 

ffjjT" The L .. . i Largest loeume oi all the Companies hailing Croat 

■ west of Xew York State, and writes store Premiums on the Pacific Coast than any 
H other Company Local, Eastern or Foreign. 

D. J. STAPLES President! WM. J. DUTT- •>' Secretary 

ALPHKUS BCLL Vice- President | E. W. CARPENTER Asst. Secretary 

SO MB OFT ICE, 
SOUTHWEST COB. CALIFORNIA AND SANSOME STS., 

SAX FRANCISCO. 
Agents in all prominent localities. Sept. 13. 

PACIFIC DEPARTMENT 

LONDON AND LANCASHIRE FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY 

OF LIVERPOOL. 

Capital. $9,260,000 

Cash Assets 2,764.875 

Cash Assets in United States 1.398,548 

BALFOUR. GUTHRIE A. CO., General Affenis, 
March 20. 316 California Street, San Francisco. 



"investments.*' Then he had trouble with hisj>artners f and is now play- 
ins some of his " nigger " eccentricities at Tony Pastor a semi-variety 
show. Poor Billy, his has been a checkered career! 

Tbat reminds me about Charles Bernard, who used to be middle roan 
in San Francisco, with Birch and Backus as end men. Well. Charles m 
as rotund as ever and not much aged- He has retired from the show j 
business, and. move Bsftifirwin th»n Billy, put his money where it would 
yield hiin onmfort for life, instead of splendor for a year. 

Bogene Dewey and Harry Logan are not agreed as to the French ball. I 
j says it exceeded his most brilliant anticipations, while Barn 
said it was unusually dull and stupid. Gen. Haggin thought that, all ■ 
things considered, it was a pretty live gathering, and would be a success 
even in San Francisco. Gen. Haggin looked on with his very critical 
eye and hardly indulged in the saltatorial exercises of the night Prof. I 
Thomas Price was asked bow he liked the ball, just as if he had been h 
there, but he only closed one eye and said: " Haggin and I were busy < 
with Louis Janin all night, getting ready for the trial." Dave Ferris j 
has struck a big thing in telephoning. By the way, they are all striking j 
bis things in telephoning and electric contrivances. But Dave say- 
got it sure. Old Major Selover is making a big blow about his gas saving 
machine, but it is voted a nuisance generally, and his Blanchard Power , 
Electric Process a failure. Harry Thompson, a brother of William | 
rhompson, Jr.. who used to be a boon companion of Tom Bell in Belcher i 
days, is a conspicuous figure on Lower Broadway. He looks very like bis 
brother, and you would think him the same man. 

Well, au reroir. OOCASKHUL, 

SUPERS TIT I ON IN SHETLAND. 

AU fishing communities are superstitious, but the Shetlaoder has ' 
ac additional title to be so in his Norse descent. Old myths still linger 
in out-of-the-way localities, influencing the motions and molding the con- 
duct of many a fisher family. A belief in trows, elves, merman and 
meimaidens is universal. Wraiths and portents receive implicit credence. 
A woman washing her husband's clothes in a burn sees his trowsers fill 
with water, and infers from that an intimation of bis approaching death. 
Spey wives and dealers in charms and incantations still ply a mariu^ 
trade. There are drunken old hags in Lerwick itself who earn their live- 
lihood by imposing upon the creduli: at sailor* and silly 
servant girls. The influence of the evil eye is as well known in Shetland 
as in other parts of the world. But to rank an evil tongue in the same 
category of malefic potency is a refinement in superstition unknown to 
the folk-lore of the majority of people. 

• Nobody must praise a child or anything they set a value on, for if 
anything evil afterwards befalls it," this will be attributed to the I 
that spoke of it. This was called "fore-speaking," and persons so fore- 
spoken could only be loosed from their enchantment by being washed in 
a water of which the concoction is kept a profound secret, A relic of 
Popery seems to linger in the superstition which formerly restrained some 
of the lower classes from eating or drinking on Sunday till after Divine 
service. But it is difficult to find either rhyme or reasoil for the belief 
that, if two infants that have got no teeth meet in the same room, one 
of them will die immediately after. To hive one's way crossed, partic- 
ularly by the minister, when you go a fishing is reckoned unlucky. At 
funerals in the country districts it was usual to lift three clods and fling 
them one by one after the corpse. Many of the old people still collect 
wreck or driftwood with which to make their coffins — a custom which 
doubtless originated more in necessity than in sentiment. 

A trial for so-called blasphemy, reminding one of the religions prose- 
cutions in the Middle Ages has taken place at Odessa. The Criminal 
Court has sentenced a peasant, Anthony Preegoon, a member of the 
Bible-reading sect known as to imprisonment for three years 

and nine months, and loss of his personal rights, for baring preached 
against the image-worship of the Russian Church. The trial was held 
with closed doors; and although the majority of the witnesses swore that 
Preegoon had not used the words imputed to him, the jury, composed of 
four intelligent men and eight ignorant peasants, found him guilty. An- 
other strange feature in the trial was his being defended by a Jewish ad- 
vocate ; whereas Russian law forbids Jews to hold briefs in cases of 
heresy or blasphemy committed by Christians. 





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F.I.. 7, 1885. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISKR. 



AN AQONY OF AFFINITY. 

0, I ;iin a prim ;in.| p er ftCl lillde, 

My otoMfttu'i .i Work • >( art, 
Hut I bo through a world that i* rough and nidfl 

Willi a Hcret iwiin in my heart. 
I'm an thorough a dude as the city can ihow, 

Hut I HfoatimM with, filniotit, 
I were only a longshoreman, rough and low, 

Or a ngmot, tmpalp«bla ghost 
For my rebel heart lias a wild desire. 

And in drviuin it anoeMiAgl* calls 
For the girl in the rirCQfl who IWalloWB tire 

And joggles the cannon balls. 
If I were not a dnde I could woo and wed 

That maid with the cannon bail, 
Hut I know, in my agooiied heart and head, 

That it couldn't bo dado at all. 



-Puck. 



GAME BIRDS OF CALIFORNIA. NO. 4. 
The English Snipe. —There i* no bird to be found in this State which 
afford* better s^rt than the English snipe, and none so much admired 
by the epicure. The Scolopax QatUnago, as the naturalists term it, be- 
longi to the family of the Trimjtis, and is usually about ten and a half 
inches in length, with a wing-spread of seventeen inches. Its head is 
rather mdsU ami oblong, with an extremely high forehead. The neck is 
rather short, and the eyes are large and full, of a hazel color. The long 
bill is bluish brown, with the tip black. On the upper part of 
the head are two brownish-black longitudinal bands, separated by a 
narrow central pale brown one, with another of similar color on each side 
of the bill, over the eye; neck palertddiah-brown, spotted with brownish- 
1.1 irk. General color of upper parts, brownish-black, variegated with 
palfl reddish brown. The tail is short and rounded and brownish-black at 
the hue), and barred with five brownish-white streak*. The usual weight 
of sn English snipe is about three ounces. The snipe being a migratory 
bird, there is no provision in our California game laws for its protection. 
The months when it is most frecjuently found within easy access of city 
hunters are January, February and March, and in some localities even 
later on into Spring. In shooting snipe a small-bored, light gun is best, as 
these birds are exceedingly fast on the wing; no largershot than No. 9 should 
be used, and many old hunters use even smaller. A good retriever is the 
only dog required. The English snipe is found in nearly all our marshland 
where fresh water is to be found, and good sport can be often found 
around Alvarado, San Bruno, and even nearer home on the S. P. K. K. 
At certain seasons large flights alight in the Italian gardeners' farms close 
to the railroad, but the gardeners are shy of giving permission and un- 
compromising in their hostility to those who hunt over their lands with- 
out one. When surprised by the hunter they rise at one spring and take 
a rapid zigzag flight for about twenty yards, when they turn, generally 
emitting their peculiarly mournful cry. This is the time to pall the trig- 
ger, as, if they once begin to circle around, the chances are that, though 
looking close, they are really out of range. 

When a snipe alights, its movements are very curious. It first stands 
for an instantin a half-crouching attitude, as if to listeo and assure itself 
that the coast is clear; then raises itself and runs a few steps. If it is 
at all apprehensive of danger, it then squats and there remains until dis- 
turbed. If it feels secure from danger, it moves over the mud or grass 
with light and graceful steps until it has found a suitable spot to probe 
for food. When this is discovered it goes to work in dead earnest, driv- 
ing its beak into the earth eight or ten times in rapid succession. After 
it has satisfied its hunger, it selects a soft tuft of grass and there rests 
until night, when it feeds again. When winged, snipe do not run far, 
though in some isolated cases they go quite a distance before equatting. 
When such is the case, they hide themselves in so effectual a manner that 
it is a mighty hard matter to find them without a dog. The food of the 
snipe consists of ground worms, insects, and the slender, juicy roots of 
difft rent vegetables. Some epicures eat the snipe, inside and all, as they 
would a woodcock, but, as live earth-worms and small leeches are often 
found in the intestines of freshly-killed birds, cleaning, in all cases, ia 
preferable to most people. The finer and warmer the day, the easier 
the English snipe is to approach, and the shorter the distance they 
fly before re-alighting. It requires a long practice to become even a de- 
cent snipe-shot, and the young shooter should, therefore, not be discour- 
aged, but keep peppering away, knowing that the best shots have had to 
go through the same disheartening experience. 



WHY THE "ROYAL" IS THE BEST. 

The Improved method by which it has been made possible to pro- 
duce pure cream of tartar, has had an important bearing upon the man- 
ufacture of baking powder. By the process heretofore generally employ- 
ed it has been found impossible to remove all impurities, more particu- 
larly the tartrate of lime, which remained to such an extent as to greatly 
impair the quality of the cream of tartar, and to interfere seriously with 
the strength and wholesomeness of the baking powders into which it 
entered. 

In the new process which is owned by the Royal Baking Powder Com- 
pany ot New York, and exclusively employed in its extensive tartar 
works, the imported crude grape acid is so treated as to remove all vest- 
ige of tartrate of lime or other impurities, giving a product before un- 
known — a chemically pure cream of tartar. 

By the employment of these superior facilities, the Royal Baking Pow- 
der Company has made the Royal Baking Powder, as the chemists all cer- 
tify, of the highest possible degree of strength, " absolutely pure " and 
wholesome, and with an always uniform leavening power. It is for these 
reasons that the "Royal" never fails to produce bread, buiscuits, cakes, 
etc., that are light, sweet, digestible and wholesome ; the eating of which 
is never followed by indigestion, or any of thoee physical discomforts at- 
tendant upon the partaking of improperly prepared food. In rendering 
possible the production of a baking powder possessed of these quali6ca- 
tions, the improved method of refining cream of tartar becomes a matter 
of material importance to the culinary world. 

Eye-glasses and Spectacles. — Prices to suit all. Muller, the Opti- 
cian, 135 Montgomery street. 



INSURANCE. 



HUTCHINSON A MANN 
iTii-o :in<i ftlarlne Iuoronoe A((euoy, 

Nos. 322 and 334 California Stieet, San Francisco, Cal. 

Capital Represented $27,000,000. 

All Lottet Equitably Adliuted and Promptly I'ald. 

PACIFIC DEPARTMENT 
THE FIRE INSURANCE ASSOCIATION OF LONDON. 

Ill IVHINSON & MANN, Managers 

W. L. CIIALMKItS, ) „ , . . 

E. P. KAKNSWOKT1I, |~N ,wla ' AgentBsnd Adjusters. 



HOME MUTUAL INSURANCE COMPANY, OF CALIFORNIA. 

Organized 1864, 
Prinoipal Offlos 216 Sansome street. 

FIRE INSURANCE. 

Capital Paid Up in TJ. 3. Gold Coin) $300,000 00 

Reinsurance Reserve $200,059 75 

Assets January 1, 18S4. S7W.475.13 j Premiums, since organizat'n $4 611 827 57 

Surplus lor policy holders. .. .$752,096.73 Losses, sinco organization.. $1,972 V'5 40 
Net Surplus (over every thing). $252,036.98 | 

OFFICERS: 

J. F. HOUGIITON President I CUAS. R. STORY Secretary 

J. L. H. SUEPARD Vice-President | R. H. MAGILL General Agent 

Directors oy tub Homb Mutual Insurance Co.— L. L. baker, II. L. Dodge, j. 
L. N. Shepard, John Currey. J. P. Houghton, John Sinclair, C. WoterhouM Ch.inn'ccv 
Taylor, 8. Hull, J. S. Carter, H. P. Coon. April 12. ' 

SOUTH BRITISH AND NATIONAL FIRE AND MARINE INS. CO. 

Capital, 820.000,000- 
Unlimited Liability of Shareholders. 

THE CITY OF LONDON FIRE INSURANCE CO. 

Capital, S10.O00.000- 

THE STANDARD MARINE INSURANCE CO., LIMITED, 

Of Liverpool. Capital, 85,000,000- 

W J. CALMKGHAn A CO., General Agents, 

213-215 Sansome Street 
R. II. X.ll'STO.V. Manager City Department. 

UNION INSURANCE COMPANY OF SAN FRANCISCO. 

PRINCIPAL OFFICE lie CALIFORNIA STREET. 

(CALIFORNIA LLOYDS.) 

Capital 8750,000 | Assets Over 81,000,000 

The Leading Fire and Marine Insurance Co. of California. 

JAS. D. BAILEY Secretary I GUSTAVE TOUCHARD President 

C. P. FARNFIELD General Agent | N. G. KITTLE Vice-President 

GEO. T. BOHEN, Surveyor. 

A JOINT POLICY ISSUEDJSY THE FOUR COMPANIES. 

Imperial Fire Insurance Co , of London Instituted 1803. 

London Assurance Corporation, of London 

....Established by Boyal Charter 1720. 

Northern Assurance Corporation, of London Established 1836. 

Queen Insurance Company, of Liverpool Established 1857. 

ROBERT DICKSON, Manager. 
S-E. Cor. California and Montgomery Sts., Safe Deposit Building. 

PHOINIX ASSURANCE COMPANY 

Of London, England, Estab'd 1782.-Cash Assets, $5,266,372.35 

BRITISH AMERICA ASSURANCE COMPANY 

Of Toronto, Canada, Estab'd 1833.— Cash Assets, $1,343,908.54 

WESTERN ASSURANCE COMPANY 

Of Toronto, Canada, Estab'd 185 1— Cash Assets, $1,357,326.39 

BITLER dc H ALDAN, 
General Agents lor Pacific Coast, 

405 California Street San Francisco. 

THE SWISS MARINE INS. COMPANIES COMBINED. 

Switzerland, of Zurich. Capital 5,000,000 francs; Helvetia, 
of St. Gall, Capital 10,000,000 francs ; Baloise, of Basle, Capital 5,000,000 francs. 
These three Companies are liable jointly and severally for all losses that may be suu- 
ained. Losses made payable in all the principal seaports of the world. In the set- 
tlement of all claims under an English policy, these Companies will strictly adhere to 
the conditions andxustoms adopted at Lloyds, and submit to English jurisdiction. 
June 9, HARRY W. SYZ, Agent, 420 and 422 California st., S. F. 

NATIONAL ASSURANCE COMPANY OF IRELAND. 

[ESTABLISHED A. D. 1822.] 
Authorized Capital. $10, 000,000 I Subscribed Capital... $5,000,000 

H. M. NEWHALL Sl CO., 
General Agents for the Pacific Coast. 

Office— 309 Sansome street, San Francisco. 



BRITISH AND FOREIGN MARINE INS. CO. OF LIVERPOOL. 

(Capital $5, 000, 000. -Airen(s: Balfonr, Guthrie <t Co., No. 
j 316 California street, San Francisco. Nov. 18. 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Feb. 7, 1885. 



A ROTTEN MEASURE. 
Tberels a BUI now pending before the Legislature which should be 
killed without a moment's consideration, because it is one of the most 
outrageous measures ever proposed. It is known as Assembly Bil ^ 
251, and its purpose is to take the collection of the Poll Tax from the As- 
sessor's Office and give it to the Tax Collector s Office. 1 he only 
advantage which would result from this step would be to make positions 
for quite an army of additional clerks in the Tax Collector Office, to 
argely reduce the amount of Poll Tax collected, and to largely increase 
the cost of collecting it. As a matter of prudence, it is always considered 
unwise to change the existing order of things unless there is some distinct 
and apparent gain to be made by so doing. In this case a distinct and 
apparent loss is discernible without the aid of spectacles, and that should 
be sufficient to cause every conscientious representative of the people to 
vote against it. Now for a few facts. _ . 

A large portion of the Poll Tax is collected outside of the office and 
from persons who have little or no property If a very active search 
was not made for this money it would never be collected. It is in this 
way that over ninety per cent, of the Poll Tax at present received is se- 
cured Now the Tax Collector's office is, strictly speaking, a receiving 
rather than a collection establishment. Its clerks are supposed to stay 
in the office and do their business there. If any one is sent ontside the 
force will have to be increased, and, if anything like an adequate canvas 
of the city is to be made, the increase will be so great, in the matter of 
cost, as to almost entirely sweep away the substantial sum w hie h is 
yearly turned over to the credit of the School Fund. On the other hand 
the Assessor's office is perfectly equipped for the proper execution of 
this work For three months subsequent to the first Monday in March 
the Assessor is compelled to have in the held, making a house to house 
canvas of the city, a force of something like one hundred deputies. 1 his 
canvas is thorough, and it is but little extra labor for these men to look 
after the Poll Tax. During this house to house inspection Poll lax is 
annually collected from about twenty-two thousand whites and from oyer 
thirteen thousand Chinese. Under any other system it is doubtful !f a 
third of this amount would ever be obtained, and to get that third an 
outlay about equal to the present one would be necessary These facts 
show that the present proposal is a scandalous one and that the cause ot 
good government will be served by its defeat. _ 

It is to be recollected, too, that the experiment of having the Tax Col- 
lector collect the poll tax is not a new one. It has already been tried, and 
the trial was unsatisfactory— very unsatisfactory, indeed. * rum 160,1 to 
1872 the Tax Collector had charge of this work, and the result was that, in 
the face of a rapid increase in population, material resources, etc., etc., 
the revenue thus obtained showed a steady decrease. In 18, 2 the collec- 
tion was turned over to the Assessor, and the revenue obtained that year 
was fifty-eight thousand dollars, as against thirty-three thonsaud do lars 
collected during the preceding year. These facts speak for themselves, 
and are worthy of careful attention. .... .. .. .x. 

In addition to these objections, there is the further objection that the 
proposed bill bears the finger-marks of unconstitutionality all over it. 
Surely it is not worth while to try to strain the Constitution for the sake 
of a measure which is uncalled for and can only accomplish harm. 

A WORD OR TWO IN EXPLANATION. 

In an explanatory sentence or two, introducing our reply to the 
Beries of outrageous assaults which an obscure paper has been making on 
the publishers of the News Letter for a long time past, we stated, last 
week that a gentleman was not called upon to resent the impertinence of 
every cur which gave a passing bark at his heels, but that where one par- 
ticular cur followed a gentleman with noisy demonstration for a consid- 
erable distance, dignity as well as comfort demanded that the cur be 
soundly thrashed. We desire, now, to amplify that statement by adding 
that, while it is the duty of the gentleman to thrash the cur, it is not his 
duty to follow the brute up as he has been followed. That would be lower- 
ing himself to the level of his assailant. The News Letter does not 
propose to lower itself to the level of the obscure paper, and, having pret- 
ty thoroughly exposed the personality which controls it, and the base 
motives which animate it, we will rest on our oars. In this connection 
we desire to say that we have received assurances from Mr. Porter Ashe 
to the effect that, although he owns a small interest in the paper alluded 
to he has no personal connection with it, tan exercise no control over it, 
and is in nowise responsible for its utterances. Under these circum- 
stances we have to regret that we coupled Mr. Ashe with the manage- 
ment of the paper in question in our article of last week, and, in the ex- 
citement of the moment, made some harsh remarks about him. 

As for the Thing behind which stalks the shadow of the mad-house, 
and before which we think we can see the yawning gates of the Peniten- 
tiary, we have nothing to regret. Many old friends of the News Letter 
have been inclined to doubt the propriety of our involving the family of 
this McDowell person in the discussion, by the very pointed allusion made to 
his mental condition. None of these gentlemen have ever read the out- 
rageous manner in which the elder Mr. Marriott was abused, even when 
this brutal ruffian knew he was lying on a bed of sickness from which be 
never arose; nor do they know that two weeks ago all this abuse of the 
dead man was reiterated in the following expression : "Our opinion of 
his father has not changed since his decease." Those who are acquainted 
with the merits of the controversy know that we merely paid the chat- 
tering idiot back in his own coin— save and except the fact that when the 
News Letter hits out from the shoulder it usually leaves a mark. At 
the same time we desire to call attention to the fact that the News Let- 
ter's language was exceedingly guarded, and was chosen with a view to 
stating this person's mental condition without involving his domestic re- 
lations further than could be helped. 

The Irish do not seem to 6nd America large enough for them to emi- 
grate to. They look for fresh woods and pastures new, and where do 
you think? In Russia. According to the Journal de St. Petersburg, an 
Irishman residing at the Russian capital is hard at work preparing a 
proper reception to some three hundred of bis countrymen who intend 
settling in the southern provinces of Russia. If they can get to like the 
vodka, and substitute it for whisky, they can have quite a jolly time in 
Russia, and are always sure to find somebody willing to fight. 



A CONTEMPTIBLE FRAUD, 
Wellington Coal, has for many years been the favorite fuel in the 
San Francisco market. The enormous demand for it naturally excited the 
envy of ontside mine owners, many of whom have exhausted every 
method in the vain attempt to depreciate its superior quality in the eyes 
of economical consumers. Failing in this respect, the last device of un 
scrupulous business men must fain be adopted and that too, in a qua, ter 
least to be anticipated. John Rosenfeld, is the owner of the mine from 
which is produced the inferior quality of coal known as ISauaimo His 
agents in this city, Frank Barnard & Co., conceived the brilliant idea 
that by attempting to conceal the identity of their coal under the flimsy 
disguise of a new name-the South Field Wellington they could success- 
fully delude customers into purchasing their products in the belief that 
they were obtaining the genuine Wellington. . 

For the benefit of its readers the News Letter desires to say that the 
published statements in regard to this counterfeit are not as correct in 
every particular as they might be. The Nanaimo or Southfield Welling- 
ton mine is not located at or near the Wellington district and its product 
does not possess any of the well-known and desirable characteristics of 
the Wellington coal-not even sufficient to blind or mislead the most in- 
experienced housewife. It certainly would not flatter Vancouver Island 
were we to state that the Nanaimo mine with the alias is situated on the 
best portion of the famous coal belt of that island Small tricks seldom 
brine large returns, and we would not be surprised if the owners of this 
Nanaimo! or the Southfield Wellington, as they may please to term it, 
found out that the straight course in business is the best in the long run, 
and that when men resort to petty tricks in order to p ace a rival at a 
disadvantage, they oftentimes cut a rod for their own backs. 

The News Letter has at all times been a firm opponent of trade 
frauds, and if a scheme of this description does not merit the name under 
what other category can it be placed? The intent is obvious Nothing 
more nor less than attempt to obtain business on the strength of an as- 
sumed name. The mere fact of change of name in an article which has 
been before the public for years, indicates weakness in some particular. 
Some trashy, worthless commodity, which has been hawked over all cre- 
ation to no purpose, appears suddenly, decked out in borrowed plumes of 
success, and is foisted on an unsuspecting community by some trickster, 
who rates his brains higher than commercial integrity. Such a system 
of business may be expected from quack medicine venders and the many 
other itinerant frauds who disgrace our much-bragged-of civilization, but 
should not be tolerated in the legitimate channels of trade Chambers 
of Commerce, wherever organized, should take cognizance of such repre- 
hensible practices and adopt stringent measures to check their growth. 
Thev tend to destroy confidence, which is the life and soul of trade, and 
degrade the honored profession of merchant beneath the rank of a hucks- 
tering mountebank. It is scarcely necessary to caution our readers 
against this flimsy trade-trick, nor to remind them that Southfield Wel- 
lington is not the simon-pure article, having htte doubt that the quality 
of their purchases will speak for itself and speedily lead to the detection 

of the "Nanaimo" c ounterfeit. 

A CURIOUS CASE. 
The anlt of Jones vs. Brandenstein. at present pending before the 
Superior Court, hassome peculiar features. Jones and Brandensteln were 
partners with E*berg & Bachman, under the hrm name of the Seal Rock 
Tobacco Co.. in this city, having bought out the factory of J. B. Pace, of 
Richmond, Virginia. Brandenstein, it would appear, desired to get pos- 
session of the entire property from Jones, and replevmed the same in 
name of the Seal Rnck Tobacco Co. The Court held replevin would not 
lie and ordered restoration of property to Jones, who brought suit to get 
partnership wound up and for a proper distribution of assets. Pending 
that suit, and in order to beat the order of the Court and deprive Jones 
of possession, Brandenstein makes a note to L. P Drexler, in name of the 
Co Drexler, in course of time, brings suit on this note, obtains a judg- 
m